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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • To mitigate major Edge printing bug, use a Xerox copier, baffled user advises

    Beyond being breathtakingly bizarre, the bug could potentially have serious consequences for architects, engineers, lawyers, and other professionals who rely on Edge to print drawings, blueprints, legal briefs, and similarly sensitive documents. Edge is the default application for viewing PDFs on Windows 10 computers. While the errors demonstrated above happened using the "Microsoft Print to PDF" option, multiple users report similar alterations when using regular printing settings. (And besides, the print-to-PDF option is the default printing method for the Microsoft browser.) The alterations depend on several variables, including the printer selected, the settings used, and computer being used. It's not clear how long this flaw has been active or whether it has already affected legal cases or other sensitive proceedings that use documents printed from the Internet.

  • Keylogger Found in Audio Driver of HP Laptops
  • Criminals are Now Exploiting SS7 Flaws to Hack Smartphone Two-Factor Authentication Systems
  • A Vicious Microsoft Bug Left a Billion PCs Exposed [iophk: "people are gullible: Windows was never secure in the 22 years since it added TCP/IP; for those that remember, it was not secure even before that and was plagued with malware spread by disk and NAS (then called file servers)."
  • Microsoft finally bans SHA-1 certificates in Internet Explorer, Edge [Ed: Quit pretending that Microsoft cares about security in browsers that have a baked-in back door]

    The Tuesday updates for Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge force those browsers to flag SSL/TLS certificates signed with the aging SHA-1 hashing function as insecure. The move follows similar actions by Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox earlier this year.

    Browser vendors and certificate authorities have been engaged in a coordinated effort to phase out the use of SHA-1 certificates on the web for the past few years, because the hashing function no longer provides sufficient security against spoofing.

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • How to protect your Google and Facebook accounts with a security key

    Google supports a format called FIDO Universal 2nd Factor (U2F), which it helped develop. Keys are available that work over USB, Bluetooth, and NFC, so they can be used with a smartphone or tablet in addition to a PC.

  • Cisco Patches WikiLeaks Security Vulnerability Affecting Hundreds Of Devices

    Cisco has patched a critical flaw in its IOS software that affected more than 300 models of routers and switches that was discovered after WikiLeaks exposed CIA documents.

    "We've spoken to a few customers about it, a few enterprise clients, and thankfully it didn't any disrupt business for us," said one top executive from a solution provider and Cisco Gold partner who did not wished to be named. "I'm glad to know they fixed the issue. … Their devices will always be a big target for attackers because Cisco is everywhere."

  • Microsoft makes emergency security fix

    Microsoft has released an urgent update to stop hackers taking control of computers with a single email.

    The unusual bug, in Microsoft anti-malware software such as Windows Defender, could be exploited without the recipient even opening the message.

    Researchers working for Google's Project Zero cyber-security outfit discovered the flaw at the weekend.

    The fix has been specially pushed out hours before the software giant's monthly Tuesday security update.

  • Google’s OSS-Fuzz Finds 1,000 Open Source Bugs

    The numbers are in, and judging by them, OSS-Fuzz, the program Google unveiled last December to continuously fuzz open source software, has been a success.

    In five months the effort has unearthed more than 1,000 bugs, a quarter of them potential security vulnerabilities, Google says.

  • Open source vulnerabilities hit VMware [Ed: Ridiculous! WMware is secret software with back doors (RSA/EMC), so why focus only on holes in a FOSS component?]

    Apache Struts 2 is an open source web application framework for developing Java applications that has been in use since 2007. The recent Apache Struts 2 vulnerability affected vCenter Server 6.0 and 6.5, vRealize Operations Manager 6.x, vRealize Hyperic Server 5.x, and versions 6.x and 7.x of the Horizon Desktop-as-a-Service Platform.

  • Samsung partners with McAfee, brings security software to the Galaxy S8, Smart TVs, and PCs [Ed: But Samsung should know adding proprietary software to Tizen and/or Android won't necessarily make these more secure]

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Cisco kills leaked CIA 0-day that let attackers commandeer 318 switch models

    As previously reported, the zero-day exploit allowed attackers to issue commands that remotely execute malicious code on 318 models of Cisco switches. The attack code was published in early March by WikiLeaks as part of its Vault7 series of leaks, which the site is billing as the largest publication of intelligence documents ever.

