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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Troyan Virus Turns Linux Servers into Bitcoin Miners

    A new and dangerous computer virus has been targeting Linux servers, its goal: to turn computer servers into Bitcoin miners. The attack is aimed at environments running the Redis NoSQL database, the virus is also able to probe the network interfaces of its hosts to propagate itself.

    Approximately more than 30,000 servers running the Redis database are in danger due to the lack of an access password. The virus is named “Linux.Lady” and it was discovered first by the Russian IT-security solutions vendor Dr. Web. The company released a report on the virus, classifying it into the Troyan subcategory.

  • A New Wireless Hack Can Unlock 100 Million Volkswagens

    In 2013, when University of Birmingham computer scientist Flavio Garcia and a team of researchers were preparing to reveal a vulnerability that allowed them to start the ignition of millions of Volkswagen cars and drive them off without a key, they were hit with a lawsuit that delayed the publication of their research for two years. But that experience doesn’t seem to have deterred Garcia and his colleagues from probing more of VW’s flaws: Now, a year after that hack was finally publicized, Garcia and a new team of researchers are back with another paper that shows how Volkswagen left not only its ignition vulnerable but the keyless entry system that unlocks the vehicle’s doors, too. And this time, they say, the flaw applies to practically every car Volkswagen has sold since 1995.

  • Almost every Volkswagen sold since 1995 can be unlocked with an Arduino

    The first affects almost every car Volkswagen has sold since 1995, with only the latest Golf-based models in the clear. Led by Flavio Garcia at the University of Birmingham in the UK, the group of hackers reverse-engineered an undisclosed Volkswagen component to extract a cryptographic key value that is common to many of the company's vehicles.

  • Road Warriors: Beware of ‘Video Jacking’

    A little-known feature of many modern smartphones is their ability to duplicate video on the device’s screen so that it also shows up on a much larger display — like a TV. However, new research shows that this feature may quietly expose users to a simple and cheap new form of digital eavesdropping.

    Dubbed “video jacking” by its masterminds, the attack uses custom electronics hidden inside what appears to be a USB charging station. As soon as you connect a vulnerable phone to the appropriate USB charging cord, the spy machine splits the phone’s video display and records a video of everything you tap, type or view on it as long as it’s plugged in — including PINs, passwords, account numbers, emails, texts, pictures and videos.

Security News

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Security
  • One bug to rule them all: 'State-supported' Project Sauron malware attacks world's top PCs

    Two top electronic security firms have discovered a new powerful malware suite being used to target just dozens of high-value targets around the world. The research shows that it was likely developed on the orders of a government engaging in cyber espionage.

    The California-based Symantec has labeled the group behind the attack Strider, while Moscow-based Kaspersky Labs dubbed it ProjectSauron. Both are references to J. R. R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings, a nod to the fact that the original malware code contained the word “Sauron.”

  • Disable WPAD now or have your accounts and private data compromised

    The Web Proxy Auto-Discovery Protocol (WPAD), enabled by default on Windows and supported by other operating systems, can expose computer users' online accounts, web searches, and other private data, security researchers warn.

    Man-in-the-middle attackers can abuse the WPAD protocol to hijack people's online accounts and steal their sensitive information even when they access websites over encrypted HTTPS or VPN connections, said Alex Chapman and Paul Stone, researchers with U.K.-based Context Information Security, during the DEF CON security conference this week.

  • With Anonymous' latest attacks in Rio, the digital games have begun

    A wave of denial of service (DDoS) attacks on state and city websites followed immediately after Anonymous delivered their statement. The group boasted taking down at least five sites, including www.brasil2016.gov.br, www.rio2016.com, www.esporte.gov.br, www.cob.org.br and www.rj.gov.br. They broadcast their exploits using the hashtags #OpOlympicHacking, #Leaked and #TangoDown, some of which were set up months ago.



  • Kaminsky Advocates for Greater Cloud Security

    There are a lot of different reasons why organizations choose to move to the cloud and many reasons why they do not. Speaking at a press conference during the Black Hat USA security event, security researcher Dan Kaminsky provided his views on what's wrong with the Internet today and where the cloud can fit in.

    "There's a saying we have," Kaminsky said. "There is no such thing as cloud, just other people's computers."

    While the cloud represents a utility model for computing, Kaminsky also suggests that there are ways to use the cloud to improve overall security. With the cloud, users and applications can be isolated or 'sandboxed' in a way that can limit risks.

