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Security

Dutch government to shore up open source security

Filed under
OSS
Security

The Dutch Parliament on Tuesday approved a EUR 0.5 million budget to develop and improve existing open source encryption solutions that are a crucial part of the Internet. The plan is to enhance projects such as OpenSSL, LibreSSL or PolarSSL (mbed TLS).

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Symantec: iOS and OS X users face a surge of fresh security threats

    SECURITY FIRM Symantec has warned that the hacker threat to Apple users has reached unprecedented levels.

    The firm reckons that Apple is a victim of its success, becoming a bigger target as its user base grows. To be fair to Apple most of the problem relates to jailbroken devices, which is not a thing that the firm recommends. We have seen incidents recently that make the most of this. The threat applies to mobile software and the desktop.

  • DoS attack brings UK universities to a virtual standstill

    According to the Telegraph newspaper, universities across the country have been hit by DoS attacks. This means in some cases no internet access, and that means students will have to study like it's 1980 something.

  • U.K. Cops Are Trying to Scare Teen Hackers With House Calls

    It was a summer morning, officer Paul Hastings recalls, when he arrived at a suspected hacker’s house in the northern English city of Hull. There, police had tracked one of the people who’d signed up online for a hacking service called Lizard Stresser that was used to attack companies including Microsoft, Amazon.com, and Sony at the end of 2014. This particularly fearsome cybervigilante was asleep when Hastings knocked, so his dad answered the door.

    The visit was one of about 50 U.K. police made this year to people they say used the Lizard Stresser site, many of them children. The Hull suspect, a teenager, couldn’t have done anything wrong, his dad told Hastings. He spent all his time upstairs, on his computer.

    [...]

    Teen hackers have been pop culture figures since Matthew Broderick starred in WarGames, and the U.K. has a long history with juvenile black hats. In 1994, when U.S. Air Force researchers found an unauthorized user on their systems downloading data, they tracked the hacker to a North London suburb. Working with London police, they found their culprit: a 16-year-old boy in an attic bedroom, as journalist Gordon Corera recounts in Intercept: The Secret History of Computers and Spies.

Open source encryption? Now Netherlands votes to help fund security projects

Filed under
OSS
Security

In what some might see as swimming against the political mainstream, the Netherlands parliament has just decided to back open-source web security with hard cash.

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Security Leftovers

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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security

Security More Leftovers

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Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Elasticsearch Servers Targeted by Linux-Based Botnet Operators

    A honeypot experiment ran by AlientVault has shown that the recent security vulnerabilities discovered in Elasticsearch servers over the summer are now actively being used by botnet operators.

  • Researchers Found Another Malware Targeting Linux Users

    Many analysts believe Rebooke is a harmless Trojan which is true, but its simple design allows the attacker to maneuver the type of attacks which can allow them to deliver powerful payloads on the systems.

  • Let’s Encrypt May Improve Security for Regular People More Than Any Other Initiative This Decade

    Secure websites have always been standard for ecommerce companies like Amazon or Shopify, and in recent years companies that handle private communications like Google and Facebook have invested millions of dollars in enabling encryption for all users. But what about everyone else?

  • Public Beta: December 3, 2015

    Let’s Encrypt will enter Public Beta on December 3, 2015. Once we’ve entered Public Beta our systems will be open to anyone who would like to request a certificate. There will no longer be a requirement to sign up and wait for an invitation.

    Our Limited Beta started on September 12, 2015. We’ve issued over 11,000 certificates since then, and this operational experience has given us confidence that our systems are ready for an open Public Beta.

    It’s time for the Web to take a big step forward in terms of security and privacy. We want to see HTTPS become the default. Let’s Encrypt was built to enable that by making it as easy as possible to get and manage certificates.

  • Let’s encrypt automation on Debian
  • DHS to Silicon Valley: Tell us how to secure this “Internet of Things”

    The US Department of Homeland Security has announced that its Silicon Valley Office (SVO)—the agency's liaison point with the technology industry—will hold an event on December 10 to kick off a recruiting drive for startups and "non-traditional small businesses" interested in latching onto government funding. The Industry Day, being held at the Menlo Park, California, offices of SRI International, will be focused on the current leading source of worry for DHS officials: the "Internet of Things" (IoT).

  • Millions of smart TVs, phones and routers at risk from old vulnerability

    There's growing concern over how manufacturers of devices such as routers and smart TVs deal with security vulnerabilities that emerge in their products. Their patching regimes are not nearly as rigorous as those from major software manufacturers, which could expose consumers to attacks as the products age.

LibreOffice 5.1 Up to Beta State, the Hunting Session Squashes Nearly 400 Bugs

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LibO
Security

The first Beta build of the upcoming LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite was silently released at the end of November 2015 for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

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Linux Users Targeted by New Rekoobe Trojan

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Linux
Security

Linux users are about to get a nasty surprise for Christmas in the form of a new trojan targeting the Linux operating system, discovered by Dr.Web, a Russian-based antivirus maker, and named Rekoobe (or its more technical name: Linux.Rekoobe.1).

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today's leftovers

  • Calamares 2.3 Installer Released
  • ANNOUNCE: libosinfo 0.3.1 released
    I am happy to announce a new release of libosinfo, version 0.3.1 is now available, signed with key DAF3 A6FD B26B 6291 2D0E 8E3F BE86 EBB4 1510 4FDF (4096R). All historical releases are available from the project download page.
  • There and Back Again: The MongoDB Cloud Story
    Before it was a database company, MongoDB was a cloud company. Founded in 2007 and originally known as 10gen, the company originally intended to build a Java cloud platform. After building a database it called MongoDB, the company realized that the infrastructure software it had built to support its product was more popular than the product itself, and the PaaS company pivoted to become a database company – eventually taking the obvious step of renaming itself to reflect its new purpose.
  • C++17: New Features Coming To 33-Year-Old Programming Language
    The C++17 standard is taking shape and adding new features to the vintage programming language. This major update aims to make C++ an easier language to work with and brings powerful technical specifications.
  • Clearing the Keystone Environment

GNU/Linux Leftovers

Red Hat Summit

  • Red Hat Summit Advocates the Power of Participation
    Red Hat hosted its annual Red Hat Summit customer event June 28-30 at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, with a theme of harnessing the power of participation. Once again, the DevNation developer event, which is the successor to JBoss World, was co-located with Red Hat Summit. For JBoss, 2016 is a particularly significant year as it marks 10 years since Red Hat acquired it. At DevNation, Red Hat announced the new JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7 release, providing new cloud-enhanced capabilities for Red Hat's flagship middleware platform. JBoss is now also working to help enable Java for the container era, with the launch of the MicroProfile Project, an effort to optimize enterprise Java for a microservices architecture. Java wasn't the only focus of DevNation this year either, as Microsoft took center stage too, announcing the availability of its .NET Core for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the Red Hat Summit and DevNation 2016 events.
  • How Red Hat is tailoring OpenStack to fit … everyone
    Even though there have been no major changes announced to the OpenStack platform of late, it was still one of the most talked about subjects at this year’s Red Hat Summit. Red Hat plays a significant role in the development of the platform and is very proud of its contribution to the community.
  • New technologies foster an open-source environment
    In 2007, when 3scale, Inc. was founded, some people thought it was crazy to be investing so much time and energy into API. But Steven Willmott, CEO of 3scale, Inc., said that even at that time his team knew that the future was API-driven, and they wanted to help that happen.

Leftovers: Gaming