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Security

Security: Updates, CVE-2017-7543, and Windows Chaos Again

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Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Red Hat Secures Networking Flaws in OpenStack, the Linux Kernel

    Red Hat has fixed an important vulnerability in the OpenStack subsystem that’s used to manage network connectivity to and from virtual machines. If left unpatched, it could allow an attacker to access network resources from virtual machines.

    The vulnerability, tracked as CVE-2017-7543 in the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) database, is located in openstack-neutron, a “pluggable, scalable and API-driven” component of the Red Hat OpenStack Platform that’s used to provision networking services to virtual machines.

  • Atomicorp Releases First Kernel-Level Docker Security and is Available Today Through AWS, Azure and Direct
  • Shadow Brokers Eternal Exploits expected to remain effective

    The Shadow Brokers also leaked exploits such as EternalRomance which is similar to EternalBlue but targets Windows 7 SP1 machines using SMBv2 and targets a vulnerability in the process of handling SMBv1 transactions, EternalSynergy which uses a packet type confusion vulnerability, and EternalChampion which takes advantage of a race condition in transaction hand.

  • Shadow Brokers EternalPulsar malware: All you need to know about the leaked NSA SMB exploits

    Cylance researchers said the DoublePulsar backdoor, which experts previously said had successfully infected around 100,000 computers shortly after the exploit was leaked in April, functions as a backdoor providing hackers with secret access to Windows systems.

  • IoT Security for Developers

    Previous articles focused on how to securely design and configure a system based on existing hardware, software, IoT Devices, and networks. If you are developing IoT devices, software, and systems, there is a lot more you can do to develop secure systems.

    The first thing is to manage and secure communications with IoT Devices. Your software needs to be able to discover, configure, manage and communicate with IoT devices. By considering security implications when designing and implementing these functions you can make the system much more robust. The basic guideline is don’t trust any device. Have checks to verify that a device is what it claims to be, to verify device integrity, and to validate communications with the devices.

  • Powerful backdoor found in software used by >100 banks and energy cos. [Ed: Yet more back doors in proprietary software on Microsoft Windows]

    For 17 days starting last month, an advanced backdoor that gave attackers complete control over networks lurked in digitally signed software used by hundreds of banks, energy companies, and pharmaceutical manufacturers, researchers warned Tuesday.

    The backdoor, dubbed ShadowPad, was added to five server- or network-management products sold by NetSarang, a software developer with offices in South Korea and the US. The malicious products were available from July 17 to August 4, when the backdoor was discovered and privately reported by researchers from antivirus provider Kaspersky Lab. Anyone who uses the five NetSarang titles Xmanager Enterprise 5.0, Xmanager 5.0, Xshell 5.0, Xftp 5.0, or Xlpd 5.0, should immediately review posts here and here from NetSarang and Kaspersky Lab respectively.

Security Leftovers

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Security

Security: Update, Ransomware, Microsoft Windows at Hotels and More Black Duck FUD

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Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 59 - The VPN Episode
  • Update gone wrong leaves 500 smart locks inoperable

    Hundreds of Internet-connected locks became inoperable last week after a faulty software update caused them to experience a fatal system error, manufacturer LockState said.

    The incident is the latest reminder that the so-called Internet of Things—in which locks, thermostats, and other everyday appliances are embedded with small Internet-connected computers—often provide as many annoyances as they do conveniences. Over the past week, the Colorado-based company's Twitter feed has been gorged with comments from customers who were suddenly unable to lock or unlock their doors normally. Complicating the matter: the affected LockState model—the RemoteLock 6i—is included in an Airbnb partnership called Host Assist. That left many hosts unable to remotely control their locks.

  • Ransomware Targeting WordPress – An Emerging Threat

    Recently, the Wordfence team has seen ransomware being used in attacks targeting WordPress. We are currently tracking a ransomware variant we are calling “EV ransomware.” The following post describes what this ransomware does and how to protect yourself from being hit by this attack.

  • AWS unveils AI monitoring for Amazon S3
  • FancyBear Use Leaked NSA “WannaCry” Exploit To Target Hospitality Industry [Ed: The solution to this is simple: don't use Microsoft Windows at hotels]

    Microsoft has indicated that a number of different versions of Windows are vulnerable to the EternalBlue exploit, even those currently receiving support. It is imperative that IT teams from all businesses across all industries ensure that the version of Windows that they are using is not vulnerable to EternalBlue and, if so, take the necessary steps to remediate it. With three attacks using this exploit having occurred over just the past few months, we’re likely to see cybercriminals continuing to deploy it until devices are patched and it is no longer an effective vector for them to spread malware.”

