Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Security

Docker security with SELinux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Security

This article is based on a talk I gave at DockerCon this year. It will discuss Docker container security, where we are currently, and where we are headed.

Read more

Tor, trust and the NSA

Filed under
OSS
Security

Tor is an anonymizing network that’s designed to protect you by “bouncing your communications around a distributed network of relays run by volunteers all around the world: it prevents somebody watching your Internet connection from learning what sites you visit, and it prevents the sites you visit from learning your physical location.”

That’s cool, but does Tor really guarantee you what you think or assume it does? I can’t say for sure, but when facing a state-sponsored entity with time and resources on its side, you cannot be too careful. At least if pays to know what other people think about Tor, especially when what they have to say runs counter to what you know, or what you think you know.

Read more

Avoid the Android vampire apps

Filed under
Android
Security

Some Android applications will drain your smartphone or tablet of battery life, storage or bandwidth like a blood-sucking fiend. Here's what's what with the worst of the worst.

Read more

Snowden on Dropbox: It’s hostile to privacy

Filed under
Software
Security

Dropbox is a very popular Cloud storage services, but is it good for the privacy-conscious?

According to Edward Snowden, it’s not.

In an interviewed published on GuardianNews, Snowden described Dropbox as “hostile to privacy.”

So what are the better alternatives. Snowden recommended Cloud storage services with zero-knowledge as a key feature.

Read more

How to use public PCs safely with Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
HowTos

Public PCs aren't safe, so what's a PC user to do? Carry a Linux distribution on a USB stick in their backpocket of course!

Read more

Announcing Project Zero

Filed under
Google
OSS
Security

Security is a top priority for Google. We've invested a lot in making our products secure, including strong SSL encryption by default for Search, Gmail and Drive, as well as encrypting data moving between our data centers. Beyond securing our own products, interested Googlers also spend some of their time on research that makes the Internet safer, leading to the discovery of bugs like Heartbleed.

The success of that part-time research has led us to create a new, well-staffed team called Project Zero.

Read more

LibreSSL Portable Encounters Its First Release

Filed under
OSS
Security

OpenBSD developers have announced their first release of LibreSSL portable.

LibreSSL 2.0.0 is the release and is tested to build on Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X, and FreeBSD systems. Bob Beck of OpenBSD explains, "This is intended as an initial release to allow the community to start using and providing feedback. We will be adding support for other platforms as time and resources permit."

Read more

Samsung Nixes Knox: The Android Security Saga Continues

Filed under
Android
Security

Granted, Google has been updating handset issues at a quicker pace – particularly when it comes to security patches, via Play Services –and so far, the telcos have not played spoilers. But remember: Google has not initiated a move to push an entirely new OS directly to users except to those who own Google’s telco independent Nexus brand devices. Keep in mind that there’s a big difference between updating a feature or security patch and producing an entirely new OS. OS updates typically up the Kernel and the radios. It will be interesting (and historical) if the telcos continue to stay out of the way.

Read more

[Fedora] Simple Patch Policy

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Following the approval of the Simple Patch policy, all the necessary pieces are now in place.

Read more

How Card.com Is Securing Itself and Its Users With Open Source

Filed under
OSS
Drupal
Security

"We're heavily involved in Drupal. I'm a member of the Drupal security team and the former lead of the team for over two years," Knaddison said. "So it's an area where we have a fair amount of expertise and depth, and we feel that our situation is best served by fixing vulnerabilities directly in the software itself."

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Intel Sandy Bridge Gets A Surprise Boost From Linux 3.17

Besides the recent work to support OpenGL Geometry Shaders for Sandy Bridge in Mesa, users of Intel "Sandy Bridge" HD Graphics can also be thankful for the forthcoming Linux 3.17 kernel. Early testing of Linux 3.17 has revealed that for at least some Intel Sandy Bridge hardware are OpenGL performance improvements with the newer kernel code. Read more

Open Source Okavango14: The Heartbeat of the Delta

We can hear this heartbeat by listening to what the environment tells us through sensors and testing. I proposed that we build low cost sensors using open source hardware and software. In recent years there has been quite a disruption in computing ability as a result of the prevalence of smartphones. Increasingly small and powerful components and processors have created an opportunities that we would have never thought possible. One of the results of that is the single-board Raspberry Pi computer. Originally, the Raspberry Pi was created to enable students to learn hardware and software development. For the Okavango Wilderness Project, we are using them to take environmental readings and send those to us for inclusion into the Into The Okavango website. Jer will cover this more in his expedition post. We are using them to measure water temperature, pH, conductivity, total dissolved solids, salinity, and specific gravity. Read more

Kochi innovator Arvind Sanjeev makes Google Glass clone for Rs 4,500

Instead of commercializing the product and with the intention of contributing to the community, Sanjeev posted a blog explaining how his 'Smart Cap' can be built by anyone using opensource hardware such as a Rasberry Pi computer, an Arduino board and Android software. Read more

Alfresco Raises A Fresh $45M To Fuel Open-Source Enterprise Content Management

Alfresco, an open source, enterprise content management startup, is today announcing a new round of funding of $45 million — a Series D round that is more than twice as big as all of its previous rounds put together. The UK-based company competes against legacy services like Documentum (which was co-founded by one of Alfresco’s co-founders, John Newton) and Sharepoint to help large organisations manage their disparate document storage both in the cloud and on-premises, and also offer versioning control and other compliance requirements across mobile, PC and other devices. Alfresco will use the new funding to step its business up a gear, with new sales and marketing efforts, and moves into more cloud-based services that could see it competing more directly also against the likes of Dropbox, Box and Huddle. Read more