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Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • Cryptostalker, a Tool to Detect Crypto-Ransomware on Linux

    A while back, we stumbled upon an interesting GitHub repo dubbed randumb, which included an example called Cryptostalker, advertised as a tool to detect crypto-ransomware on Linux.

    Cryptostalker and the original project randumb are the work of Sean Williams, a developer from San Francisco. Mr. Williams wanted to create a tool that monitored the filesystem for newly written files, and if the files contained random data, the sign of encrypted content, and they were written at high speed, it would alert the system's owner.

  • Google slings critical patch at exploited Linux kernel root hole

    Google has shipped an out-of-band patch for Android shuttering a bug that is under active exploitation to root devices.

    The vulnerability (CVE-2015-1805) affects all Android devices running Linux kernel versions below 3.18.

  • Everything is fine, nothing to see here!

    Today everyone who is REALLY, I mean REALLY REALLY good at security got there through blood sweat and tears. Nobody taught them what they know, they learned it on their own. Many of us didn't have training when we were learning these things. Regardless of this though, if training is fantastic, why does it seem there is a constant march toward things getting worse instead of better? That tells me we're not teaching the right skills to the right people. The skills of yesterday don't help you today, and especially don't help tomorrow. By its very definition, training can only cover the topics of yesterday.

  • Inside the Starburst-sized box that could save the Internet

    Cybercrime is costing us millions. Hacks drain the average American firm of $15.4 million per year, and, in the resulting panic, companies often spend more than $1.9 million to resolve a single attack. It’s time to face facts: Our defenses aren’t strong enough to keep the hackers out.

  • Utah’s Online Caucus Gives Security Experts Heart Attacks

    On Tuesday, registered Republicans in Utah who want to participate in their state’s caucus will have the option to either head to a polling station and cast a vote in person or log onto a new website and choose their candidate online. To make this happen, the Utah GOP paid more than $80,000 to the London-based company Smartmatic, which manages electronic voting systems and internet voting systems in 25 countries and will run the Utah GOP caucus system.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Snowden: “I Used Free And Open Source Software Like Debian And TOR. I Didn’t Trust Microsoft”

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GNU
Linux
Security
Debian

At the Free Software Foundation’s LibrePlanet2016 conference on Saturday, NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden participated in a discussion regarding free software and security. He joined the talk via video conferencing from Russia.

Edward Snowden told that he was able to disclose the secrets of American government and its projects of mass surveillance using free software. The event was being held in an MIT lecture hall and this statement drew a wide round of applause.

Praising the likes of Debian, Tails, and TOR, he said — “What happened in 2013 couldn’t have happened without free software.”

Read more

Also: OS X and Linux rise in developer market to threaten Windows

Antivirus Live CD 17.0-0.99.1 Uses ClamAV 0.99.1 to Clean Your PCs of Viruses

Filed under
Linux
Security

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki today informs Softpedia about the immediate availability for download of a new build of his Antivirus Live CD tool based on the latest 4MLinux and ClamAV projects.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Leopard Flower firewall – Protect your bytes

    Several months ago, I decided to explore a somewhat obscure topic of outbound per-application firewall control in Linux. A concept that Windows users are well familiar with, it’s been around for ages, providing Windows folks with a heightened sense of – if not practical factual – protection against rogues residing in their system and trying to phone home.

    In Linux, things are a little different, but with the growing flux of Windows converts arriving at the sandy shores of open-source, the notion of need for outbound control of applications has also risen, giving birth to software designed to allay fears if not resolve problems. My first attempt to play with Leopard Flower and Douane was somewhat frustrating. Now, I’m going to revisit the test, focusing only on the former.

    [...]

    Leopard Flower firewall is an interesting concept. Misplaced, though, for most parts. It caters to a Windows need that does not exist on Linux, and to be frank, has no place in the Microsoft world either. Then, it also tries to resolve a problem of control and knowledge by requiring the user to exercise the necessary control and knowledge. But if they had those to begin with, they wouldn’t need to dabble in per-application firewalls. Furthermore, the software is still fairly immature. There are at least half a dozen little things and changes that can be implemented to make lpfw more elegant, starting with installation and followed by service and GUI model, prompts, robustness, and a few others.