    The bug resides in the Cisco Cluster Management Protocol (CMP), which uses the telnet protocol to deliver signals and commands on internal networks. It stems from a failure to restrict telnet options to local communications and the incorrect processing of malformed CMP-only telnet options.

  • Open source password strength meter could help boost account security

    It's no secret that most people are rubbish at choosing passwords -- it's something that's proved time and time again when the annual list of common passwords is released. To help overcome the problem, and hopefully increase the security of people's accounts, a team of researchers from the Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Chicago have created an open source password meter that provides advice about how to strengthen a password.

  • Apache OpenOffice: Not dead yet, you'll just have to wait until mid-May for mystery security fixes
  • NIST to security admins: You've made passwords too hard

    Despite the fact that cybercriminals stole more than 3 billion user credentials in 2016, users don't seem to be getting savvier about their password usage. The good news is that how we think about password security is changing as other authentication methods become more popular.

  • Google Docs Phishing Scam a Game Changer

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • 4 Best Practices for Web Browser Security on Your Linux Workstation

    There is no question that the web browser will be the piece of software with the largest and the most exposed attack surface on your Linux workstation. It is a tool written specifically to download and execute untrusted, frequently hostile code.

    It attempts to shield you from this danger by employing multiple mechanisms such as sandboxes and code sanitization, but they have all been previously defeated on multiple occasions. System administrators should learn to approach browsing websites as the most insecure activity you’ll engage in on any given day.

  • 'Crazy bad' bug in Microsoft's Windows malware scanner can be used to install malware

    Miscreants can turn the tables on Microsoft and use its own antivirus engine against Windows users – by abusing it to install malware on vulnerable machines.

    A particularly nasty security flaw exists in Redmond's anti-malware software, which is packaged and marketed in various forms: Windows Defender, Windows Intune Endpoint Protection, Microsoft Security Essentials, Microsoft System Center Endpoint Protection, Microsoft Forefront Security for SharePoint, Microsoft Endpoint Protection, and Microsoft Forefront Endpoint Protection. All are, at this moment, at risk. It is switched on by default in Windows 8, 8.1, 10, and Windows Server 2012.

    It is possible for hackers to craft files that are booby-trapped with malicious code, and this nasty payload is executed inadvertently and automatically by the scanner while inspecting the data. The injected code runs with administrative privileges, allowing it to gain full control of the system, install spyware, steal files, and so on.

    In other words, while Microsoft's scanner is searching a downloaded file for malware, it can be tricked into running and installing the very sort of software nasty it's supposed to catch and kill.

  • [Microsoft Employee:] Why your security appliance will be hacked

    I’m no world-class hacker/penetration tester, but I’ve been able to break into any organization I’ve been (legally) hired to do so in an hour or less, except for one place that took me three hours. That was on my second engagement with the customer after it had implemented many of the protections I had recommended during my first visit.

  • How the Macron campaign slowed cyberattackers

4 Best Practices for Web Browser Security on Your Linux Workstation

Filed under
Linux
Security
Web

There is no question that the web browser will be the piece of software with the largest and the most exposed attack surface on your Linux workstation. It is a tool written specifically to download and execute untrusted, frequently hostile code.

It attempts to shield you from this danger by employing multiple mechanisms such as sandboxes and code sanitization, but they have all been previously defeated on multiple occasions. System administrators should learn to approach browsing websites as the most insecure activity you’ll engage in on any given day.

Read more

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • [Old] Intel ME: The Way of Static Analysis
  • CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Users Get New Kernel That Patches CVE-2017-7895

    CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi announced today the availability of new stable kernels for the CloudLinux 7, CloudLinux 6, and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid operating systems.

    The updated kernel is available for download right now from the production repository of the CloudLinux 7, CloudLinux 6 Hybrid, and CloudLinux 6 operating systems, versioned 3.10.0-427.36.1.lve1.4.47. It replaces kernel 3.10.0-427.36.1.lve1.4.44 on CloudLinux 7 and Hybrid, as well as kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25 on CloudLinux 6.

  • Mac users installing popular DVD ripper get nasty backdoor instead

    Hackers compromised a download server for a popular DVD-ripping software named HandBrake and used it to push stealthy malware that stole victims' password keychains, password vaults, and possibly the master credentials that decrypted them, security researchers said Monday.

