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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • FedEx Will Pay You $5 to Install Flash on Your Machine

    FedEx is making you an offer you can’t afford to accept. It’s offering to give you $5 (actually, it’s a discount on orders over $30) if you’ll just install Adobe Flash on your machine.

    Nobody who knows anything about online security uses Flash anymore, except when it’s absolutely necessary. Why? Because Flash is the poster child for the “security-vulnerability-of-the-hour” club — a group that includes another Adobe product, Acrobat. How unsafe is Flash? Let’s put it this way: seven years ago, Steve Jobs announced that Flash was to be forever banned from Apple’s mobile products. One of the reasons he cited was a report from Symantec that “highlighted Flash for having one of the worst security records in 2009.”

    Flash security hasn’t gotten any better since.

  • Every once in a while someone suggests to me that curl and libcurl would do better if rewritten in a “safe language”
  • An insecure dishwasher has entered the IoT war against humanity

    Regel says that he has contacted Miele on a number of occasions about the issue, but had failed to get a response to his missives, and this has no updated information on the vulnerability.

    He added, bleakly that "we are not aware of an actual fix."

  • Monday Witness: It's Time to Reconize a Civil Right Not to be Connected

    Along with death and taxes, two things appear inevitable. The first is that Internet of Things devices will not only be built into everything we can imagine, but into everything we can't as well. The second is that IoT devices will have wholly inadequate security, if they have any security at all. Even with strong defenses, there is the likelihood that governmental agencies will gain covert access to IoT devices anyway.

    What this says to me is that we need a law that guarantees consumers the right to buy versions of products that are not wirelessly enabled at all.

  • Remember kids, if you're going to disclose, disclose responsibly!

    If you pay any attention to the security universe, you're aware that Tavis Ormandy is basically on fire right now with his security research. He found the Cloudflare data leak issue a few weeks back, and is currently going to town on LastPass. The LastPass crew seems to be dealing with this pretty well, I'm not seeing a lot of complaining, mostly just info and fixes which is the right way to do these things.

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find

    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.

  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series

    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL.

    [...]

    With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.

  • NextCloud, a security analysis

    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement.

    As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.

  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash

    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Google Threatens to Distrust Symantec SSL/TLS Certificates

    Google is warning that it intends to deprecate and remove trust in Symantec-issued SSL/TLS certificates, as Symantec shoots back that the move is unwarranted.

  • Hackers Stole My Website…And I Pulled Off A $30,000 Sting Operation To Get It Back

    I learned that my site was stolen on a Saturday. Three days later I had it back, but only after the involvement of fifty or so employees of six different companies, middle-of-the-night conferences with lawyers, FBI intervention, and what amounted to a sting operation that probably should have starred Sandra Bullock instead of…well…me.

  • Google Summer of Code

    The Linux Foundation umbrella organization is responsible for this year's WireGuard GSoC, so if you're a student, write "Linux Foundation" as your mentoring organization, and then specify in your proposal your desire to work with WireGuard, listing "Jason Donenfeld" as your mentor.

  • Takeaways from Bruce Schneier’s talk: “Security and Privacy in a Hyper-connected World”

    Bruce Schneier is one of my favorite speakers when it comes to the topic of all things security. His talk from IBM Interconnect 2017, “Security and Privacy in a Hyper-connected World“, covered a wide range of security concerns.

  • [Older] Make America Secure Again: Trump Should Order U.S. Spy Agencies to Responsibly Disclose Cyber Vulnerabilities

    Last week, WikiLeaks released a trove of CIA documents that detail many of the spy agency’s hacking capabilities. These documents, if genuine (and early reports suggest that they are), validate concerns that U.S. spy agencies are stockpiling cybersecurity vulnerabilities. The intelligence community uses undisclosed vulnerabilities to develop tools that can penetrate the computer systems and networks of its foreign targets. Unfortunately, since everyone uses the same technology in today’s global economy, each of these vulnerabilities also represents a threat to American businesses and individuals. In the future, rather than hoard this information, the CIA and other intelligence agencies should commit to responsibly disclosing vulnerabilities it discovers to the private sector so that security holes can be patched.

  • Announcing Keyholder: Secure, shared shell access

    The new software is a ssh-agent proxy that allows a group of trusted users to share an SSH identity without exposing the contents of that identity’s private key.

    [...]

    A common use of the ssh-agent is to “forward” your agent to a remote machine (using the -A flag in the OpenSSH client). After you’ve forwarded your ssh-agent, you can use the socket that that agent creates to access any of your many (now unencrypted) keys, and login to any other machines for which you may have keys in your ssh-agent. So, too, potentially, can all the other folks that have root access to the machine to which you’ve forwarded your ssh-agent.

