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Security

KDE Applications 15.12.2 Released for KDE Plasma 5.5 with over 30 Bugfixes

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KDE
Security

Just a few moments ago, February 16, 2016, KDE had the pleasure of announcing the release and general availability of the second maintenance build in the stable KDE Applications 15.12 series.

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Top 5 Best Security-Centric Linux Distributions Of 2016

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GNU
Linux
Security

Staying anonymous on the Internet might not necessarily mean the same as surfing the web safely but rather keeping yourself safe from prying eyes that may otherwise take advantage of the vulnerability of your system thereby exposing you and your data for whomever might just be up for the grabbing – especially some hacker snooping around for sensitive data to hoard (particularly if you’re being targeted) and use for otherwise evil purposes that can have some serious effects on the violated individual.

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • Russian cyberspy group uses simple yet effective Linux Trojan

    A cyberespionage group of Russian origin known as Pawn Storm is infecting Linux systems with a simple but effective Trojan program that doesn't require highly privileged access.

  • Security update for Chromium 48

    Google released an update for Chrome/Chromium – their version 48 of the browser is now at “48.0.2564.109“. The chromium sources are still not available six days after the announcement, even though the official Chrome binary distributions were available right from the start. I think that this is inexcusable for a big company like Google, but this is not the first time that their autobots falter and no one cares enough to fix the release process. Notwithstanding some complaints by fellow application packagers.

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Friday's security updates
  • Internet Providers to Use Private Routers as Public Hotspots

    The Juniper report highlighted the consumer benefits that the policy offers, such as free or reduced-fee access to the operator’s homespot network.
    At least one in three home routers will be used as public WiFi hotspots by 2017, and the total installed base of such dual-use routers will reach 366 million globally by the end of 2020, according to a report from Juniper Research.

  • Will you be my cryptovalentine?

    Over the last few year Free Software Foundation Europe runs a campaign called "I love Free Software Day". It's an opportunity to share your appreciation (or love) with the developers of your favorite Free Software project. So after you are done reading this post, choose your favorite project and send its developer(s) an appreciation email.

    Last year Zak Rogoff , had a great similar idea. On a post he wrote he suggested we use the Valentine's Day as an opportunity to use Free Software in order to setup secure and private communications with our significant other.

  • Pwn2Own Hacking Contest Returns as Joint HPE-Trend Micro Effort

    Over a half million dollars in prize money is up for grabs as the Zero Day Initiative browser hacking contest continues even as corporate ownership shifts.
    The annual Pwn2Own browser hacking competition that takes place at the CanSecWest conference is one of the premier security events in any given year, as security researchers attempt to demonstrate in real time zero-day exploits against modern Web browsers. This year there was initial concern that the event wouldn't happen, as the Zero Day Initiative (ZDI), which is the primary sponsor of Pwn2Own, is currently in a state of transition.

  • Kaspersky Researcher Shows How He Hacked His Hospital While Sitting In His Car

    When we visit a hospital, we put our complete trust in our doctor and the medical equipment that he/she uses. With advancement in technology, these equipment have become more complex and interconnected. Sadly, ensuring standard cybersecurity measures is not a top priority of the medical professionals. This fact was recently outlined by a Kaspersky security researcher who hacked a hospital while sitting in his car.

  • Amazon Cloud is Prepared for the Zombie Apocalypse

    There are a number of reasons why an Amazon Web Services (AWS) user might need to violate the acceptable terms of use - including the onset of a zombie apocalypse.

    Amazon updated its terms of service this week alongside its Lumberyard gaming development platform, with a new provision about acceptable use in connection with safety-critical systems.

Fysbis: The Linux Backdoor Used by Russian Hackers

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Linux
Security

Fysbis (or Linux.BackDoor.Fysbis) is a new malware family that targets Linux machines, on which it sets up a backdoor that allows the malware's author to spy on victims and carry out further attacks.

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Security advisories for Thursday
  • These Vigilante Hackers Aim To Hack 200,000 Routers To Make Them More Secure

    Remember the white hat hackers — The White Team — responsible for creating the Linux.Wifatch malware last October? The same hackers are now planning to take over Lizard Squad’s botnet of infected IoT devices in an attempt to shut down their operations.

