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Security

Detect insider threats with Linux auditing

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Security

linux.com: Organizations of all sizes need to mitigate the risk of insider threats. Misconduct by authorized users represents a grave threat to an organization. You can secure your network perimeter with intrusion detection systems, firewalls, and virus scanners, but don't neglect to monitor authorized users. The Linux Audit daemon can help you detect violations of your security policies.

Open source: New target of malware?

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Security

ZDNet: The recent OpenOffice worm may be a sign that malware writers are starting to target the increasingly popular open-source software, industry experts say.

Linux configure point to point tunneling PPTP VPN client for Microsoft PPTP vpn server

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Linux
Hardware
Software
Security
BSD
Ubuntu
HowTos

With this tip you will be able to work from home using VPN and that too from Linux / FreeBSD system for the proprietary Microsoft Point-to-Point vpn server.

Introducing Remo - An Easy Way to Secure an Insecure Online Application with ModSecurity

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Linux
Security
HowTos

Say you have a nasty application on your Apache webserver that has been installed by some people from the marketing department and you can neither remove nor patch it. Maybe it is a time problem, a lack of know-how, a lack of source-code, or possibly even political reasons. Consequently you need to protect it without touching it. There is ModSecurity, but they say this is only for experts. A straightforward alternative is Remo, a graphical rule editor for ModSecurity that comes with a whitelist approach.

OpenOffice worm hits Mac, Linux and Windows

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Security
OOo

builderau: Malware targeting OpenOffice documents is spreading through multiple operating systems including Mac OS, Windows and Linux, according to Symantec.

Windows vs Linux security report card redux

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Security

zdnet blogs: Jeff Jones has expanded his project to count security flaws (publicly reported and fixed) in the major workstation operating systems and his latest numbers show Windows Vista has by far the best security profile when compared to the major Linux distributions.

How To Block Spam Before It Enters The Server (Postfix)

Filed under
Linux
Security
HowTos

The last few weeks have seen a dramatic increase in spam (once again). Estimates say that spam makes now up for 80 - 90% of all emails, and many mail servers have difficulties in managing the additional load caused by the latest spam, and spam filters such as SpamAssassin do not recognize large parts of that spam as they did before. Fortunately, we can block a big amount of that spam at the MTA level.

A New Vector For Hackers -- Firefox Add-Ons

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Security

Washington Post: Makers of some of the most popular extensions, or "add-ons," for Mozilla's Firefox Web browser may have inadvertently introduced security holes that criminals could use to steal sensitive data from millions of users.

Owning computers via spelling mistakes

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Security

infoworld: Symantec researchers have detailed a painfully simple attack method that hackers may already be using to bypass security protections and break into UNIX and Linux-based computers.

OpenOffice worm downloads bunny porn

Filed under
Security

iTNews: A newly-discovered worm targeting OpenOffice attempts to download indecent JPEG images onto compromised Windows, Mac and Linux PCs.

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Samsung to host first open-source conference

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Linux 3.17-rc5

So I should probably have delayed this until Wednesday for sentimental reasons: that will be 23 years since I uploaded the 0.01 source tree. But I'm not an overly sentimental person, so screw that. I'm doing my normal Sunday release. And as I mentioned in the rc4 notes, the previous rc was pretty small, possibly because neither Greg nor Davem had sent in any updates that week. Guess what? David's networking updates came in an hour after I did rc4, and sure enough Greg came in this week too, so - surprise surprise - rc5 isn't as small as rc4 was. Oh well. It was too good to last. I also got a report of an *old* performance regression in the dentry cache (since 3.10 - positively ancient), and that in turn made me look around some more, and there were a few other special cases that could cause us to not do as well as we should. I fixed some of it, and Al fixed the rest. So hopefully we not only fixed the reported regression, but are actually doing better than we used to. Anyway, the size of rc5 means that I'm certainly not cutting the release early, which means that I will have to think about exactly what I will do about the next merge window. Because it looks like it might end up conflicting with my travel around LinuxCon EU. I haven't quite decided what I'll do - I might release 3.17 normally, but then just not open the merge window due to travel. Or, if there are more issues than I think there will be, maybe I'll delay the 3.17 release. We'll see. Regardless - the rc5 changes is about half drivers (networking, gpu, usb, input, ata..) with the rest being mostly a mix of filesystem updates (the aforementioned performance thing in the core vfs layer, but also some NFS export issues found by Al and misc other stuff), architecture updates (arm, parisc, s390) and core networking. And a smattering of other. Shortlog appended. In other words, things look fairly normal, even if I'd have been happier with rc5 being smaller. But with the bump from networking and drivers, I'm not going to claim that this was either unexpected or particularly scary. I'm hoping we're done now, and that rc6 and rc7 will be noticeably calmer. Knock wood. Linus Read more

Torvalds says he has no strong opinions on systemd

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