    With proper configurations, including rate limiting approaches, the impact of data breaches could potentially be reduced as well. As an example, Kaminsky said that with rate limiting controls, only the money from a cash register is stolen by a hacker, as opposed to stealing all of a company's corporate profits for a month.

  • Linux TCP Flaw allows Hackers to Hijack Internet Traffic and Inject Malware Remotely
  • Our Encrypted Email Service is Safe Against Linux TCP Vulnerability

    ProtonMail is not vulnerable to the recently announced Linux TCP Vulnerability

In limiting open source efforts, the government takes a costly gamble

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OSS
Security

The vast majority of companies are now realizing the value of open sourcing their software and almost all have done so for at least certain projects. These days Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple and almost every major company is releasing code to the open source community at a constant rate.

As is the case with many cutting edge developments it’s taking governments a while to catch on and understand the value in going open source. But now governments around the world are beginning to take the view that as their software is funded by the public, it belongs to the public and should be open for public use and are starting to define codified policies for its release.

[...]

The vast majority of code is still not classified and therefore, much higher levels of open sourcing are possible. While a bigger embrace of open source may seem like a risk, the real danger lies in small, overly-cautious implementation which is costing taxpayers by the day and making us all less secure.

Read more

More Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Volkswagen Created A 'Backdoor' To Basically All Its Cars... And Now Hackers Can Open All Of Them

    In other words, VW created a backdoor, and assumed that it would remain hidden. But it did not.

    This is exactly the kind of point that we've been making about the problems of requiring any kind of backdoor and not enabling strong encryption. Using a single encryption key across every device is simply bad security. Forcing any kind of backdoor into any security system creates just these kinds of vulnerabilities -- and eventually someone's going to figure out how they work.

    On a related note, the article points out that the researchers who found this vulnerability are the same ones who also found another vulnerability a few years ago that allowed them to start the ignition of a bunch of VW vehicles. And VW's response... was to sue them and try to keep the vulnerability secret for nearly two years. Perhaps, rather than trying to sue these researchers, they should have thrown a bunch of money at them to continue their work, alert VW and help VW make their cars safer and better protected.

  • Software Freedom Doesn't Kill People, Your Security Through Obscurity Kills People

    The time has come that I must speak out against the inappropriate rhetoric used by those who (ostensibly) advocate for FLOSS usage in automotive applications.

    There was a catalyst that convinced me to finally speak up. I heard a talk today from a company representative of a software supplier for the automotive industry. He said during his talk: "putting GPLv3 software in cars will kill people" and "opening up the source code to cars will cause more harm than good". These statements are completely disingenuous. Most importantly, it ignores the fact that proprietary software in cars is at least equally, if not more, dangerous. At least one person has already been killed in a crash while using a proprietary software auto-control system. Volkswagen decided to take a different route; they decided to kill us all slowly (rather than quickly) by using proprietary software to lie about their emissions and illegally polluting our air.

    Meanwhile, there has been not a single example yet about use of GPLv3 software that has harmed anyone. If you have such an example, email it to me and I promise to add it right here to this blog post.

  • Linux Networking Flaw Allows Attacker To Trick Safety Mechanism

Security News

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Security
  • White House aims to secure open source government programs

    The White House unveils a new open source government policy and new research estimates the government's zero-day exploit stockpile to be smaller than expected.

  • How Governments Open Sourcing Code Helps Us Be More Secure

    The idea of governments releasing their proprietary code isn’t some pipe dream, it’s slowly becoming a reality in many countries and starting a much needed public discussion in others. Governments around the world are beginning to understand that their software is funded by the public, and therefore belongs to the public and should be accessible for their use. Bulgaria just passed a law which mandates that all code written for the government must be released as open source. Similarly, the United States is starting a 3-year pilot requiring all US agencies to release at least 20% of all federally-funded custom code as open source. France, Norway, Brazil and other countries have also initiated their own government open source programs to ensure more government funded code will be released as open source.

  • 2046 is the last year your CEO has a business major [Ed: says Juniper which put back doors in its software?]
  • DARPA's Machine Challenge Solves CrackAddr Puzzle

    Seven autonomous supercomputers faced off against each other in DARPA's Cyber Grand Challenge (CGC) event on the first day of the DEFCON security conference. In the end, a system known as 'Mayhem' won the $2 million grand prize and in the process helped solve a decade-old security challenge that revolved around detecting a particular type of vulnerability.

    Mike Walker, the DARPA program manager responsible for CGC, commented during a press conference that some bugs are so well known that they become famous. One such example is CrackAddr, the name of a function that can split up parts of an email address.

