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Security

Responses To The Linux Desktop Security Problem

Filed under
Linux
Security

phoronix.com: Just about 24 hours ago I spread the news about a major vulnerability in X.Org / XKB that makes it trivial for anyone with physical access to a Linux-based desktop system to easily bypass any screensaver lock whether you're using GNOME, KDE, or most other desktop environments. So what's changed in the past day?

Many Eyes, Many Heads

Filed under
OSS
Security

mrpogson.com: One of the advantages of FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software) is that it’s not created and distributed in the vacuum of a heavily EULAed/binary/closed environment and anyone can examine the code.

Zero-day suspected in BIND 9 DNS server crashes

Filed under
Security

itpro.co.uk: BIND 9 DNS servers across the web have crashed, with a zero-day vulnerability believed to be the cause.

Kernel Log: more details on the kernel.org hack

Filed under
Linux
Security
Web

h-online.com: The recent Kernel Summit, LinuxCon Europe and Realtime Workshop events revealed lots of interesting developments from the kernel scene, including a few details of the hack at kernel.org.

Linux Malware: Are We There Yet?

Filed under
Linux
Security

datamation.com: For years, one of the biggest benefits of escaping Microsoft Windows was that running a security suite with a Linux distribution was completely unnecessary. There simply wasn't a need for it.

WineHQ database compromise

Filed under
Software
Security
Web

winehq.org: I am sad to say that there was a compromise of the WineHQ database system.

89 trees missing from linux-next

Filed under
Linux
Security

lwn.net: Of the 171 trees that represent work for the next merge window, 89 only exist on kernel.org machines. This means (obviously) that I have not had updates to those 89 trees since the kernel.org servers were taken down.

MySQL.com Hacked to Serve Malware

Filed under
Software
Security
Web

pcworld.com: The website for the open-source MySQL database was hacked and used to serve malware to visitors Monday.

Also: MySQL at the core of commercial open source

Dodging Bullets With Debian GNU/Linux

Filed under
Linux
Security

mrpogson.com: A recent bug reported in Ubuntu GNU/Linux is that apt-key fails to properly check the package-signing keys downloaded from an Ubuntu repository. Debian has the same faulty code but thankfully it is disabled.

Is Linux Still Safe?

Filed under
Linux
Security
  • Is Linux Still The Safest Operating System?
  • Some Linux Foundation crack attack details emerge
  • Open Ballot: Is Linux really so secure?
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