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Security

Mac, Linux, BSD open for attack: Kaspersky

Filed under
Security

computerworld.com.au: Looming attacks will soon pop the security bubble enjoyed by Linux and Macintosh users, according to Russian security expert Eugene Kaspersky.

Firefox add-on blocks 'clickjacking' attacks

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security

computerworld.com: A popular Firefox add-on designed to block scripts and plug-ins has been updated to stymie the new "clickjacking" class of attacks, the extension's developer said today.

Vendors rush to fix critical TCP/IP bug

Filed under
Security

techworld.com (IDG): Internet infrastructure vendors are rushing to develop patches for a set of TCP/IP security flaws, which could help hackers knock servers offline with very little effort. Robert Lee and Jack Louis, have said that they can knock Windows, Linux, embedded systems and even firewalls offline.

How To Stop Firefox Clickjacking Exploit Attack

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Security

cyberciti.biz: Really scary exploit attack in wild, which affects all browsers under any desktop operating systems including MS IE, Linux, Apple safari, Opera, Firefox and Adobe flash. Any website that uses CSS, flash and IFRAME can be used to attack on end users. Attacker is able to take control of the links that your browser visits.

Hackers attack Large Hadron Collider

Filed under
Security

telegraph.co.uk: Hackers have mounted an attack on the Large Hadron Collider, raising concerns about the security of the biggest experiment in the world as it passes an important new milestone.

Red Hat's security issue

Filed under
Linux
Security

blog.perens.com: Last month, Red Hat issued a security bulletin. Not all that went on is clear, but it seems that the servers used to develop and distribute Fedora and Red Hat were accessed by a person with criminal intent. But there are continuing problems with Red Hat's handling of the situation.

Also: Fedora and our security attitude

Putting A 'Korset' On The Spread Of Computer Viruses

Filed under
Software
Security

sciencedaily.com: Anti-virus companies play a losing game. But Prof. Avishai Wool recently unveiled a unique new program called the “Korset” to stop malware on Linux, the operating system used by the majority of web and email servers worldwide.

New security hole in VLC video player

Filed under
Security

heise-online.co.uk: A new critical security hole has been found in the VLC player from the VideoLan project, while there is still no public fix for the previous security hole found two weeks ago.

Linux under attack: Compromised SSH keys lead to rootkit

Filed under
Linux
Security

blogs.zdnet: The U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (CERT) has issued a warning for what it calls “active attacks” against Linux-based computing infrastructures using compromised SSH keys.

Red Hat fesses up to Fedora FOSS security fiasco

Filed under
Linux
Security

itwire.com: A week or so ago, end users of the Linux-based Red Hat Fedora OS were warned to avoid downloading packages due to an "issue in the infrastructure systems" which waved big red flags suggesting a security breach to many industry observers.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux tutorial website

Hi guys, here you have a website that covers Linux basics: http://linux-bible.com. Most of the examples are from Ubuntu.

Today in Techrights

Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information. Read more

Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more