  • Researcher who neutralized WCry pleads not guilty to writing banking malware

    Marcus Hutchins, the British security researcher instrumental in neutralizing the virulent WCry ransomware worm that shut down computers worldwide in May, appeared in federal court Monday and pleaded not guilty to unrelated criminal charges that he created and distributed malware that steals banking credentials.

    [...]

    Hutchins, who works for Kryptos Logic of Los Angeles, is going to live in Los Angeles while awaiting an undetermined trial date. He will be tracked by a GPS monitoring device. He has been ordered not to touch the WCry sinkhole, presumably because if it's shut off, it could possibly make the ransomware start spreading again.

  • Innovation may be outpacing security in cars [Ed: ITProPortal cites the liars from Black Duck to make it sound as though FOSS is the root of all security issues. Profitable FUD (to them).]

    As the UK government’s car cybersec guidelines recognise, innovation may be outpacing security in cars. When you put new technology into cars, you’ll inevitably run into security challenges.

Security: Updates, Back Doors and More

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Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • Former NSA Official Argues The Real Problem With Undisclosed Exploits Is Careless End Users [Ed: Many are NOT "Undisclosed Exploits" but back doors]

    As leaked NSA software exploits have been redeployed to cause computer-based misery all over the world, the discussion about vulnerability disclosures has become louder. The argument for secrecy is based on the assumption that fighting an existential threat (terrorism, but likely also a variety of normal criminal behavior) outweighs concerns the general public might have about the security of their software/data/personal information. Plenty of recent real-world examples (hospital systems ransomed! etc.) do the arguing for those seeking expanded disclosure of vulnerabilities and exploits.

    Former Deputy Director of the NSA Rick Ledgett appears on the pages of Lawfare to argue against disclosure, just as one would have gathered by reading his brief author bio. Ledgett's arguments, however, feel more like dodges. First off, Ledgett says the NSA shouldn't have to disclose every vulnerability/exploit it has in its arsenal, an argument very few on the other side of the issue are actually making. Then he says arguments against exploit hoarding "oversimplify" the issue.

  • But that's not my job!

    This week I've been thinking about how security people and non security people interact. Various conversations I have often end up with someone suggesting everyone needs some sort of security responsibility. My suspicion is this will never work.

  • HBO hackers release Curb Your Enthusiasm episodes

    Hackers who broke into HBO's computer systems last month continue to release the network's content, including episodes of the return of Curb Your Enthusiasm, which is slated to air in October.

  • The Ultimate Virus: How Malware Encoded In Synthesized DNA Can Compromise A Computer System

    If nothing else, this first DNA malware hack confirms that there is no unbridgeable gulf between the programs running in our cells, and those running on our computers. Digital code is digital code.

Free security service scans open source Linux IoT binaries

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Linux
OSS
Security

Insignary unveiled TruthIsIntheBinary, a free, cloud-based version of its Clarity binary code scanning software aimed at open source Linux IoT code.

Normally, we board-heads shy away from security software, but Insignary’s latest offering pushed all our buttons: Linux, free, open source, and “IoT security ticking time-bomb.” We were also slapped silly by the oracular sounding name.

Read more

Security: DNA, Marcus Hutchins, and Microsoft Windows in Hotels

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Slackware Security and Windows Insecurity

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Microsoft
Security
Slack
  • OpenJDK7 and Flash Player security updates (Aug ’17)

    On the blog of IcedTea release manager Andrew Hughes (aka GNU/Andrew) you can find the announcement for IcedTea 2.6.11 which builds OpenJDK 7u151_b01. This release includes the official July 2017 security fixes for Java 7. Note that the security updates for Java 8 were already pushed to my repository some time ago.

  • Kremlin's hackers 'wield stolen NSA exploit to spy on hotel guests in Europe, Mid East'

    Miscreants are using various techniques, including the leaked NSA EternalBlue exploit also wielded by the WannaCry malware, to hack into laptops and other devices used by government and business travelers, FireEye researchers declared on Friday.

Security: Canonical, CVE-2017-12836, GDPR, CIS, Fancy Bear and More

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Security

Change Control Security Fixes

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Development
Security
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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora: AnsibleFest SF 2017, So-called 'Open Organisation', and Pipewire

