Security

ID theft, vulnerabilities, privacy issues, etc

Symantec finds Linux wiper malware

Filed under
Linux
Security

itworld.com: Security vendors analyzing the code used in the cyberattacks against South Korea are finding nasty components designed to wreck infected computers. Tucked inside a piece of Windows malware used in the attacks is a component that erases Linux machines.

Taking Stock of Linux Security and Antivirus Needs

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Linux
Security

thevarguy.com: Open source fans like to brag that Linux needs no antivirus software. Yet as executives at security vendor ESET were keen to remind me in a recent interview, that truism holds true only to a certain extent.

25 Years of vulnerabilities - Linux has the most

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Linux
Security

itwire.com: Researchers at Sourcefire have analysed 25 years of vulnerabilities that were reported to CVE and NVD databases and found some interesting results.

Putting enterprise security in place with open source tools

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Security

What's the best way to secure an enterprise network, including both communications and data? No single solution fits all situations, but the practices outlined here mark a solid starting point on which IT departments can build.

Desktop Linux needs anti-virus like a fish needs a bicycle

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Linux
Security

dontsurfinthenude.blogspot: You don't need an anti-virus program on Linux: I've said it before, but Don't Surf in the Nude started because of an interest in internet security, so I can't resist trying out anti-virus programs in Linux.

Linux users targeted by mystery drive-by rootkit

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Linux
Security

techworld.com: Security researchers have discovered what appears to be an experimental Linux rootkit designed to infect its highly select victims during a classic drive-by website attack.

Why Linux Will Never Suffer From Viruses Like Windows

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Linux
Security

hothardware.com: There seems to be a recurring phenomenon in the technology press, where any trojan that affects Linux or Macs becomes front page news. On the other hand, trojans that affect Windows are mostly ignored.

'FIRST ever' Linux, Mac OS X-only password sniffing Trojan spotted

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Security

theregister.co.uk: Security researchers have discovered a potential dangerous Linux and Mac OS X cross-platform trojan.

Emergency Patches Pushed for Flash, PHP

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Software
Security

pcworld.com: The Adobe fix aims to cure an "object confusion vulnerability" discovered in all versions of the player -- Windows, Macintosh, Linux, and Android -- but thus far has only been used to attack Windows systems using Microsoft's browser software.

Student stiffs penetration tool BackTrack Linux with 0-day

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Linux
Security

theregister.co.uk: A student has discovered a critical vulnerability in BackTrack, a flavour of Linux that's a favourite among security pros.

'Flashback' Mac Malware: One More Reason to Switch to Linux

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Mac
Security

pcworld.com: Given the vast numbers of Macs that are apparently infected with the Flashback Trojan malware, it's not at all surprising to see that sales of Mac security software are now skyrocketing.

Decade-old flaw could affect Linux, Macs

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Security

zdnet.com.au: Patches have been released for file-networking protocol software, Samba, revealing that the software, which is used extensively in Macs and Linux, has been subject to a critical vulnerability for almost a decade.

The Privacy Pickle

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Security

linuxinsider.com: In the meantime, another compelling conversation has been raging for some time now, and Linux Girl would be remiss not to cover it, because it's an important topic. Privacy, that is -- and the costs that go along with it.

Responses To The Linux Desktop Security Problem

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Linux
Security

phoronix.com: Just about 24 hours ago I spread the news about a major vulnerability in X.Org / XKB that makes it trivial for anyone with physical access to a Linux-based desktop system to easily bypass any screensaver lock whether you're using GNOME, KDE, or most other desktop environments. So what's changed in the past day?

Many Eyes, Many Heads

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OSS
Security

mrpogson.com: One of the advantages of FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software) is that it’s not created and distributed in the vacuum of a heavily EULAed/binary/closed environment and anyone can examine the code.

Zero-day suspected in BIND 9 DNS server crashes

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Security

itpro.co.uk: BIND 9 DNS servers across the web have crashed, with a zero-day vulnerability believed to be the cause.

Kernel Log: more details on the kernel.org hack

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Linux
Security
Web

h-online.com: The recent Kernel Summit, LinuxCon Europe and Realtime Workshop events revealed lots of interesting developments from the kernel scene, including a few details of the hack at kernel.org.

Linux Malware: Are We There Yet?

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Linux
Security

datamation.com: For years, one of the biggest benefits of escaping Microsoft Windows was that running a security suite with a Linux distribution was completely unnecessary. There simply wasn't a need for it.

WineHQ database compromise

Filed under
Software
Security
Web

winehq.org: I am sad to say that there was a compromise of the WineHQ database system.

89 trees missing from linux-next

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Linux
Security

lwn.net: Of the 171 trees that represent work for the next merge window, 89 only exist on kernel.org machines. This means (obviously) that I have not had updates to those 89 trees since the kernel.org servers were taken down.

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