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Security

Security News

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Security

Security News

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Security

Wireshark 2.2

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Software
Security
  • Wireshark 2.2 Released

    Wireshark 2.2 features "Decode As" improvements, the various UIs now support exporting packets as JSON, there is new file format decoding support, and a wide range of new protocol support. New protocol coverage includes Apache Cassandra, USB3 Vision Protocol, USIP protocol, UserLog protocol, Zigbee Protocol Clusters, Cisco ttag, and much more.

  • Wireshark 2.2.0 Is Out as the World's Most Popular Network Vulnerability Scanner

    Today, September 7, 2016, the development team behind the world's most popular network protocol analyzer, Wireshark, proudly announced the release of a new major stable version, namely Wireshark 2.2.

    After being in development for the past couple of months, Wireshark 2.2.0 has finally hit the stable channel, bringing with it a huge number of improvements and updated protocols. For those of you who never heard of Wireshark, we want to remind them that it's an open-source network vulnerability scanner used by security researchers and network administrators for development, analysis, troubleshooting, as well as education purposes.

Security News

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Security
  • New release: usbguard-0.6.0

    Another milestone behind us. The 0.6.0 release brings the promissed CentOS/RHEL 7 compatibility. This means that our Copr EPEL-7 repository as well as Fedora’s EPEL-7 repository will now provide the latest versions of USBGuard. Check it out!

    One more very good piece of news is that USBGuard was accepted in Debian and is available in Sid (unstable). A big thanks goes to Muri Nicanor and others involved in this packaging effort!

  • StartSSL customers, it is time to leave. Now!

    While listening to the Security Now podcast, I have listened first with amusement then with horror to Steve reading email from Mozilla about the security problems with WoSign CA.

    Their list of woes is long, read the linked email for details, but one thing turned up during the email which I was not aware of: StartCom (owner of the StartSSL certificate authority) was apparently recently bought by WoSign CA! Apparently one of the security bugs StartSSL has (had?) was that with properly modified POST request (yes, I guess you can do it in the Developer Tools of your Firefox) you can get certificate linked to the root ceritificate “CA 沃通根证书” (or “WoSign CA Free SSL Certificate G2” with another value of the parameter). Awesome!

    What’s even more interesting is that I am a paying customer of StartSSL CA and I have never been made aware of the change of ownership. The only other mention of the possible change of ownership I found was on the Wikipedia page, which linked to the blogpost, which is now unavailable due to “legal review of the site” […]. Even better!

  • Debian GNU/Linux Fixes Dangerous TCP Flaw In New Update
  • Why Security Performance Will be Key in NFV

    There is growing evidence that the data center is driving toward a more software-centric security model that will be core to network functions virtualization (NFV) and software-defined networking (SDN) technology. This new model means that security performance in NFV will be key.

  • How to enable server-side encryption in Nextcloud

    Out of the box, Nextcloud servers do not run with server-side encryption. Follow these steps to enable an extra layer of security for Nextcloud.

  • Umbreon rootkit targets Linux on x86, ARM [Ed: nonsensical marketing hype from Trend Micro]
  • Pokemon Themed 'Umbreon' Rootkit Hides In Linux Systems
  • Taking umbrage at Umbreon, the Linux rootkit that likes to hide
  • Linux rootkit, named for Pokémon's Umbreon, targets Linux

Calamares 2.4 Universal Linux Installer Gets Its First Point Release to Fix Bugs

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GNU
Linux
Security

The Calamares team announced recently the availability of the first point release to the new stable series of the distribution-independent system installer used in many GNU/Linux distributions, Calamares 2.4.

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Security News

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Security
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • Stealthy, tricky to remove rootkit targets Linux systems on ARM and x86 [Ed: IDG covers this nonsense from Trend Micro (not a real risk, just the name Pokémon for better headlines])
  • You can't weigh risk if you don't know what you don't know

    If any of us have ever been in a planning meeting, a variant of this has no doubt come up at some point. It came up for me last week, and every time I hear it I think about all things we don't know we don't know. If you're not familiar with the concept, it works a bit like this. I know I don't know to drive a boat. But because I know I don't know this, I could learn. If you know you lack certain knowledge, you could find a way to learn it. If you don't know what you don't know, there is nothing you can do about it. The future is often an unknown unknown. There is nothing we can do about the future in many instances, you just have to wait until it becomes a known, and hope it won't be anything too horrible. There can also be blindness when you think you know something, but you really don't. This is when people tend to stop listening to the actual experts because they think they are an expert.

