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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • Google: QuadRooter Threat Blocked On Most Android Devices
  • Linux Distributions Vulnerable to Cyber-Attacks: Report
  • Windows 10 Attack Surface Grows with Linux Support in Anniversary Update [Ed: Does Kaspersky not know CrowdStrike is a Microsoft-connected firm that spreads Linux FUD?]
  • Web pages, Word docs, PDF files, fonts – behold your latest keys to infecting Windows PCs

    Microsoft has fixed 38 CVE-listed security vulnerabilities in Edge, Internet Explorer, and Office, as well as high-profile flaws that have allowed researchers to circumvent Windows boot protections.

    None of the programming blunders were publicly disclosed or actively exploited in the wild prior to today's patch release.

  • If census site was taken down after DDoS attack it wasn't prepared: expert

    The attack against the census website that resulted in it being taken down last night appears, at face value, to have been nothing more than the standard attack perpetrated against countless sites every day by everyone from children to malcontents with an axe to grind, an expert says.

    That the site was attacked is not in the least bit surprising, security adviser Troy Hunt told Fairfax Media, but it was unexpected that an attack of this kind would result in the site going down.

  • Census 2016: ABS needs to provide proof of DDoS

    Technical people like him are what we need to cut through all the bulldust. One person who is an expert in this art is Craig Sanders, a systems administrator of many decades, and one who can speak plainly. Many years ago, following a major distributed denial of service of attack on the Internet's root name servers, he was one who educated me on the phenomenon. This time was no different with Sanders; he calmly and clearly pointed me in the direction of the evidence that was needed.

    If the census website crashed due to foreign intervention — either through a denial of service or a distributed denial of service — how is it that none of the major security companies around the world did not notice it? You would need an attack of some magnitude to take down the ABS census site.

  • Researchers crack Microsoft feature, say encryption backdoors similarly crackable [Ed: by design]

    Researchers who uncovered a security key that protects Windows devices as they boot up say their discovery is proof that encryption backdoors do not work.

    The pair of researchers, credited by their hacker nicknames MY123 and Slipstream, found the cryptographic key protecting a feature called Secure Boot.

    They believe the discovery highlights a problem with requests law enforcement officials have made for technology companies to provide police with some form of access to otherwise virtually unbreakable encryption that might be used by criminals.

    “Microsoft implemented a ‘secure golden key’ system. And the golden keys got released from [Microsoft's] own stupidity,” wrote the researchers in their report, in a section addressed by name to the FBI.

    “Now, what happens if you tell everyone to make a ‘secure golden key’ system? Hopefully you can add 2+2.”

    Secure Boot is a built into the firmware of computer — software unique to different types of hardware that exists outside the operating system and is used to boot the OS.

Security News

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Security
  • Containerized Security: The Next Evolution of Virtualization?

    We in the security industry have gotten into a bad habit of focusing the majority of our attention and marketing dollars on raising awareness of the latest emerging threats and new technologies being developed to detect them. One just has to look at the headlines or spend fifteen minutes walking the show floor at a major security conference to see this trend. However, while we are focusing on what all the bad guys are doing, we’ve taken the eye off the ball of where our infrastructure business is going.

  • SDN Security Researchers State Their Case at Black Hat

    So say two of his grad students, Seungsoo Lee and Changhoon Yoon (left and right, respectively, in the photo above). But along with Shin, who’s now an assistant professor at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Kaist) and a research associate at the Open Networking Foundation (ONF), they’re hoping the industry is ready to start looking at the vulnerabilities that SDN introduces.

  • Widespread Linux Flaw Allows TCP Session Hijacking, Termination
  • Bungling Microsoft singlehandedly proves that golden backdoor keys are a terrible idea [Ed: Microsoft and backdoor should become synonymous. At every level, online and offline, Microsoft products booby-trapped with backdoors.]

    Microsoft leaked the golden keys that unlock Windows-powered tablets, phones and other devices sealed by Secure Boot – and is now scrambling to undo the blunder.

    These skeleton keys can be used to install non-Redmond operating systems on locked-down computers. In other words, on devices that do not allow you to disable Secure Boot even if you have administrator rights – such as ARM-based Windows RT tablets – it is now possible to sidestep this block and run, say, GNU/Linux or Android.

