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Security

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 & CentOS 6 Patched Against Spectre V4, Lazy FPU Flaws

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Red Hat
Security

Users of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and CentOS Linux 6 operating system series received important kernel security updates that patch some recently discovered vulnerabilities.

Now that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and CentOS Linux 7 operating system series were patched against the Spectre Variant 4 (CVE-2018-3639) security vulnerability, as well as the Lazy FPU State Save/Restore CPU flaw, it's time for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and CentOS Linux 6 to receive these important security updates, which users can now install them on their computers.

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Nintendo Found a Way to Patch an Unpatchable Coldboot Exploit in Nintendo Switch

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Security
Gadgets

If you plan on buying a Nintendo Switch gaming console to run Linux on it using the "unpatchable" exploit publicly disclosed a few months ago, think again because Nintendo reportedly fixed the security hole.

Not long ago, a team of hackers calling themselves ReSwitched publicly disclosed a security vulnerability in the Nvidia Tegra X1 chip, which they called Fusée Gelée and could allow anyone to hack a Nintendo Switch gaming console to install a Linux-based operating system and run homebrew code and apps using a simple trick.

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Security Leftovers

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Security

Debian GNU/Linux 9.5 "Stretch" Is Now Available with 100 Security Updates

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Security
Debian

Coming four months after the previous point release, Debian GNU/Linux 9.5 "Stretch" includes a total of 100 security update and 91 miscellaneous bugfixes for various core components and applications. However, this remains a point release and doesn't represent a new version of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series, which continues to be updated every day.

"This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available. Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 9 but only updates some of the packages included," reads today's announcement.

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Also: Debian 9.5 Released With Security Fixes, Updated Intel Microcode For Spectre V2

Updated Debian 9: 9.5 released

Security: Chip Defects and More

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Security
  • Chrome Web Browser Will Now Use 10% More RAM With Spectre Fix
  • Chrome 67 protects against Spectre hacks but gobbles more RAM

    The new feature basically splits the render process into separate tasks using out-of-process iframes, which makes it difficult for speculative execution exploits like Spectre to snoop on data.

  • Linux, malware and data breaches – what can we learn? [VIDEO] [Ed: The insecurity industry, which profits from selling snake oil for Windows, relishes in the idea that GNU/Linux is not secure]

    We thought we’d dig into the recent malware infestation at Gentoo Linux – how it happened, how Gentoo responded, and how to avoid this sort of crisis in your own network.

    We think Gentoo did a good job in a bad situation, and we can all learn something from that.

  • Speculative Load Hardening Lands In LLVM For Spectre V1 Mitigation

    The Speculative Load Hardening (SLH) effort that has been in development for months as a compiler-based automated Spectre Variant One mitigation technique has landed within LLVM trunk.

    Happening in time for LLVM 7.0 is this initial Speculative Load Hardening for x86/x86_64 while ARM developers are also working on leveraging SLH within LLVM for AArch64 (64-bit ARM) as well.

  • Senators press federal election officials on state cybersecurity

    “Many elections across the nation do not have auditable elections. They are done completely electronically,” Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) told the panel of witnesses at a hearing on election security preparedness convened by the Senate Rules and Administration Committee.

    Thomas Hicks, the head of the EAC, indicated that states decide whether they want to have auditable elections.

Security: Defective Processors, Malicious Proprietary Software and Cost of Bad Software

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Security

Security: Updates, DOD and Red Hat on "Security Hardening Rules"

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Red Hat
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Year-old router bug exploited to steal sensitive DOD drone, tank documents

     

    In May, a hacker perusing vulnerable systems with the Shodan search engine found a Netgear router with a known vulnerability—and came away with the contents of a US Air Force captain's computer. The purloined files from the captain—the officer in charge (OIC) of the 432d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron's MQ-9 Reaper Aircraft Maintenance Unit (AMU)at Creech Air Force Base, Nevada—included export-controlled information regarding Reaper drone maintenance.

  • Security Hardening Rules

    Many users of Red Hat Insights are familiar with the security rules we create to alert them about security vulnerabilities on their system, especially concerning high-profile issues such as Spectre/Meltdown or Heartbleed. In this post, I'd like to talk about the other category of security related rules, those related to security hardening.

    In all of the products we ship, we make a concerted effort to ship thoughtful, secure default settings to minimize the amount of configuration needed to do the work you want to do. With complex packages such as Apache httpd, however, every installation will require some degree of customization before it's ready for deployment to production, and with more complex configurations, there's a chance that a setting or the interaction between several settings can have security implications which aren't immediately evident. Additionally, sometimes systems are configured in a manner that aids rapid development, but those configurations aren't suitable for production environments.

    With our hardening rules, we detect some of the most common security-related configuration issues and provide context to help you understand the represented risks, as well as recommendations on how to remediate the issues.