  • AnsibleFest SF 2017
    AnsibleFest was amazing, it always is. This has been my Third one and it's always one that I look forward to attending. The Ansible Events Team does an absolutely stellar job of putting things together and I'm extremely happy I was not only able to attend but that I was accepted as a speaker.
  • The eye-opening power of cultural difference
    Inclusivity is the quality of an open organization that allows and encourages people to join the organization and feel a connection to it. Practices aimed at enhancing inclusivity are typically those that welcome new participants to the organization and create an environment that makes them want to stay. When we talk about inclusivity, we should clarify something: Being "inclusive" is not the same as being "diverse." Diversity is a product of inclusivity; you need to create an inclusive community in order to become a diverse one, not the other way around. The degree to which your open organization is inclusive determines how it adapts to, responds to, and embraces diversity in order to improve itself. Interestingly enough, the best way to know which organizational changes will make your group more inclusive is to interact with the people you want to join your community.
  • Red Hat (RHT) PT Raised to $120 at Barclays Into Q2 Print
  • Barclays Holds To Rating And Raises Price Target On Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Volatility in Focus
  • Share Activity Lifted for Red Hat Inc (RHT) in Session
  • Red Hat Formally Rolls Out Pipewire For Being The "Video Equivalent of PulseAudio"
    Red Hat has quietly been working on PipeWire for years that is like the "video equivalent of PulseAudio" while now it's ready to make its initial debut in Fedora 27 and the project now has an official website. Pipewire has been talked about a few times in recent months while Red Hat's Christian Schaller wrote a blog post today about Launching Pipewire!

Ubuntu: Applications Survey, Mir support for Wayland, Canonical OpenStack Pike and Bright Computing

  • Results of the Ubuntu Desktop Applications Survey
    I had the distinct honor to deliver the closing keynote of the UbuCon Europe conference in Paris a few weeks ago. First off -- what a beautiful conference and venue! Kudos to the organizers who really put together a truly remarkable event. And many thanks to the gentleman (Elias?) who brought me a bottle of his family's favorite champagne, as a gift on Day 2 :-) I should give more talks in France!
  • Mir support for Wayland
    I’ve seen some confusion about how Mir is supporting Wayland clients on the Phoronix forums . What we are doing is teaching the Mir server library to talk Wayland in addition to its original client-server protocol. That’s analogous to me learning to speak another language (such as Dutch). This is not anything like XMir or XWayland. Those are both implementations of an X11 server as a client of a Mir or Wayland. (Xmir is a client of a Mir server or and XWayland is a client of a Wayland server.) They both introduce a third process that acts as a “translator” between the client and server.
  • Mir 1.0 Still Planned For Ubuntu 17.10, Wayland Support Focus
    Following our reporting of Mir picking up initial support for Wayland clients, Mir developer Alan Griffiths at Canonical has further clarified the Wayland client support. It also appears they are still planning to get Mir 1.0 released in time for Ubuntu 17.10.
  • Webinar: OpenStack Pike is here, what’s new?
    Sign up for our new webinar about the Canonical OpenStack Pike release. Join us to learn about the new features and how to upgrade from Ocata to Pike using OpenStack Charms.
  • Bright Computing Announces Support for Ubuntu
    right Computing, a global leader in cluster and cloud infrastructure automation software, today announced the general availability of Bright Cluster Manager 8.0 with Ubuntu. With this integration, organizations can run Bright Cluster Manager Version 8.0 on top of Ubuntu, to easily build, provision, monitor and manage Ubuntu high performance clusters from a single point of control, in both on-premises and cloud-based environments.

Linux Foundation Courses and Events

  • Linux Foundation LFCE Georgi Yadkov Shares His Certification Journey
    The Linux Foundation offers many resources for developers, users, and administrators of Linux systems. One of the most important offerings is its Linux Certification Program. The program is designed to give you a way to differentiate yourself in a job market that's hungry for your skills. How well does the certification prepare you for the real world? To illustrate that, The Linux Foundation is highlighting some of those who have recently passed the certification examinations. These testimonials should help you decide if either the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator or the Linux Foundation Certified Engineer certification is right for you. In this article, recently certified engineer Georgi Yadkov shares his experience.
  • Diversity Empowerment Summit Features Stories from Individual Persistence to Industry-wide Change
    Last week at The Linux Foundation’s first Diversity Empowerment Summit we heard from so many amazing speakers about how they are working to improve diversity in the tech industry. Leaders from companies including Comcast, DreamWorks, IBM, Rancher Labs, Red Hat and many others recounted their own personal struggles to fit in and advance as women and minorities in tech. And they gave us sage advice and practical tips on what women, minorities, and their allies can do to facilitate inclusion and culture change in open source and the broader tech community.
  • Open Source Summit: Day 1 in 5 minutes
    As you can see in the video below, the first day of the Open Source Summit was quite educational. My day was filled with clouds, containers, community building, flavors of Linux, and Linus Torvalds.

Early Linux 4.14 Kernel Benchmarks Are Looking Promising

I've begun running some Linux 4.14-rc1 kernel benchmarks and in some areas there appears to be nice gains with this in-development kernel. If you are behind on your Phoronix reading and don't know about all of the changes coming for this next kernel release -- which will also be an LTS kernel -- see our Linux 4.14 feature overview that was published this past weekend. Here are just some very early benchmarks while more are on the way. Read more