  • Critical bug in libotr could open users of ChatSecure, Adium, Pidgin to compromise
  • Clair 1.0 Brings Advances in Container Security

    CoreOS pushes the open-source container security project to the 1.0 milestone and production stability.
    As container use grows, there is an increasing need to understand from a security perspective what is actually running in a container. That's the goal of CoreOS' Clair container security project, which officially hits the 1.0 milestone today, in an effort to help organizations validate container application security.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Friday's security updates
  • At pwn2Own, Chrome, Flash and Other Key Tools Proved Vulnerable
  • Motor Vehicles Increasingly Vulnerable to Remote Exploits

    As previously reported by the media in and after July 2015, security researchers evaluating automotive cybersecurity were able to demonstrate remote exploits of motor vehicles. The analysis demonstrated the researchers could gain significant control over vehicle functions remotely by exploiting wireless communications vulnerabilities. While the identified vulnerabilities have been addressed, it is important that consumers and manufacturers are aware of the possible threats and how an attacker may seek to remotely exploit vulnerabilities in the future. Third party aftermarket devices with Internet or cellular access plugged into diagnostics ports could also introduce wireless vulnerabilities.

  • Malvertising hits BBC, Newsweek, NYT and MSN

    Links to malware inside online advertising bypassed the security systems of the advertising serving companies and distributed ransomware to unsuspecting ‘link clickers’.

    Earlier this week major websites including BBC, Newsweek, New York Times and MSN ‘hosted’ malvertising on their sites that has been credited as the largest of attack of its type for two years. Previously Google’s DoubleClick and Zedo ad servers were ‘infected’ and YouTube, Amazon and Yahoo websites used advertisements served from them.

    Although ad serving networks try to filter out malicious ones, occasionally altered ones’ slip in. On a high-traffic site, this means a large pool of potential victims. Websites that serve the ads are usually unaware of the problem.

    AppNexus, one of the ad servers said it has an anti-malware detection system called Sherlock it uses to screen ads and also uses a filtering product from a third-party vendor. "We devote considerable financial resources to safeguarding our customers. Unfortunately, bad actors also invest considerably in developing new forms of malware,” said Josh Zeitz, vice president of communications.

  • Security Researcher Goes Missing After Investigating Bangladesh Bank Cyber-Heist

    Tanvir Hassan Zoha, 34, security researcher, has gone missing just days after accusing Bangladesh's central bank officials of negligence, which facilitated the theft of over $81 million from the country's oversea accounts.

Linux Kernel 3.12.57 LTS Out Now with ALSA, EFI, and Xen Improvements, Bugfixes

Filed under
Linux
Security

On March 18, 2016, kernel developer Jiri Slaby announced the release of the fifty-seventh maintenance build of the long-term supported Linux 3.12 kernel series.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Locky Ransomware Spreading in Massive Spam Attack

    Trustwave said over the last seven days, malware-laced spam has represented 18 percent of total spam collected in its honeypots. Trustwave said malware-infected spam typically represent less than 2 percent of total spam. The recent increase to 18 percent is almost entirely traced to ransomware JavaScript downloaders. Campaigns aren’t continuous, Trustwave reported, but are delivered in hour-long bursts.

  • Considering Docker? Consider Security First

    Containers started making a big splash in IT and dev operations starting in 2014. The benefits of flexibility and go-live times, among many others, are almost undeniable. But large enterprises considering using a container platform for development or IT operations should pause and consider security first.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Big-name sites hit by rash of malicious ads spreading crypto ransomware [Updated]

    Mainstream websites, including those published by The New York Times, the BBC, MSN, and AOL, are falling victim to a new rash of malicious ads that attempt to surreptitiously install crypto ransomware and other malware on the computers of unsuspecting visitors, security firms warned.

    The tainted ads may have exposed tens of thousands of people over the past 24 hours alone, according to a blog post published Monday by Trend Micro. The new campaign started last week when "Angler," a toolkit that sells exploits for Adobe Flash, Microsoft Silverlight, and other widely used Internet software, started pushing laced banner ads through a compromised ad network.

    According to a separate blog post from Trustwave's SpiderLabs group, one JSON-based file being served in the ads has more than 12,000 lines of heavily obfuscated code. When researchers deciphered the code, they discovered it enumerated a long list of security products and tools it avoided in an attempt to remain undetected.

  • VMware fixes XSS flaws in vRealize for Linux

    VMware patched two cross-site scripting issues in several editions of its vRealize cloud software. These flaws could be exploited in stored XSS attacks and could result in the user's workstation being compromised.

  • VMware patches severe XSS flaws in vRealize software

    VMware has patched two serious vulnerabilities in the firm's vRealize software which could lead to remote code execution and the compromise of business workstations.