  • Google's Fuzz bot exposes over 1,000 open-source bugs

    Google's OSS-Fuzz bug-hunting robot has been hard at work, and in recent months, over 1,000 bugs have been exposed.

    According to Chrome Security engineers Oliver Chang and Abhishek Arya, software engineer Kostya Serebryany and Google Security program manager Josh Armour, the OSS-Fuzz bot has been scouring the web over the past five months in the pursuit of security vulnerabilities which can be exploited.

More Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Types of DDoS Attacks

    Distributed Denial of Service attacks (DDoS) are a favorite attack method of hackers and hacktivists, in large part due to their simplicity. We list the different types of DDoS attacks and offer resources to stop DDoS attacks.

  • Using Emoji for fingerprint verification

    The messaging app Telegram recently introduced end-to-end encrypted voice calls. As most of you probably know, encryption without verification is pretty useless since there is the risk of man-in-the-middle attacks. I don’t want to get too much into details about this. The point I want to make is, that you should verify your partners fingerprint (hash of the used key) in order to be secure.

    The interesting part of Telegrams new feature is the way they verify fingerprints. Traditionally you are presented with a String of (typically hexadecimal – 0-9,A-F) characters. In the case of Conversations the fingerprint are 64 hexadecimal characters. Telegram on the other hand introduced the way of displaying 4 out of a set of 333 emojis (1). Note that this is only used to verify that the current voice call is secure. The next call would have a different fingerprint, so keep in mind, that we are talking about two different use cases here.

    Still, how do those two methods compare? Could we use emoji in conversations to verify the fingerprint of identity keys?

  • HandBrake For Mac Mirror Server Was Compromised And Infected With PROTON Malware

    HandBrake is an open-source and free transcoder for digital video files. It makes ripping a film from a DVD to a data storage device such as NAS boxes easier. HandBrake works Linux, macOS, and Windows. A Recent version of Handbrake for Mac and possibly other downloads at the same site infected with malware. If you have downloaded HandBrake on Mac between 2/May/2017 and 06/May/2017, you need to delete the file ASAP. HandBrake infected with a new variant of OSX.PROTON malware.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • The Intel remote vulnerability is much, much worse than you thought

    Let’s take that again: a blank password to an always-open port sidesteps every single bit of authentication and security that is otherwise present.

  • The hijacking flaw that lurked in Intel chips is worse than anyone thought

    A remote hijacking flaw that lurked in Intel chips for seven years was more severe than many people imagined, because it allowed hackers to remotely gain administrative control over huge fleets of computers without entering a password. This is according to technical analyses published Friday.

  • The enduring myth of the hacker boy-band

    If it had seemed to infosec that the magazine might've had to go out of its way to find such an un-diverse group of hackers ... turns out, it did. Thompson's social media post revealed that during the course of reporting the story, there was "a meeting with the woman who runs the college's official hacking group."

  • SS7 flaw exploited by hackers to drain customers' bank accounts

    The weakness within the protocol has been known about since 2014, and in January, criminals exploited it to bypass the two-factor authentication method that banks use to protect unauthorised withdrawals from online accounts, German newspaper Suddeutsche Zeitung has reported.

  • Google phishing attack was foretold by researchers—and it may have used their code

    The "Google Docs" phishing attack that wormed its way through thousands of e-mail inboxes earlier this week exploited a threat that had been flagged earlier by at least three security researchers—one raised issues about the threat as early as October of 2011. In fact, the person or persons behind the attack may have copied the technique from a proof of concept posted by one security researcher to GitHub in February.

  • WPSeku – A Vulnerability Scanner to Find Security Issues in WordPress

    WordPress is a free and open-source, highly customizable content management system (CMS) that is being used by millions around the world to run blogs and fully functional websites. Because it is the most used CMS out there, there are so many potential WordPress security issues/vulnerabilities to be concerned about.

GNU/Linux Security: A look at QubesOS

Filed under
OS
Reviews
Security

Using GNU/Linux is by default more secure than using Microsoft Windows, this is common knowledge; however just because you use GNU/Linux, does not mean that your system is secure, and that is why some distributions have been created in order to maximize security; such as QubesOS.