    What's more, it is believed it will be impossible for Microsoft to fully revoke the leaked keys.

    And perhaps most importantly: it is a reminder that demands by politicians and crimefighters for special keys, which can be used by investigators to unlock devices in criminal cases, will inevitably jeopardize the security of everyone.

    Microsoft's misstep was uncovered by two researchers, MY123 and Slipstream, who documented their findings here in a demoscene-themed writeup published on Tuesday. Slip believes Microsoft will find it impossible to undo its leak.

  • Microsoft Creates Backdoor In Windows, Accidentally Leaks UEFI Secure Boot Keys

    Two researchers reported that Microsoft accidentally compromised the golden keys to its UEFI Secure boot feature.

  • Can Copperhead OS fix Android's security problems?

Canonical Patches Multiple Kernel Vulnerabilities in All Supported Ubuntu OSes

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Security
Ubuntu

Today, August 10, 2016, Canonical published several security notices to inform Ubuntu Linux users about new kernel updates for their distributions, patching several vulnerabilities discovered recently.

Read more

Internet of Insecurity

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Security
  • Linux TCP flaw enables remote attacks

    Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, say they have found a weakness in the transmission control protocol (TCP) used by Linux since late 2012 which allows the remote hijacking of Internet communications.

  • Serious security threat to many Internet users highlighted
  • Your 'Smart' Thermostat Is Now Vulnerable To Ransomware

    We've noted time and time again how the much ballyhooed "internet of things" is a privacy and security dumpster fire, and the check is about to come due. Countless companies and "IoT" evangelists jumped head first into the profit party, few bothering to cast even a worried look over at the reality that basic security and privacy standards hadn't come along for the ride. The result has been an endless parade of not-so-smart devices and appliances that are busy either leaking your personal details or potentially putting your life at risk.

    Of course, the Internet of Things hype machine began with smart thermostats and the sexy, Apple-esque advertising of Nest. The fun and games didn't last however, especially after several botched firmware updates resulted in people being unable to heat or cool their homes (relatively essential for a thermostat).

Security News

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Security
  • No, 900 million Android devices are not at risk from the 'Quadrooter' monster

    Guys, gals, aardvarks, fishes: I'm running out of ways to say this. Your Android device is not in any immediate danger of being taken over a super-scary malware monster.

    It's a silly thing to say, I realize, but we go through this same song and dance every few months: Some company comes out with a sensational headline about how millions upon millions of Android users are in danger (DANGER!) of being infected (HOLY HELL!) by a Big, Bad Virus™ (A WHAT?!) any second now. Countless media outlets (cough, cough) pick up the story and run with it, latching onto that same sensational language without actually understanding a lick about Android security or the context that surrounds it.

    To wit: As you've no doubt seen by now, our latest Android malware scare du jour is something an antivirus software company called Check Point has smartly dubbed "Quadrooter" (a name worthy of Batman villain status if I've ever heard one). The company is shouting from the rooftops that 900 million (MILLION!) users are at risk of data loss, privacy loss, and presumably also loss of all bladder control -- all because of this hell-raising "Quadrooter" demon and its presence on Qualcomm's mobile processors.

  • 900 Million Androids Could Be Easy Prey for QuadRooter Exploits
  • Annoying "Open PDF in Edge" Default Option Puts Windows 10 Users at Risk

    Microsoft released today its monthly security patch, and one of the five security bulletins labeled as critical was a remote code execution (RCE) flaw in its standard PDF rendering library that could be exploited when opening PDF files.

Security News

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Security News

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Security
  • Computers That Don't Track You

    Todd Weaver, the Founder and CEO of Purism shows Leo Laporte and Aaron Newcomb the Librem line of secure Linux computers. They discuss PureOS the operating system based on Debian, and how the computers are sourced and built. Plus, he talks about their line of no-carrier, encrypted smartphone coming next year.

  • The state of cyber security: we’re all screwed

    When cybersecurity professionals converged in Las Vegas last week to expose vulnerabilities and swap hacking techniques at Black Hat and Defcon, a consistent theme emerged: the internet is broken, and if we don’t do something soon, we risk permanent damage to our economy.