Security: BGP Hijack Factory, IDN, Microsoft Windows Back Doors and Intel Defects

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Security
  • Shutting down the BGP Hijack Factory

    It started with a lengthy email to the NANOG mailing list on 25 June 2018: independent security researcher Ronald Guilmette detailed the suspicious routing activities of a company called Bitcanal, whom he referred to as a “Hijack Factory.” In his post, Ronald detailed some of the Portuguese company’s most recent BGP hijacks and asked the question: why Bitcanal’s transit providers continue to carry its BGP hijacked routes on to the global [I]nternet?

    This email kicked off a discussion that led to a concerted effort to kick this bad actor, who has hijacked with impunity for many years, off the [I]nternet.

  • Malformed Internationalized Domain Name (IDN) Leads to Discovery of Vulnerability in IDN Libraries

    The Punycode decoder is an implementation of the algorithm described in section 6.2 of RFC 3492. As it walks the input string, the Punycode decoder fills the output array with decoded code point values. The output array itself is typed to hold unsigned 32-bit integers while the Unicode code point space fits within 21 bits. This leaves a remainder of 11 unused bits that can result in the production of invalid Unicode code points if accidentally set. The vulnerability is enabled by the lack of a sanity check to ensure decoded code points are less than the Unicode code point maximum of 0x10FFFF. As such, for offending input, unchecked decoded values are copied directly to the output array and returned to the caller.

  • GandCrab ransomware adds NSA tools for faster spreading

    "It no longer needs a C2 server (it can operate in airgapped environments, for example) and it now spreads via an SMB exploit -- including on XP and Windows Server 2003 (along with modern operating systems)," Beaumont wrote in a blog post. "As far as I'm aware, this is the first ransomware true worm which spreads to XP and 2003 -- you may remember much press coverage and speculation about WannaCry and XP, but the reality was the NSA SMB exploit (EternalBlue.exe) never worked against XP targets out of the box."

  • Intel Discloses New Spectre Flaws, Pays Researchers $100K

    Intel disclosed a series of vulnerabilities on July 10, including new variants of the Spectre vulnerability the company has been dealing with since January.

    Two new Spectre variants were discovered by security researchers Vladimir Kiriansky and Carl Waldspurger, who detailed their findings in a publicly released research paper tilted, "Speculative Buffer Overflows: Attacks and Defenses."

    "We introduce Spectre1.1, a new Spectre-v1 variant that leverages speculative stores to create speculative buffer over-flows," the researchers wrote. "We also present Spectre 1.2 on CPUs that do not enforce read/write protections, speculative stores can overwrite read-only data and code pointers to breach sandboxes."

Security: Updates, GNU/Linux, Spectre and DRM

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Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Another Linux distro poisoned with malware

    Last time it was Gentoo, a hard-core, source-based Linux distribution that is popular with techies who like to spend hours tweaking their entire operating sytem and rebuilding all their software from scratch to wring a few percentage points of performance out of it.

  • Arch Linux AUR packages found to be laced with malware

    Three Arch Linux packages have been pulled from AUR (Arch User Repository) after they were discovered to contain malware. The PDF viewer acroread and two other packages that are yet to be named were taken over by a malicious user after they were abandoned by their original authors.

  • ​The return of Spectre

    The return of Spectre sounds like the next James Bond movie, but it's really the discovery of two new Spectre-style CPU attacks.

    Vladimir Kiriansky, a Ph.D. candidate at MIT, and independent researcher Carl Waldspurger found the latest two security holes. They have since published a MIT paper, Speculative Buffer Overflows: Attacks and Defenses, which go over these bugs in great detail. Together, these problems are called "speculative execution side-channel attacks."

    These discoveries can't really come as a surprise. Spectre and Meltdown are a new class of security holes. They're deeply embedded in the fundamental design of recent generations of processors. To go faster, modern chips use a combination of pipelining, out-of-order execution, branch prediction, and speculative execution to run the next branch of a program before it's called on. This way, no time is wasted if your application goes down that path. Unfortunately, Spectre and Meltdown has shown the chip makers' implementations used to maximize performance have fundamental security flaws.

  • Mercury Security Introduces New Linux Intelligent Controller Line

    Mercury Security, a leader in OEM access control hardware and part of HID Global, announces the launch of its next-generation LP intelligent controller platform built on the Linux operating system.

    The new controllers are said to offer advanced security and performance, plus extensive support for third-party applications and integrations. The controllers are based on an identical form factor that enables seamless upgrades for existing Mercury-based deployments, according to the company.