  • New Linux Malware Installs Bitcoin Mining Software on Infected Device

Security News

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Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Linux malware turns victim's machines into crypto-currency miners [Ed: Linux "malware exploits flaw in Redis NoSQL" is not correct. Not Linux problem, not a flaw either but misconfiguration]
  • Researchers announce Linux kernel “network snooping” bug
  • Microsoft's compromised Secure Boot implementation

    There's been a bunch of coverage of this attack on Microsoft's Secure Boot implementation, a lot of which has been somewhat confused or misleading. Here's my understanding of the situation.

    Windows RT devices were shipped without the ability to disable Secure Boot. Secure Boot is the root of trust for Microsoft's User Mode Code Integrity (UMCI) feature, which is what restricts Windows RT devices to running applications signed by Microsoft. This restriction is somewhat inconvenient for developers, so Microsoft added support in the bootloader to disable UMCI. If you were a member of the appropriate developer program, you could give your device's unique ID to Microsoft and receive a signed blob that disabled image validation. The bootloader would execute a (Microsoft-signed) utility that verified that the blob was appropriately signed and matched the device in question, and would then insert it into an EFI Boot Services variable[1]. On reboot, the boot loader reads the blob from that variable and integrates that policy, telling later stages to disable code integrity validation.

More Security News

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Security
  • FreeBSD devs ponder changes to security processes

    The developers of FreeBSD have announced they'll change the way they go about their business, after users queried why known vulnerabilities weren't being communicated to users.

    This story starts with an anonymous GitHub post detailing some vulnerabilities in the OS, specifically in freebsd-update, libarchive, bspatch and portsnap. Some of the problems in that post were verified and the FreeBSD devs started working on repairs.

  • Your Linux Distro Can Be Hacked In 60 Seconds Due To Serious TCP Flaw: Research [Ed: This headline is nonsense and shows that the author lacks technical understanding of it.]
  • Virtual Machine Introspection: A Security Innovation With New Commercial Applications

    A few weeks ago, Citrix and Bitdefender launched XenServer 7 and Bitdefender Hypervisor Introspection, which together compose the first commercial application of the Xen Project Hypervisor’s Virtual Machine Introspection (VMI) infrastructure. In this article, we will cover why this technology is revolutionary and how members of the Xen Project Community and open source projects that were early adopters of VMI (most notably LibVMI and DRAKVUF) collaborated to enable this technology.

  • 10 IoT Security Best Practices For IT Pros

    IT professionals have to treat internet of things (IoT) vulnerabilities as they would vulnerabilities in databases or web applications. Any flaw can bring unwelcome attention, for those making affected products and those using them. Any flaw may prove useful to compromise other systems on the network. When everything is connected, security is only as strong as the weakest node on the network.

  • Like The Rest Of The Internet Of Things, Most 'Smart' Locks Are Easily Hacked

    Smart refrigerators that leak your e-mail credentials. Smart TVs that collect but then fail to secure your living room conversations. Smart thermostats that can be loaded with ransomware. Smart vehicles that can be hacked and potentially kill you. This is the end result of "Internet of Things" evangelists and companies that for the last half-decade put hype and profit (the cart) well ahead of consumer privacy and security (the horse), in the process exposing us all to thousands of new attack vectors in homes and businesses around the world.

Security News

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Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more

Calamares Release and Adoption

  • Calamares 3.0 Universal Linux Installer Released, Drops Support for KPMcore 2
    Calamares, the open-source distribution-independent system installer, which is used by many GNU/Linux distributions, including the popular KaOS, Netrunner, Chakra GNU/Linux, and recently KDE Neon, was updated today to version 3.0. Calamares 3.0 is a major milestone, ending the support for the 2.4 series, which recently received its last maintenance update, versioned 2.4.6, bringing numerous improvements, countless bug fixes, and some long-anticipated features, including a brand-new PythonQt-based module interface.
  • Due to Popular Request, KDE Neon Is Adopting the Calamares Graphical Installer
    KDE Neon maintainer Jonathan Riddell is announcing today the immediate availability of the popular Calamares distribution-independent Linux installer framework on the Developer Unstable Edition of KDE Neon. It would appear that many KDE Neon users have voted for Calamares to become the default graphical installer system used for installing the Linux-based operating system on their personal computers. Indeed, Calamares is a popular installer framework that's being successfully used by many distros, including Chakra, Netrunner, and KaOS.

Red Hat Financial News