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Security

Report: NSA has little success cracking Tor

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Security

computerworld.com: The agency has attacked other software, including Firefox, in order to compromise the anonymity tool, according to documents

Linux is more secure but not invulnerable

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Linux
Security

techrepublic.com: Jack Wallen believes Linux is more secure than other platforms, but it's only as secure as the packages installed.

Linux “HoT” bank Trojan: Failed malware

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Security
  • Linux “HoT” bank Trojan: Failed malware
  • Shuttleworth: Prism Will Drive Cloud to ‘Other Jurisdictions’
  • NSA 'altered random-number generator'
  • Federal Courts Still Scaremongering About Spooky "Open Source" Software
  • ‘Hand-of-Thief’ Undergoing Construction to Become Commercially Viable
  • Is OpenSSL's Cryptography Broken?
  • How to create an encrypted zip file on Linux
  • Really basic intro to encrypted filesystems in openSUSE
  • What You Need to Know About Encryption on The Internet
  • Open Source Security
  • Semplice Linux 5 Will Protect You from NSA

Torvalds shoots down call to yank 'backdoored' Intel RdRand in Linux crypto

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Linux
Security

theregister.co.uk: 'We actually know what we are doing. You don't' says kernel boss. "Where do I start a petition to raise the IQ and kernel knowledge of people?"

Also: Torvalds suggests poison and sabotage for ARM SoC designers

Worms and Linux

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Linux
Security

linuxjournal.com: If you look back at the history of computer worms, you'll see that the computer worms that caused the most damage were directed toward the Microsoft Windows OS. Is this because of the number of Windows vulnerabilities, or is it merely due to the number of Windows users? The question remains unanswered. Meanwhile, apart from the Morris worm, very few worms have been directed toward Linux.

Who's Afraid of Linux Malware?

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Linux
Security

linuxinsider.com (blog safari): As desktop Linux's popularity grows, so, too, do concerns about viruses and malware. "Malware will come to target consumers on Linux," said blogger Chris Travers. "When it does, we will need to address the challenges it poses.

Hand of Thief malware could be dangerous (if you install it)

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Linux
Security

techrepublic.com: Jack Wallen takes a look at the Hand of Thief trojan and what it means for the Linux community.

“Hand of Thief” banking trojan doesn’t do Windows—but it does Linux

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Linux
Security

arstechnica.com: Signaling criminals' growing interest in attacking non-Windows computers, researchers have discovered banking fraud malware that targets people using the open-source Linux operating system.

Is Linux Operating System Virus Free?

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Linux
Security

tecmint.com: Linux System is considered to be free from Viruses and Malware. What is the truth behind this notion and how far it is correct ? We will be discussing all these stuffs in this article.

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