    “Half of all Americans are backing away from the net due to fears regarding security and privacy,” longtime tech security guru Dan Kaminsky said in his Black Hat keynote speech, citing a July 2015 study by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration. “We need to go ahead and get the internet fixed or risk losing this engine of beauty.”

  • Oh, not again: US reportedly finds new secret software in VW diesels [Ed: cannot trust proprietary software]

    Volkswagen first ended up in this situation after it admitted to intentionally installing secret software in its 2.0-liter diesels. That software curtailed nitrogen oxide emissions in lab-testing environments, but once on the road, the diesels would pollute well in excess of legal limitations. It was allegedly used in response to ever-stricter emissions regulations.

  • Chinese Hunting Chinese Over POP3 In Fjord Country

    More specifically, here at bsdly.net we've been seeing attempts at logging in to the pop3 mail retrieval service using usernames that sound distinctively like Chinese names, and the attempts originate almost exclusively from Chinese networks.

  • 'Sauron' spyware attacking targets in Belgium, China, Russia and Sweden

    A previously unknown hacking group called Strider has been conducting cyber espionage against selected targets in Belgium, China, Russia and Sweden, according to Symantec.

    The security firm suggested that the product of the espionage would be of interest to a nation state's intelligence services.

    Strider uses malware known as Remsec that appears primarily to have been designed for espionage, rather than as ransomware or any other nefarious software.

    Symantec has linked Strider with a group called Flamer which uses similar attack techniques and malware.

    The Lord of the Rings reference is deliberate as the Remsec stealth tool contains a reference to Sauron, the necromancer and main protagonist in a number of Tolkien's stories.

    "Strider has been active since at least October 2011. The group has maintained a low profile until now and its targets have been mainly organisations and individuals that would be of interest to a nation state's intelligence services," said Symantec in a blog post.

  • New MacBooks expected to feature Touch ID power button as well as OLED touch-panel [iophk: "as UID or password? Former is ok latter is insecure"]

    A source who has provided reliable information in the past has informed us that the new MacBook Pro models, expected to be launched in the fall, will feature a Touch ID power button as well as the previously-reported OLED touch-sensitive function keys.

  • it’s hard work printing nothing

    It all starts with a bug report to LibreSSL that the openssl tool crashes when it tries to print NULL. This bug doesn’t manifest on OpenBSD because libc will convert NULL strings to ”(null)” when printing. However, this behavior is not required, and as observed, it’s not universal. When snprintf silently accepts NULL, that simply leads to propagating the error.

  • London's Met Police has missed the Windows XP escape deadline [Ed: known problem, London's police is a prisoner of NSA and also China, Russia etc. [1, 2]]

    London’s Metropolitan Police has missed its deadline to dump Windows XP, with tens of thousands of copper still running the risky OS.

    The force, on the front line against terrorist threats and criminals in the capital city, is running Windows XP on around 27,000 PCs.

    At last count, in May 2015, the Met had a total of 35,640 PCs, with 34,920 of them running XP. Policemen set themselves a deadline of March 2016 to finish migrating to Windows 8.1.

    London Mayor Sadiq Khan, however, has apparently now revealed that just 8,000 of the force’s PCs have moved to Windows 8.1 since last September. The target is for another 6,000 by the end of September 2016.

    Khan provided the update in response to a question from Conservative Greater London Assembly member Andrew Boff.

  • Met Police still running Windows XP on 27,000 computers [iophk: "forget XP, Windows in general is dangerously out of date"]

    LONDON BOYS IN BLUE the Metropolitan Police may be armed with tasers and extendable batons, but they are backed up by Windows XP in a lot of cases, which is a really bad thing.

    Windows XP no longer gets official security updates, and Microsoft sees it as the sort of thing that should be scraped off shoes before walking on the carpet.

    The company will let people pay to keep using it, but only on a case-by-case basis. We do not know the police arrangement with Microsoft, but the Met needs to accelerate the updating of its computer systems as it puts Londoners' information at risk, according to London Assembly member Andrew Boff.

Security News

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