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Security

Our privacy is interdependent

Filed under
Android
Security

Last week I gave a presentation at CommonsFest in the spirit of my Free Your Android post, trying to educate people on simple steps they can make to have better privacy on their mobile devices.

A couple of days before my presentation I watched this great speech from Jillian York and Jacob Appelbaum (please go and watch this). At some point Jacob mentions that "our security is interdependent".

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Is Desktop Linux Secure?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Considering that security suites aren’t commonly used with Linux on the desktop, this is a legitimate question and worthy of being answered in depth. In this article, I’ll look at how malware affects the Linux community, what vulnerabilities often get ignored and what you should do about it.

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Security pioneer Alan Solomon uses Linux to avoid viruses

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Alan Solomon, creator of Dr Soloman's Antivirus, has admitted to using Linux to avoid viruses rather than try to combat them on Windows.

His comments come after Symantec's Brian Dye estimated that antivirus systems do not even catch half of cyber attacks.

Writing of his decision on his blog, Solomon said: "There doesn't seem to be much malware for Linux. I don't know why. Some say it's because Linux's security is better, some say it's because fewer people use it. I'm not really bothered."

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Open Source Android ALYT Security And Smart Home Manager (video)

Filed under
Android
Security

ALYT is a smart home manager that runs Google’s Android operating system and is completely open source allowing you to tailor it to your exact requirements.

ALYT has been designed to allow users to control home security systems as well as energy usage, entertainment systems as well as providing home automation via an Android powered smartphone or tablet device. Check out the video after the jump to learn more about this new and innovative smart home management system.

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OpenBSD Affirms That LibreSSL Will Be Portable

Filed under
Security
BSD

In the fallout from the OpenSSL heartbleed bug, OpenBSD developers forked OpenSSL into LibreSSL. Initially the only supported platform for LibreSSL was OpenBSD, but the BSD developers are pushing harder now for platform portability.

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Put portable pwning power in your pocket with the Pwn Phone

Filed under
Android
Linux
Security

Mobile technology has made it possible for people to do an amazing amount with tablets and smartphones within the workplace—including hacking the living daylights out of the corporate network and other people’s devices. Pwnie Express is preparing to release a tool that will do just that. Its Pwn Phone aims to help IT departments and security professionals quickly get a handle on how vulnerable their networks are in an instant. All someone needs to do is walk around the office with a smartphone.

Pwnie Express’ Kevin Reilly gave Ars a personal walk-through of the latest Pwn Phone, the second generation of the company’s mobile penetration testing platform. While the 2012 first-generation Pwn Phone was based on the Nokia N900 and its Maemo 5 Linux-based operating system, the new phone is based on LG Nexus 5 phone hardware. However, it doesn’t exactly use Google’s vanilla Android.

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The oRouter Is A Tor-Powered Linux Box That Secures Your Internet Connection

Filed under
Linux
Security

Longtime TechCrunch Disrupt NY hackathon participants, Kay Anar and Gilad Shai showed off their hardware hack today called the “oRouter” – a Linux-powered, Raspberry Pi-like computer offering secure Wi-Fi access via the Tor network. The idea is to offer an affordable alternative to downloading the Tor software to your computer, as well as a way to more easily connect to Tor over mobile devices like an iPhone.

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Android home automation hub focuses on security

Filed under
Android
Security

The Android-based “ALYT” home automation system supports numerous wireless protocols, and offers self-learning algorithms and advanced security functions.

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Designing a Prize for Usable Cryptography

Filed under
OSS
Security

To that end, EFF is evaluating the feasibility of offering a prize for the first usable, secure, and private end-to-end encrypted communication tool. We believe a prize based on objective usability metrics (such as the percentage of users who were able to install and start using the tool within a few minutes, and the percentage who survived simulated impersonation or man-in-the-middle attacks) might be an effective way to determine which project or projects are best delivering communication security to vulnerable user communities; to promote and energize those tools; and to encourage interaction between developers, interaction designers and academics interested in this space.

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Amazon Web Services, Cisco, Dell, Facebook, Fujitsu, Google, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, NetApp, Rackspace, VMware and The Linux Foundation Form New Initiative to Support Critical Open Source Projects

Filed under
OSS
Security

“We are expanding the work we already do for the Linux kernel to other projects that may need support,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation. “Our global economy is built on top of many open source projects. Just as The Linux Foundation has funded Linus Torvalds to be able to focus 100% on Linux development, we will now be able to support additional developers and maintainers to work full-time supporting other essential open source projects. We are thankful for these industry leaders’ commitment to ensuring the continued growth and reliability of critical open source projects such as OpenSSL.”

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Linux Growth Demands Bigger Talent Poo

Today at LinuxCon and CloudOpen we're making an announcement that signifies the natural next step in helping to build a qualified talent pool of Linux professionals worldwide:The Linux Foundation Certification Program. We sought to create a new Linux certification program that is innovative, highly valued among Linux pro’s and employers and advances the state-of the-art of certification exams. We think it's a different approach to testing and can help advance Linux by bringing more Linux talent into the market. The exams are available anytime, anywhere; performance based with testing in the command line; and distribution flexible. Let me tell you a bit more about why we believe this is so important. Linux today powers most of the technology infrastructure that runs our daily lives. It is the fastest growing platform in nearly every sector of technology from embedded systems, mobile devices and consumer electronics to the cloud, enterprise server, high performance computing and more. Read more

Linux Foundation to offer new certification for IT workers

With an eye toward deepening the global Linux talent pool, the Linux Foundation today announced that it will offer two new certifications for engineers and administrators. The Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator, or LFCS, and the Linux Foundation Certified Engineer, or LFCE certificates will be granted to applicants who pass an automated online exam. The cost will be $300, although the foundation will hand out 1,000 free passes to attendees at LinuxCon, where the announcement was made. Read more More: Linux Foundation Debuts Linux Certification Effort

Parsix GNU/Linux 7.0 Test 1 Is an Interesting Debian and GNOME 3.12 Combination

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Linux Founder Linus Torvalds 'Still Wants the Desktop'

The Linux faithful gathered today at LinuxCon to hear core Linux developers, especially Linus Torvalds—and the audience wasn't disappointed. In a keynote panel session, Torvalds spoke of his hopes and the challenges for Linux in 2014. Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman moderated the discussion and commented that Linux already runs everywhere. He asked Torvalds where he thinks Linux should go next. Read more