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Security

Google Android chief: Android may be open, but it is not less secure

Filed under
Android
Google
Security

Does 'open' mean 'lack of security'?

According to Google, no. Instead, an open platform is the best path to take in order to make a platform as impermeable to threats as possible.

On Thursday, FrAndroid reported that Google's head of the Android division, Sundar Pichai, responded in a very candid way when asked about the operating system's security at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain.

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Deep Black: More details on Boeing’s new secure Android smartphone

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Android
Linux
Security

Black is based on a proprietary security architecture that Boeing calls "PureSecure." Like Samsung’s Knox platform, it has a “trusted boot” mode that can detect and thwart any attempt to root the device—or disable it if it can’t. In addition to onboard media encryption for internal storage, the phone can be configured to inhibit certain functions based on location or the network it is connected to in order to prevent data loss. It might also be used to disable the device’s camera in secure facilities.

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PGP Web of Trust: Core Concepts Behind Trusted Communication

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Security

If you've ever used Linux, you've most likely used OpenPGP without even realizing it. The open-source implementation of OpenPGP is called GnuPG (stands for "GNU Privacy Guard"), and nearly all distributions rely on GnuPG for package integrity verification. Next time you run "yum install" or "yum update", each package will be verified against its cryptographic signature before it is allowed to be installed on your system. This assures that the software has not been altered between the time it was cryptographically signed by distribution developers on the master server, and the time it was downloaded to your system.

However, far fewer people have actually used GnuPG for what it was originally designed for -- secure exchange of information in an untrusted medium (such as the internet), and even fewer have a good understanding of how the trust relationships are supposed to work.

In this mini series of articles, we'll take a look at what the web of trust is and how to use it to set up a secure and trusted communication.

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Java-based malware driving DDoS botnet infects Windows, Mac, Linux devices

Filed under
Software
Security

The cross-platform HEUR:Backdoor.Java.Agent.a, as reported in a blog post published Tuesday by Kaspersky Lab, takes hold of computers by exploiting CVE-2013-2465, a critical Java vulnerability that Oracle patched in June. The security bug is present on Java 7 u21 and earlier. Once the bot has infected a computer, it copies itself to the autostart directory of its respective platform to ensure it runs whenever the machine is turned on. Compromised computers then report to an Internet relay chat channel that acts as a command and control server.

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FileZilla, Other Open-Source Software From 'Right' Sources Is Safe

Filed under
OSS
Security

A basic tenant of open-source software security has long been the idea that since the code is open, anyone can look inside to see if there is something that shouldn't be there.

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IBM Shows That Collaborations With the NSA Are a Company’s Death Knell

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Security

At this stage, despite deceiving marketing, IBM needs GNU/Linux and Free software more than GNU/Linux and FOSS need IBM. Recently, the President of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) called IBM a patent troll. IBM can carry on openwashing its business with OpenStack [11,12], Hadoop [13] and so on (even OpenOffice.org), but until it stops serving the NSA, the software patents agenda and various other conflicting interests (causes that harm software freedom and GNU/Linux) we are better off nurturing “true” (as in completely) Free software companies.

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If Microsoft thinks old Tor clients are risky, why not Windows XP?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
Security

Earlier this week, Microsoft revealed that it had been going into users computers and removing outdated Tor clients. At first glance, this might seem like a crazed, misplaced attack on the Tor network, not unlike a campaign by a certain Irish politician, but the issue runs deeper than first thought.

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For Real Security, Use CentOS — Never RHEL — and Run Neither on Amazon’s Servers

Filed under
Linux
Security

Never run Red Hat’s “Enterprise Linux”, which cannot be trusted because of NSA involvement; Amazon, which pays Microsoft for RHEL and works with the CIA, should never be used for hosting

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Renowned cryptographer believes his 'Blackphone' can stop the NSA

Filed under
Security

Revelations about how insecure our communications are have been a daily fixture of the news cycle recently, and it's in this climate that a pair of companies are combining to launch a new smartphone focused on privacy. The Blackphone will run a "security-oriented" version of Android named PrivatOS, which the companies say will allow users to securely place and receive phone calls, text messages, video chat, transfer and store files, and "anonymize your activity" through a VPN.

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