  • Latest Denuvo Version Cracked Again By One Solo Hacker On A Personal Mission

    Denuvo is... look, just go read this trove of backlinks, because I've written far too many of these intros to be able to come up with one that is even remotely original. Rather than plagiarize myself, let me just assume that most of you know that Denuvo is a DRM that was once thought to be invincible but has since been broken in every iteration developed, with cracking times often now down to days and hours rather than weeks or months. Key in this post is that much if not most of the work cracking Denuvo has been done by a single person going by the handle Voksi. Voksi is notable not only for their nearly singlehandedly torpedoing the once-daunting Denuvo DRM, but also for their devotion to the gaming industry and developers that do things the right way, even going so far as to help them succeed.

    Well, Voksi is back in the news again, having once again defeated the latest build of Denuvo DRM.

  • Latest Denuvo Anti-Piracy Protection Falls, Cracker ‘Voksi’ On Fire

    The latest variant of the infamous Denuvo anti-piracy system has fallen. Rising crack star Voksi is again the man behind the wheel, defeating protection on both Puyo Puyo Tetris and Injustice 2. The Bulgarian coder doesn't want to share too many of his secrets but informs TorrentFreak that he won't stop until Denuvo is a thing of the past, which he hopes will be sooner rather than later.

Chrome 67 to Counter Spectre on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS via Site Isolation

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Google
Security
  • Chrome 67 to Counter Spectre on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS via Site Isolation

    The Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities, discovered earlier this year, caught everyone off guard including hardware and software companies. Since then, several vendors have patched them, and today, Google Chrome implemented measures to protect the browser against Spectre. The exploit uses the a feature found in most CPUs to access parts of memory that should be off-limits to a piece of code and potentially discover the values stored in that memory. Effectively, this means that untrustworthy code may be able to read any memory in its process’s address space. In theory, a website could use such an attack to steal information from other websites via malicious JavaScript code. Google Chrome is implementing a technique known as site isolation to prevent any future Spectre-based attacks from leaking data.

  • Google Chrome is getting a Material Design revamp – here’s how to test the new features

    Google has been promising a Material Design revamp of its desktop Chrome web browser for quite some time – and now we have our first look.

    An update to the experimental Chrome Canary browser on Windows, Linux and Mac, offers a preview of what we can expect when Google builds the changes into the main browser later this year.

  • Google Chrome Gets A Big Material Design Makeover, Here's How To Try It On Windows, Linux And macOS

    Google's dominate Chrome web browser is set to receive a big Material Design makeover later this year. However, if you want to give a try right now, you can do so by downloading the latest build of Chrome Canary. For those not in the know, Canary is the developmental branch of Chrome where new features are tested before they roll out widely to the public.

    As you can see in the image below, this is a total revamp of the browser, with a completely new address bar and look for the tabs interface. Tabs have a more rounded shape and colors have been refreshed through the UI.

  • Chrome 67 features Site Isolation to counter Spectre on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS

    Following the disclosure of Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities earlier this year, the entire tech industry has been working to secure devices. In the current stable version of Chrome, Google has widely rolled out a security feature called Site Isolation to protect desktop browsers against Spectre.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get LibreOffice 6.1, Mozilla Firefox 61, and FFmpeg 4

The month of July 2018 was pretty busy for the openSUSE Tumbleweed development team, and the first two weeks of the month already delivered dozens of updates and security fixes. openSUSE developer Dominique Leuenberger reports that a total of nine snapshots have been released in July 2018 for the openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux operating system series, which follows a rolling release model where users install once and receive updates forever. As expected, these 9 snapshots bring numerous updates and bugfixes. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

Linux Kernel/Foundation

  • Linux Foundation Brings Power of Open Source to Energy Sector
    The Linux Foundation launched on July 12 its latest effort—LF Energy, an open-source coalition for the energy and power management sector. The LF Energy coalition is being backed by French transmission system operation RTE, Vanderbilt University and the European Network of Transmission System Operators (ENTSO-E). With LF Energy, the Linux Foundation is aiming to replicate the success it has seen in other sectors, including networking, automotive, financial services and cloud computing.
  • Marek Squeezes More Performance Out Of RadeonSI In CPU-Bound Scenarios
    AMD's leading open-source RadeonSI Gallium3D developer, Marek Olšák, sent out a new patch series this week aiming to benefit this Radeon OpenGL driver's performance in CPU-bound scenarios. The patch series is a set of command submission optimizations aimed to help trivial CPU-bound benchmarks to varying extents. In the very trivial glxgears, the patch series is able to improve the maximum frame-rates by around 10%.
  • Intel Sends In A Final Batch Of DRM Feature Updates Targeting Linux 4.19
    After several big feature pull requests of new "i915" Intel DRM driver features landing in DRM-Next for Linux 4.19, the Intel open-source developers have sent in what they believe to be their last batch of feature changes for queuing this next kernel cycle.