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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security

IPFire 2.19 Now Supports On-Demand IPsec VPNs, Core Update 110 Is Now Available

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GNU
Linux
Security

IPFire's Michael Tremer announced today, April 28, 2017, the release of IPFire 2.19 Core Update 110, a new stable maintenance version of the open-source, Linux-based firewall operating system.

Coming two and a half months after the previous point release, IPFire 2.19 Core Update 110 is here to implement support for on-demand IPsec (Internet Protocol Security) VPNs (Virtual Private Networks), which might just come in handy to those who deal with a huge amount of IPsec net-to-net connections on their infrastructures.

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Linux Mint-using terror nerd awaits sentence for training Islamic State

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Linux
Security

A paranoid Welsh Muslim who wore gloves while typing on his laptop, admitted being part of Islamic State, and, gasp, harbored a copy of Linux Mint, has been described as a “new and dangerous breed of terrorist.”

Samata Ullah, 34, who also used voice modulation software to disguise his thick Welsh accent while making instructional videos about encryption, pleaded guilty to five terrorism charges at Cardiff Crown Court. He was due to be sentenced Friday afternoon.

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Security Leftovers

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Security

Tor 0.3.0.6 is released: a new series is stable!

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Security

Tor 0.3.0.6 is the first stable release of the Tor 0.3.0 series.

With the 0.3.0 series, clients and relays now use Ed25519 keys to authenticate their link connections to relays, rather than the old RSA1024 keys that they used before. (Circuit crypto has been Curve25519-authenticated since 0.2.4.8-alpha.) We have also replaced the guard selection and replacement algorithm to behave more robustly in the presence of unreliable networks, and to resist guard- capture attacks.

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Easy ways to make your Android device more secure

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Android
Security

How secure is your data on that Android smartphone? On a scale of "Alcatraz" to "open field of flowers," where does yours rank? If you're truly concerned about the security of your mobile device (which you should be), you know there are always steps to take to further clamp it down. Because some of these steps a bit more complicated, they are often overlooked by the average user. That's why I want to offer up a few easy ways anyone can bring a bit more security to their Android device.

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Security Leftovers

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Security

Microsoft Begs, Bugs, and Bug Doors

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
  • Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft

    Microsoft has urged non-tech-savvy people – or anyone who just wants a stable computer – to not download and install this year's biggest revision to Windows by hand. And that's because it may well bork your machine.

    It's been two weeks since Microsoft made its Creators Update available, and we were previously warned it will be a trickle-out rather than a massive rollout. Now, Redmond has urged users to stop manually fetching and installing the code, and instead wait for it to be automatically offered to your computer when it's ready.

  • Microsoft Word flaw took so long to fix that hackers used it to send fraud software to millions of computers

    A flaw in Microsoft Word took the tech giant so long to fix that hackers were able to use it to send fraud software to millions of computers, it has been revealed.

    The security flaw, officially known as CVE-2017-0199, could allow a hacker to seize control of a personal computer with little trace, and was fixed on April 11 in Microsoft's regular monthly security update - nine months after it was discovered.

Security Leftovers

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Security

Security updates and no more patches from grsecurity (without a fee)

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Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • GrSecurity Kernel Patches Will No Longer Be Free To The Public

    The GrSecurity initiative that hosts various out-of-tree patches to the mainline Linux kernel in order to enhance the security will no longer be available to non-paying users.

    GrSecurity has been around for the better part of two decades and going back to the 2.4 kernel days. In 2015 the stable GrSecurity patches became available to only commercial customers while the testing patches had still been public. That's now changing with all GrSecurity users needing to be customers.

  • Passing the Baton: FAQ

    This change is effective today, April 26th 2017. Public test patches have been removed from the download area. 4.9 was specifically chosen as the last public release as being the latest upstream LTS kernel will help ease the community transition.

  • grsecurity - Passing the Baton

    Anyone here use grsecurity and have any thoughts about this?

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More in Tux Machines

5 fundamental differences between Windows 10 and Linux

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Firefly COM dual boots Android and Ubuntu on hexa-core RK3399

GNOME developer Bastien Nocera talks in his latest blog post about the enhancements he managed to implement in the past few weeks to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system. Read more

Games: Morphite, Mooseman, Arma, and PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller

  • Stylish FPS 'Morphite' released without Linux support, but it's coming
    Sadly, Morphite [Steam] has seen a delay with the Linux version. Thankfully, the developer was quick to respond and it's still coming.
  • The Mooseman, a short side-scrolling adventure just released for Linux
    In the mood for something a little out there? Well, The Mooseman [Steam] a short side-scroller might just hit the spot.
  • Arma 3 1.76 for Linux is planned, work on it to start "soon"
    Bohemia Interactive have announced in their latest "SITREP" that the Linux version of Arma 3 will be updated to the latest version of 1.76, work is set to start on it "soon".
  • Sony's PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller Now Supported in Fedora Linux, GNOME
    GNOME developer Bastien Nocera talks in his latest blog post about the enhancements he managed to implement in the past few weeks to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system. The patches submitted by the developer to the Bluetooth packages in the latest Fedora Linux release promise to bring improvements to the way PlayStation 3 DualShock controllers are set up in the environment if you're using the GNOME desktop environment. Until now, to set up a DualShock 3 controller, users had to plug it in via USB, then disconnect it, and then press the "P" button on the joypad, which would have popped-up a dialog to confirm the Bluetooth connection. But this method had some quirks though.

Debian Development Reports

  • Free software log (July and August 2017)
    August was DebConf, which included a ton of Policy work thanks to Sean Whitton's energy and encouragement. During DebConf, we incorporated work from Hideki Yamane to convert Policy to reStructuredText, which has already made it far easier to maintain. (Thanks also to David Bremner for a lot of proofreading of the result.) We also did a massive bug triage and closed a ton of older bugs on which there had been no forward progress for many years. After DebConf, as expected, we flushed out various bugs in the reStructuredText conversion and build infrastructure. I fixed a variety of build and packaging issues and started doing some more formatting cleanup, including moving some footnotes to make the resulting document more readable.
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2017
    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #125
    16 package reviews have been added, 99 have been updated and 92 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.