  • Skimmers Hijack ATM Network Cables

    If you have ever walked up to an ATM to withdraw cash only to decide against it after noticing a telephone or ethernet cord snaking from behind the machine to a jack in the wall, your paranoia may not have been misplaced: ATM maker NCR is warning about skimming attacks that involve keypad overlays, hidden cameras and skimming devices plugged into the ATM network cables to intercept customer card data.

Three nginx Vulnerabilities Closed in Ubuntu OSes

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Security

Canonical published details in a security notice regarding a few nginx vulnerabilities that have been identified in Ubuntu 15.10, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS operating systems.

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Security Leftovers

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Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

The Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative Working with White House on Cybersecurity National Action Plan

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Linux
Security

The White House today announced its Cybersecurity National Action Plan (CNAP), which includes a series of steps and programs to enhance cybersecurity capabilities within the Federal Government and across the country. In the proposal, the White House announced collaboration with The Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative(CII) to better secure Internet "utilities" such as open-source software, protocols and standards.

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More in Tux Machines

GhostBSD 10.3 ALPHA1 is now ready for Testing

Yes we skip 10.2 for 10.3 since was FreeBSD 10.3 was coming we thought we should wait for 10.3. This is the first ALPHA development release for testing and debugging for GhostBSD 10.3, only as MATE been released yet which is available on SourceForge and for the amd64 and i386 architectures. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu-based Smartphones And Tablets Sound Good, On Paper, But...Do They Make Any Sense?
    As I previously stated in a recent article, I'm a huge fan of Ubuntu as a desktop operating system. It's friendly, reliable, consumes little resources and is largely virus-free.
  • Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ expected to be based on Ubuntu 16.04
    Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ coming soon, to be based on Ubuntu 16.04 and have plenty of new features
  • BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet - The heat is on
    Some investments are financial. Some are emotional. When it comes to Linux on tablets, my motives are mostly of the latter kind. I was super-excited to learn BQ was launching a tablet with Ubuntu, something that I have been waiting for a good solid three years now. We had the phone released last spring, and now there's a tablet. The cycle is almost complete. Now, as you know, I was only mildly pleased with the Ubuntu phone. It is a very neat product, but it is not yet as good as the competitors, across all shades of the usability spectrum. But this tablet promises a lot. Full HD, desktop-touch continuum, seamless usage model, and more. Let us have a look.
  • Kubuntu-16.04 — a review
    The kubuntu implementation of Plasma 5 seems to work quite well. It’s close to what I am seeing in other implementations. It includes the Libre Office software, rather than the KDE office suite. But most users will prefer that anyway. I’m not a big fan of the default menu. But the menu can easily be switched to one of the alternative forms. I’ve already done that, and am preferring the “launcher based on cascading popup menus”. If you are trying kubuntu, I suggest you experiment with the alternative formats to see which you prefer.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Review: Very Stable & Improved, Buggy Software Center, Though
    In almost all the occasions that I tested Ubuntu LTS releases, quite rightly so, they’ve always worked better than the non-LTS releases. And this Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, the 6th of such release is no exception. This one actually is even more impressive than the others because it has addressed some security related issues and even although not critical, subtle issues that I mentioned in the review. As far as the performance was concerned, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was only largely outperformed by the memory usage where there is a large increase in memory usage. Other than that, those numbers look pretty good to me. That ‘.deb’ file issues with the Software Center is the only major concern that I can come up with. But I’m sure it’ll be fixed very soon.

Devuan Beta, Stumbling Tumbleweed, Ubuntu Too

Today in Linux news Debian-fork Devuan is forging ahead with its plans to create a distribution offering init freedom by releasing a beta for testers. Douglas DeMaio posted today that openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have halted due to glibc upgrade rebuilds. Dedoimedo reviewed the BQ Aquaris M10 and liliputing.com posted of another Ubuntu laptop for sale. And finally, the Hectic Geek reviewed Ubuntu 16.04 and Neil Rickert reviewed Kubuntu 16.04. Read more Also: Devuan releases beta Devuan Jessie - beta release announcement

Devuan Jessie beta released

dear Init Freedom Lovers, once again the Veteran Unix Admins salute you. As promised two years ago with the first declaration of Exodus from Debian, today we can proudly state: we do not go gentle into that good night. Now has come the time to announce the Beta release of Devuan. Debian GNU+Linux is a fork of Debian without systemd, on its way to become much more than that. This Beta release marks an important milestone towards the sustainability and the continuation of Devuan as an universal base distribution. Read more Also: Beta Released Of Devuan, The Systemd-Free Version Of Debian