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Security

Free Linux Firewall OS IPFire 2.15 Core 81 Features Gets Multiple Fixes

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux
Security

Michael Tremer, a developer for the ipfire.org team, has announced that IPFire 2.13 Core 81, a new stable build of the popular Linux-based firewall distribution, bringing quite a few security fixes.

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Linux Security Threats on the Rise

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Every year, heck...every month, Linux is adopted by more companies and organizations as an important if not primary component of their enterprise platform. And the more serious the hardware platform, the more likely it is to be running Linux. 60% of servers, 70% of Web servers and 95% of all supercomputers are Linux-based!

Even if they're not "Linux shops", companies realize certain benefits from bringing Linux in for specific purposes. Its reliability, flexibility, scalability and cost of ownership offer huge advantages over other OSes...but I don't have to tell you that, do I? You probably earn your keep because of these statistics!

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Qubes 2 RC2 Is Probably the Most Secure Operating System in Existence – Gallery

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Qubes, an open source operating system designed to provide strong security for desktop computing, which is based on Xen, X Window System, and Linux and can run most Linux applications and utilize most of the Linux drivers, is now at version 2 RC2 and it's ready for testing.

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IPFire 2.15 Core 80 Is a Powerful and Free Linux Firewall OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Michael Tremer, a developer for the ipfire.org team, has announced that IPFire 2.13 Core 80, a new stable build of the popular Linux-based firewall distribution, has been released and is now available for download.

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Mozilla's Developer Network Site Has Leaks

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security

Mozilla's website dedicated to developers has suffered from a database error that has exposed email addresses and encrypted passwords of registered users for about a month, the company announced.
About 76,000 Mozilla Development Network (MDN) users had their email addresses exposed, along with around 4,000 encrypted passwords, said Stormy Peters, director of development relations, and Joe Stevensen, operations security manager. Many of those affected have already been notified.

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Answering questions regarding the Fedora Security Team

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Wow, I had no idea that people would care about the start of this project. There seems to be a few questions out there that I’d like to address here to clarify what we are doing and why.

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Mitro Releases a New Free & Open Source Password Manager

Filed under
OSS
Security

Today, Twitter acquired a password manager startup called Mitro. As part of the deal, Mitro will be releasing the source to its client and server code under the GPL.

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DHS Wants To Help Developers Secure Open-Source Software

Filed under
OSS
Security

The Department of Homeland Security is funding a project aimed at protecting the nation's critical infrastructure and networks by providing tools that test for defects in open source and commercial software.

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Tor anonymity service says unknown attackers compromised its network

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS
Security

The Tor encryption service is a high-profile bastion of computer security, but the project appears to have been compromised earlier this year. Today, the Tor Project blog announced that an unknown party likely managed to gather information about people who were looking up hidden services — websites that users can operate and visit anonymously, like Silk Road — and could theoretically have compromised other parts of the network.

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The security flaws in Tails Linux are not its only problem

Filed under
Security
Debian

If you want to use Tor, then Tails is your best friend. Tails is a version of Linux that sends data through the Tor network.

All Internet traffic to/from Tails goes through Tor, making it resistant to end user mistakes. Tails is not normally installed on a computer, instead it's run from a bootable DVD, USB flash drive or flash memory card. Compared to the Tor Browser Bundle, Tails is unquestionably the way to go. Ed Snowden uses it.

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Kernel: Virtme, 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference and Linux Foundation Articles

  • Virtme: The kernel developers' best friend
    When working on the Linux Kernel, testing via QEMU is pretty common. Many virtual drivers have been recently merged, useful either to test the kernel core code, or your application. These virtual drivers make QEMU even more attractive.
  • 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference
    As in previous years we’re trying to organize an audio miniconference so we can get together and talk through issues, especially design decisons, face to face. This year’s event will be held on Sunday October 21st in Edinburgh, the day before ELC Europe starts there.
  • How Writing Can Expand Your Skills and Grow Your Career [Ed: Linux Foundation article]
    At the recent Open Source Summit in Vancouver, I participated in a panel discussion called How Writing can Change Your Career for the Better (Even if You don't Identify as a Writer. The panel was moderated by Rikki Endsley, Community Manager and Editor for Opensource.com, and it included VM (Vicky) Brasseur, Open Source Strategy Consultant; Alex Williams, Founder, Editor in Chief, The New Stack; and Dawn Foster, Consultant, The Scale Factory.
  • At the Crossroads of Open Source and Open Standards [Ed: Another Linux Foundation article]
    A new crop of high-value open source software projects stands ready to make a big impact in enterprise production, but structural issues like governance, IPR, and long-term maintenance plague OSS communities at every turn. Meanwhile, facing significant pressures from open source software and the industry groups that support them, standards development organizations are fighting harder than ever to retain members and publish innovative standards. What can these two vastly different philosophies learn from each other, and can they do it in time to ensure they remain relevant for the next 10 years?

Red Hat: PodCTL, Security Embargos at Red Hat and Energy Sector

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #50 – Listener Mailbag Questions
    As the community around PodCTL has grown (~8000 weekly listeners) we’ve constantly asked them to give us feedback on topics to discuss and areas where they want to learn. This week we discussed and answered a number of questions about big data and analytics, application deployments, routing security, and storage deployment models.
  • Security Embargos at Red Hat
    The software security industry uses the term Embargo to describe the period of time that a security flaw is known privately, prior to a deadline, after which time the details become known to the public. There are no concrete rules for handling embargoed security flaws, but Red Hat uses some industry standard guidelines on how we handle them. When an issue is under embargo, Red Hat cannot share information about that issue prior to it becoming public after an agreed upon deadline. It is likely that any software project will have to deal with an embargoed security flaw at some point, and this is often the case for Red Hat.
  • Transforming oil & gas: Exploration and production will reap the rewards
    Through advanced technologies based on open standards, Red Hat deliver solutions that can support oil and gas companies as they modernize their IT infrastructures and build a framework to meet market and technology challenges. Taking advantage of modern, open architectures can help oil and gas providers attract new customers and provide entry into markets where these kinds of services were technologically impossible a decade ago.

BlackArch Linux Ethical Hacking OS Now Has More Than 2000 Hacking Tools

The BlackArch Linux penetration testing and ethical hacking computer operating system now has more than 2000 tools in its repositories, announced the project's developers recently. Used by thousands of hundreds of hackers and security researchers all over the world, BlackArch Linux is one of the most acclaimed Linux-based operating systems for hacking and other security-related tasks. It has its own software repositories that contain thousands of tools. The OS is based on the famous Arch Linux operating system and follows a rolling release model, where users install once and receive updates forever, or at least until they do something that can't be repaired and need to reinstall. Read more