    In a security advisory posted on Tuesday, the Palo Alto, California-based firm said the "important" vulnerabilities are found within the VMware vRealize Automation and VMware vRealize Business Advanced and Enterprise software platforms.

  • Get ready to patch Git servers, clients – nasty-looking bugs surface

    A chap who found two serious security bugs in Git servers and clients has urged people to patch their software.

    The flaws are present in Git including the 2.x, 1.9 and 1.7 branches, meaning the vulnerabilities have been lurking in the open-source version control tool for years.

    It is possible these two programming blunders can be potentially exploited to corrupt memory or execute malicious code on remote servers and clients. To do so, an attacker would have to craft a Git repository with a tree of files that have extremely long filenames, and then push the repo to a vulnerable server or let a vulnerable client clone it from the internet.

Ubuntu 15.10 for Raspberry Pi 2 Kernel Patched by Canonical to Fix Seven Issues

Filed under
Security

On March 15, 2016, we reported on the fact that Canonical published several new Ubuntu Security Notices to inform the community about important kernel updates for the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 15.10 operating systems.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices

  • MediaTek Announces An Interesting Deca-Core ARM Dev Board
    The folks at MediaTek in Hsinchu announced the Helio X20 Development Board today as the first development board using a tri-cluster, deca-core design. As implied by the name, this developer board is using the Helio X20 SoC, which features a tri-cluster CPU architecture and ten processing cores: two Cortex-A72 at 2.3GHz, four Cortex-A53 cores @ 2.0GHz, and four Cortex-A53 cores at 1.4GHz. Depending upon system load, the relevant/needed cores will power up. The X20 uses ARM's Mali graphics, supports 2 x LPDDR3 POP memory, and has integrated 802.11ac WiFi.
  • Voice control your embedded systems with 20 lines of software code
    Speech recognition software technology provider Sensory is offering TrulyHandsfree SDK to embed voice enabled functions in your embedded systems software. TrulyHandsfree SDK supports fixed triggers, user enrolled triggers and commands phrase spotting technology.
  • No SSD Storage On Raspberry Pi 3? Try MinnowMax Turbot Board
    The fact that you can not use an SSD storage device with the Raspberry Pi is a huge drawback. Devices that use the Raspberry pie consume a lot of storage. Devices like drones etc could use the onboard SSD storage. Too bad that the Raspberry pi 3 does not support it. But no worries have you head of the MinnowMax Turbot board?

Server Administration

  • Why Container Skills Aren't a Priority in Hiring Open Source Pros (Yet)
    It should come as no surprise that open source training and hiring is typically predicated on what skills are trending in tech. As an example, Big Data, cloud and security are three of the most in-demand skillsets today, which explains why more and more open source professionals look to develop these particular skillsets and why these professionals are amongst the most sought after. One skillset that employers have not found as useful as professionals is container management.
  • All Hail the New Docker Swarm
    Unfortunately, I’m not able to attend DockerCon US this year, but I will be keeping up with the announcements. As part of the Docker Captains program, I was given a preview of Docker 1.12 including the new Swarm integration which is Docker’s native clustering/orchestration solution (also known as SwarmKit, but that’s really the repo/library name). And it’s certainly a big change. In this post I’ll try to highlight the changes and why they’re important.
  • Apache Spark Creator Matei Zaharia Describes Structured Streaming in Spark 2.0 [Video]
    Apache Spark has been an integral part of Mesos from its inception. Spark is one of the most widely used big data processing systems for clusters. Matei Zaharia, the CTO of Databricks and creator of Spark, talked about Spark's advanced data analysis power and new features in its upcoming 2.0 release in his MesosCon 2016 keynote.

The heartbeat of open source projects can be heard with GitHub data

GitHub released charts last week that tell a story about the heartbeat of a few open source, giving insights into activity, productivity and collaboration of software development. Why are these important? Enterprises increasingly define software development as a top priority to gain competitive advantage or defend against disruption. They often turn to open source software because it is fast and agile. Enterprise IT decision makers should understand GitHub because it is the backbone of most open source projects. Read more

Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator: Lorenzo Paglia

The Linux Foundation offers many resources for developers, users, and administrators of Linux systems, including its Linux Certification Program. This program is designed to give you a way to differentiate yourself in a job market that's hungry for your skills. To illustrate how well these certifications prepare you for the real world, this series features some of those who have recently passed the certification exams. These testimonials should help you decide if either the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) or the Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE) certification is right for you. In this installment, we talk with LFCS Lorenzo Paglia. Read more