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Security

With This Tiny Box, You Can Anonymize Everything You Do Online

Filed under
OSS
Security

No tool in existence protects your anonymity on the Web better than the software Tor, which encrypts Internet traffic and bounces it through random computers around the world. But for guarding anything other than Web browsing, Tor has required a mixture of finicky technical setup and software tweaks. Now routing all your traffic through Tor may be as simple as putting a portable hardware condom on your ethernet cable.

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SEANux – a version of Linux from the Syrian Electronic Army

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

For now, consider me skeptical of SEANux. After all, back in early 2012 the so-called AnonymousOS was released, a purported new operating system from the Anonymous collective – only to reportedly be found ridden with trojan horses.

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Free Linux-Based Firewall Smoothwall Express 3.1 Is One of the Biggest Releases in Years

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Smoothwall Express is a free firewall that is based on a GNU/Linux kernel that comes with an easy to use interface. The latest version available is now 3.1 and its been in the works for a long time.

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BlackPhone Reviewed: Secure OS Inside a Generic Design and Not Quite Cheap

Filed under
Android
Security

“If privacy is important to you, the Blackphone is almost certainly what you’re after in a mobile device. Besides, you don’t have much choice currently. One thing I’m still coming to terms with, however, is the concept of selling peace of mind.

As Edward Snowden continues to leak information about how the NSA and other national government agencies were/are hoovering up every bit of personal data available to them, digital privacy has never been a hotter topic. With people wanting more control over how their data is handled, it was inevitable that products like the Blackphone would appear.”

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Tails OS Will Keep You Anonymous Online and Offline

Filed under
Security
Debian

There are many Linux distributions available right now that claim to protect the privacy of their users, but very few actually do it properly. Tails is definitively among the top ones, if not the best. Now, a new version has been made available, but it's just an RC for an upcoming release...

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Adobe Digital Editions 4 Spies on Users - Because of DRM

Filed under
Security

This column has written many times about the deep flaws of Digital Rights Management (DRM) - or "Digital Restrictions Management" as Richard Stallman rightly calls it - and the ridiculous laws that have been passed to "protect" it. What these effectively do is place copyright above basic rights - not just in the realm of copyright, but even in areas like privacy. Yesterday, another example of the folly of using DRM'd products came to light.

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The Source of Vulnerabilities, How Red Hat finds out about vulnerabilities.

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Red Hat Product Security track lots of data about every vulnerability affecting every Red Hat product. We make all this data available on our Measurement page and from time to time write various blog posts and reports about interesting metrics or trends.

One metric we’ve not written about since 2009 is the source of the vulnerabilities we fix. We want to answer the question of how did Red Hat Product Security first hear about each vulnerability?

Every vulnerability that affects a Red Hat product is given a master tracking bug in Red Hat bugzilla. This bug contains a whiteboard field with a comma separated list of metadata including the dates we found out about the issue, and the source. You can get a file containing all this information already gathered for every CVE. A few months ago we updated our ‘daysofrisk’ command line tool to parse the source information allowing anyone to quickly create reports like this one.

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USB Sees Many Changes For Linux 3.18 Kernel

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Security

Greg Kroah-Hartman sent in pull requests on Tuesday for the various kernel subsystems he maintains. The USB changes as he put it are "lots of little changes in here, all over the place", per his mailing list post.

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Ten Year Old "Critical" Bug Discovered In OpenBSD

Filed under
Security
BSD

While OpenBSD generally prides itself on being a secure, open-source operating system and focusing more on code corectness and security rather than flashy features, it turns out a potential security bug has been living within OpenBSD for the past decade.

Phoronix German ready "FRIGN" wrote in to Phoronix this afternoon with a subject entitled, "10 year old critical bug in OpenBSD discovered." He pointed out a post today about a bug discovered in OpenBSD's polling subsystem that could allow DDoS-style attacks on servers, "a critical bug in the polling-subsystem in OpenBSD has been uncovered which allows DDoS-attacks on servers using a non-standard derivation from the POSIX-standard in marking file descriptors non-readable when they should return EOF."

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Open source's "shallow bugs" theory hasn't been Shellshocked

Filed under
OSS
Security

It hasn't been a good year for open source. Not for its generally golden reputation for software quality and security, anyway. But in a rush to lay blame for the Bash Shellshock vulnerability (and previously for Heartbleed) some, like Roger Grimes, want to dismantle some of the cardinal tenets of open source, like the suggestion that "given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow."

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Leftovers: Gaming

Pro tip: Find tons of open-source Android software with F-Droid

If you're looking for truly open-source software for the Android platform, you don't have to do a ton of searching or check through licenses from within the Google Play Store. All you have to do is download a simple tool called F-Droid. With this tool, you can download and install apps (from quite a large listing) as easily as you can from the Google Play Store. You won't, however, find F-Droid in the Google Play Store. Instead, you have to download the .apk file and install it manually. Once it's installed, the rest is just a matter of searching for an app and tapping to install. Read more