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Security

Matriux Linux Operating System For Hackers — An Alternative To Kali Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Matriux is an open source Linux-based operating system that’s designed in accordance with the needs of security researchers and professionals. The OS comes with more than 300 hacking tools that include the likes of Wireshark, Aircrack-ng, Nmap, Vidalia, TrueCrypt and more. Matriux hacking OS features a traditional desktop environment that’s powered by GNOME Classic

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Linux Ransomware and why everyone could be affected [Ed: Bitdefender ad as ‘article’]
  • Kaiten targets Linux routers, gateways, access points and now IoT

    Change default passwords on network equipment even if it is not reachable from the Internet.

  • Security is really about Risk vs Reward

    Every now and then the conversation erupts about what is security really? There's the old saying that the only secure computer is one that's off (or fill in your favorite quote here, there are hundreds). But the thing is, security isn't the binary concept: you can be secure, or insecure. That's not how anything works. Everything is a sliding scale, you are never secure, you are never insecure. You're somewhere in the middle. Rather than bumble around about your risk though, you need to understand what's going on and plan for the risk.

Safety/Privacy in Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security
  • Firefox and cookie micromanagement

    For most of its existence, Firefox has provided users with the ability to manage how cookies are stored with a rather high degree of granularity: users can block specific cookies, create site-wide exceptions to the accept/block policy, and configure behavior for third-party cookies. Up until Firefox 44, there was an additional option as well, one that allowed users to choose the expiration point (that is, expiring them at the end of the session or letting them persist) for every cookie they encounter. That option was removed in the Firefox 44 release, which has made some users rather unhappy.

    The option in question was found in the Privacy preferences screen, labeled "Ask me every time" on the "Keep until:" selector. When enabled, the option raised a dialog box asking the user to accept or reject each cookie encountered, with a "accept for this session only" choice provided. Removing the option was proposed in 2010, although the patch to perform the removal did not land until 2015. It was released in Firefox 44 in January 2016.

  • How Safe Browsing works in Firefox

    If you want to learn more about how Safe Browsing works in Firefox, you can find all of the technical details on the Safe Browsing and Application Reputation pages of the Mozilla wiki or you can ask questions on our mailing list.

  • Decentraleyes Addon Fixes Browser Privacy, Circumvents CDNs

    Widespread CDN acceptance has been a security flaw that sacrifices privacy simply because it breaks web pages on anything put a text-based browser, which is a sacrifice few are willing to make for the sake of their information remaining local.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Reviewing Important Healthcare Cybersecurity Frameworks [Ed: Microsoft Windows]

    Just recently, a ransomware attack affected Hollywood Presbyterian in California, causing the hospital to pay $17,000 to regain access to its databases.

  • U.S., Canada issue joint alert on 'ransomware' after hospital attacks [iophk: The governments need to track down those spreading Windows in the hospitals.]

    The United States and Canada on Thursday issued a rare joint cyber alert, warning against a recent surge in extortion attacks that infect computers with viruses known as "ransomware," which encrypt data and demand payments for it to be unlocked.

    The warning follows reports from several private security firms that they expect the crisis to worsen, because hackers are getting more sophisticated and few businesses have adopted proper security measures to thwart such attacks.

  • NIST Publishes New Security Standard For Encrypting Credit Card, Medical Info

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed new encryption methods for securing financial data and other sensitive information.

    The NIST publication SP 800-38G authored by Morris Dworkin specifies cryptography standards for both binary and non-binary data, preserving the look and feel of the unencrypted digits. Earlier encryption methods designed by NIST worked for binary data. But for strings of decimal numbers, there was no feasible technique to produce coded data that preserves the original format.

LibreOffice 5.2 Launches in August, First Bug Hunting Session Starts April 22

Filed under
LibO
Security

On March 31, 2016, The Document Foundation Co-Founder Italo Vignoli announced the release plan for the upcoming major release of the world's popular free office suite, LibreOffice 5.2.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Thursday's security updates
  • Your router could succumb to a new Telnet worm

    Building botnets made up of routers, modems, wireless access points and other networking devices doesn't require sophisticated exploits. Remaiten, a new worm that infects embedded systems, spreads by taking advantage of weak Telnet passwords.

    Remaiten is the latest incarnation of distributed denial-of-service Linux bots designed for embedded architectures. Its authors actually call it KTN-Remastered, where KTN most likely stands for a known Linux bot called Kaiten.

  • Remaiten Is a New DDoS Bot Targeting Linux-Based Home Routers

    Malware coders have created a new DDoS bot called Remaiten that targets home routers running on common Linux architectures, which also shares a lot of similarities with other DDoS bots like Tsunami and Gafgyt.

  • Oh, Look: Yet Another Security Flaw In Government Websites

    Or worse. The open direct could lead to spyware and malware, rather than just advertising masquerading as content or bottom-feeder clickbait. Fortunately, you can keep an eye on what URLs are being reached using these open redirects via this link. Unfortunately, it may be only citizens keeping an eye on that page, and they're in no position to prevent further abuse.

  • CNBC Asks Readers To Submit Their Password To Check Its Strength Into Exploitable Widget

    People's passwords and their relative strength and weakness is a subject I know quite well. As part of my business, we regularly battle users who think very simple passwords, often times relating to their birthdays and whatnot, are sufficient. Sometimes they simply make "password" or a similiar variant their go-to option. So, when CNBC put together a widget for readers to input the passwords they use to get feedback on their strength or weakness, I completely understand what they were attempting to accomplish. Password security is a real issue, after all -- which is what makes it all the more face-palming that the widget CNBC used was found to be exploitable.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Linux Security Summit 2016 – CFP Announced!

    The 2016 Linux Security Summit (LSS) will be held in Toronto, Canada, on 25th and 26th, co-located with LinuxCon North America. See the full announcement.

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • Your computerdump sister also can hack Linux – Orange Tekno Time

    A newly discovered vulnerability makes it incredibly easy to break into a large pool of Linux-based computers. A security hole found in Grub2, a widely-used bootloader in many Linux distributions including Ubuntu and Red Hat, allows a user to login to a computer by pressing the backspace key 28 times. Various Linux distributions have released a patch for the vulnerability.

  • New DDoS Defense Turns Servers Into 'Moving Targets'

    The distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack is the classic cheap hack. It requires virtually nothing of those who wield it beyond the ability to download something from the internet, yet a DDoS offers unusually public consequences (most real security breaches happen in the dark). It is also difficult to defend against, in some part because it doesn't involve actually breaching a network at all—just flooding it with more innocuous-seeming traffic than it can handle.

  • Google Offers Rare Glimpse at Its Data Center Security Measures

    Laser beam intrusion detection systems, iris scanners and customized access cards are just some of the controls that Google uses to protect its data centers.

    A laser beam intrusion detection system, customized electronic access cards and biometric iris scans are just some of the multilevel security measures that Google has implemented to control access to its data centers.

  • Ransomware is scary, but not for the reasons you think it is

    If we keep thinking about this and bring the ransomware to its logical conclusion, the future versions are going to request a constant ongoing payment. Not a one time get out of jail free event. Why charge them once when you can charge them over and over again? Most modern infrastructures are complex enough it will be hard to impossible to remove an extremely clever bit of malware. It's going to be time for the good guys to step it up here, more thoughts on that some other day though.

    There is even a silly angle that's fun to ponder. We could imagine ransomware that attacks other known malware. If the ransomware is getting a constant ongoing payment, it would be bad if anything else could remove it, from legitimate software to other ransomware. While I don't think antivirus and ransomware will ever converge on the same point, it's still fun to think about.

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