Security News

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Security
  • Pokémon-inspired rootkit attacks Linux systems [Ed: Media hyping up "Linux" threat which requires 1) the cracker has access to the device. 2) cracker installs malware.]

    Provides backdoor and traffic-hiding capabilities.

    A new persistent stealthy malware that can give attackers full control over Linux servers has been discovered by researchers.

    Researcher Fernando Mercês with security vendor Trend Micro said the malware - a rootkit family - is named after a character in the Pokémon fantasy game called Umbreon.

    Umbreon is a dark Pokémon that hides in the night, an "appropriate characteristic for a rootkit," Mercês wrote.

  • Pokémon-loving VXer targets Linux with 'Umbreon' rootkit [Ed: More hysteria, now in British media, over something that's not a real risk, thanks to self promotion]
  • ,

  • LuaBot Is the First Botnet Malware Coded in Lua Targeting Linux Platforms [Ed: so don’t install malware]

    Unlike Mirai, which is the fruit of a two-year-long coding frenzy, LuaBot is in its early stages of development, with the first detection being reported only a week ago and a zero detection rate on VirusTotal for current samples.

  • Nearly 800,000 Brazzers Porn Site Accounts Exposed in Forum Hack [Ed: Remember Canonical having Ubuntu Forums cracked, twice, due to proprietary vBulletin? Well, vBulletin -- again.]

    Nearly 800,000 accounts for popular porn site Brazzers have been exposed in a data breach. Although the data originated from the company's separate forum, Brazzers users who never signed up to the forum may also find their details included in the dump.

    Motherboard was provided the dataset by breach monitoring site Vigilante.pw for verification purposes. The data contains 790,724 unique email addresses, and also includes usernames and plaintext passwords. (The set has 928,072 entries in all, but many are duplicates.)

    Troy Hunt, a security researcher and creator of the website Have I Been Pwned? helped verify the dataset by contacting subscribers to his site, who confirmed a number of their details from the data.

Debian plugs Linux 'TCP snoop' bug

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Security
Debian

Debian's maintainers have moved to plug the TCP snooping flaw that emerged in August 2016.

The bug, CVE-2016-5696, was spotted by University of California Riverside's Zhiyun Qian and his collaborators and published in August.

It enabled an attack against Linux (and Android) implementations of RFC 5961, which used challenge ACK packets to try and harden Linux. The implementation bug, present in the kernel since 2012, meant targets could be fooled into rate-limiting their challenge ACKs, letting an attacker work out sequence numbering when it resumed.

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Security News

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More in Tux Machines

Google may unveil merged Android and Chrome OS, dubbed Andromeda, at event

If you thought Google’s October 4 event — where the firm is rumored to launch two smartphones, Google Home, Daydream VR, Chromecast Ultra, and Wi-Fi Routers — wasn’t packed enough, think again. It has been a long time coming, but Google may finally offer a peak at Andromeda, an operating system that sees the merger of Android and Chrome OS. Andromeda is the code name for the long-rumored merger, and Android Police says it have been sitting on a rumor that Google may demo the OS in October. What made the company share it now? A tweet from Hiroshi Lockheimer, senior vice president of Android, Chrome OS, and Google Play at Google. Read more

KDE Leftovers

today's howtos

Lenovo G50 & CentOS 7.2 MATE - Fairly solid

Is there a perfect track record for any which distro? No. Do any two desktop environments ever behave the same? No. Is there anything really good and cool about the MATE offering? Yes, definitely. It's not the finest, but it's definitely quite all right. You do get very decent hardware support, adequate battery life and good performance, smartphone and media support is top notch, and your applications will all run happily. On the other hand, you will struggle with Samba and Bluetooth, and there are some odd issues here and there. I think the Gnome and Xfce offerings are better, but MATE is not to be dissed as a useless relic. Far from it, this is definitely an option you ought to consider if you're into less-than-mainstream desktops, and you happen to like CentOS. To sum it all up, another goodie in the growing arsenal of CentOS fun facts. Enjoy. Read more