QubesOS is very different from your typical run of the mill distro, such as Ubuntu or even the more hardcore like Arch Linux and Gentoo. QubesOS runs multiple virtual machines linked together under a single user-interface, to form a container based / compartmentalized operating system.

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Tizen News: Phones and TVs

  • Tizen 3.0-powered Samsung Z4 now available with offline retailers in india
    The Samsung Z4, the fourth smartphone in Samsung’s Z series and a successor to the Z2 (and not the Z3, as many would assume), has been formally announced and made an appearance at the Tizen Developer Conference (TDC 2017) this past week. The Z4 was rumoured to make its way to India on May 19th (Friday) and it did – arriving with offline retailers after launching in the country last Monday (one week ago).
  • Samsung 2017 QLED TVs World First to support autocalibration for HDR
  • Samsung approves You.i TV video platform for Tizen TV app development
    While Samsung has developed Tizen TV apps using JavaScript, You.i TV’s Engine Video app runs on Native Client (NACL), a web technology that does not only allows C++ applications to run in a standard browser but is said to be 24 times faster than JavaScript. Now that Samsung has approved You.i TV’s video engine platform, developers can craft more video content for Tizen Smart TV owners.
  • Samsung Smart TV gets a new Glympse app that enables location sharing on the TV
    Samsung Smart TV, powered by the intuitive, self-developed Tizen operating system, has gotten a cool new app which enables consumers to view the location of their friends, loved ones or even a pizza delivery or cable technician in real-time directly from their home’s largest screen. The new app is developed by Glympse, the leading real-time location services platform.

How To Encrypt DNS Traffic In Linux Using DNSCrypt

​Dnscrypt is a protocol that is used to improve DNS security by authenticating communications between a DNS client and a DNS resolver. DNSCrypt prevents DNS spoofing. It uses cryptographic signatures to verify that responses originate from the chosen DNS resolver and haven’t been tampered with. DNSCrypt is available for multi-platforms including Windows, MacOS, Unix, Android, iOS, Linux and even routers. Read
more

Debian-Based Untangle 13.0 Linux Firewall Tackles Bufferbloat, Adds New Features

Untangle NG Firewall, the open-source and powerful Debian-based network security platform featuring pluggable modules for network apps, has been updated to version 13.0, a major release adding new features and numerous improvements. The biggest improvement brought by the Untangle NG Firewall 13.0 release is to the poor latency generated by excess buffering in networking equipment, called bufferbloat, by supporting a queueing algorithm designed to optimize QoS and bandwidth to enforce a controlled delay. Read more

Kernel Space: HMM, Cloud Native, Linux 4.12, TFS, Linux 4.11.2, and 4.10 EoL

  • Faster machine learning is coming to the Linux kernel
    Heterogenous memory management (HMM) allows a device’s driver to mirror the address space for a process under its own memory management. As Red Hat developer Jérôme Glisse explains, this makes it easier for hardware devices like GPUs to directly access the memory of a process without the extra overhead of copying anything. It also doesn't violate the memory protection features afforded by modern OSes.
  • Product Development in the Age of Cloud Native
    Ever since the mass adoption of Agile development techniques and devops philosophies that attempt to eradication organizational silos, there’s been a welcome discussion on how to optimize development for continuous delivery on a massive scale. Some of the better known adages that have taken root as a result of this shift include “deploy in production after checking in code” (feasible due to the rigorous upfront testing required in this model), “infrastructure as code”, and a host of others that, taken out of context, would lead one down the path of chaos and mayhem. Indeed, the shift towards devops and agile methodologies and away from “waterfall” has led to a much needed evaluation of all processes around product and service delivery that were taken as a given in the very recent past.
  • Running Intel Kabylake Graphics On Linux 4.12
  • TFS File-System Still Aiming To Compete With ZFS, Written In Rust
    The developers behind the Rust-based Redox operating system continue working on the "TFS" file-system that they hope will compete with the long-standing ZFS file-system, but TFS isn't being tied to just Redox OS.
  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Reached End of Life, Users Urged to Move to Linux 4.11 Series
    Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the Linux community about the release and immediate availability of the seventeenth maintenance update to the Linux 4.10 kernel series, which also marked the end of life.
  • Linux Kernel 4.11.2 Has Many F2FS and CIFS Improvements, Lots of Updated Drivers