  • pitchfork

    After years of training journalists and NGOs communication and operational security, after years of conducting research into the tools and protocols used, it took some more years developing a reasonable answer to most of the issues encountered during all this time.

    In todays world of commercially available government malware you don't want to store your encryption keys on your easily infected computer. You want them stored on something that you could even take into a sauna or a hot-tub - maintaining continuous physical contact.

    So people who care about such things use external smartcard-based crypto devices like Ubikey Neos or Nitrokeys (formerly Cryptosticks). The problems with these devices is that you have to enter PIN codes on your computer that you shouldn't trust, that they are either designed for centralized use in organizations, or they are based mostly on PGP.

Security Leftovers

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Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • How worried should your organisation be about cyber espionage - and what can you do about it?

    Computerworld UK speaks with Jarno Niemela, senior security researcher at F-Secure.

  • Inverse Law of CVEs

    I've started a project to put the CVE data into Elasticsearch and see if there is anything clever we can learn about it. Ever if there isn't anything overly clever, it's fun to do. And I get to make pretty graphs, which everyone likes to look at.

  • eBay Asks Users to Downgrade Security

    The company wanted me to switch from using a hardware key fob when logging into eBay to receiving a one-time code sent via text message. I found it remarkable that eBay, which at one time was well ahead of most e-commerce companies in providing more robust online authentication options, is now essentially trying to downgrade my login experience to a less-secure option.

  • Practical basics of reproducible builds
  • License Agreements and Changes Are Coming

    The OpenSSL license is rather unique and idiosyncratic. It reflects views from when its predecessor, SSLeay, started twenty years ago. As a further complication, the original authors were hired by RSA in 1998, and the code forked into two versions: OpenSSL and RSA BSAFE SSL-C. (See Wikipedia for discussion.) I don’t want get into any specific details, and I certainly don’t know them all.

Security and Bugs

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Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Devops embraces security measures to build safer software

    Devops isn’t simply transforming how developers and operations work together to deliver better software faster, it is also changing how developers view application security. A recent survey from software automation and security company Sonatype found that devops teams are increasingly adopting security automation to create better and safer software.

  • This Xfce Bug Is Wrecking Users’ Monitors

    The Xfce desktop environment for Linux may be fast and flexible — but it’s currently affected by a very serious flaw.

    Users of this lightweight alternative to GNOME and KDE have reported that the choice of default wallpaper in Xfce is causing damaging to laptop displays and LCD monitors.

    And there’s damning photographic evidence to back the claims up.

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Windows flaw lets attackers take over A-V software

    A 15-year-old flaw in every version of Windows right from XP to Windows 10 allows a malicious attacker to take control of a system through the anti-virus software running on the system.

  • Google Continues to Make Strides in Improving Android Security
  • Google cites progress in Android security, but patching issues linger
  • Dark Matter

    Today, March 23rd 2017, WikiLeaks releases Vault 7 "Dark Matter", which contains documentation for several CIA projects that infect Apple Mac Computer firmware (meaning the infection persists even if the operating system is re-installed) developed by the CIA's Embedded Development Branch (EDB). These documents explain the techniques used by CIA to gain 'persistence' on Apple Mac devices, including Macs and iPhones and demonstrate their use of EFI/UEFI and firmware malware.

    Among others, these documents reveal the "Sonic Screwdriver" project which, as explained by the CIA, is a "mechanism for executing code on peripheral devices while a Mac laptop or desktop is booting" allowing an attacker to boot its attack software for example from a USB stick "even when a firmware password is enabled". The CIA's "Sonic Screwdriver" infector is stored on the modified firmware of an Apple Thunderbolt-to-Ethernet adapter.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Customer security awareness: alerting you to vulnerabilities that are of real risk
  • Cisco's WikiLeaks Security Vulnerability Exposure: 10 Things Partners Need To Know

    Cisco's security team has discovered that hundreds of its networking devices contain a vulnerability that could allow attackers to remotely executive malicious code and take control of the affected device.

    "We are committed to responsible disclosure, protecting our customers, and building the strongest security architecture and products that are designed through our Trustworthy Systems initiatives," said a Cisco spokesperson in an email to CRN regarding the vulnerability.

    Some channel partners of the San Jose, Calif.-based networking giant are already advising customers on how to bypass the critical security flaw. Here are 10 important items that Cisco channel partners should know about the security vulnerability.

  • Linux had a killer flaw for 11 years and no one noticed

    One of the key advantages of Open sauce software is that it is supposed to be easier to spot and fix software flaws, however Linux has had a local privilege escalation flaw for 11 years and no-one has noticed.

    The vulnerability, tracked as CVE-2017-6074, is over 11 years old and was likely introduced in 2005 when the Linux kernel gained support for the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP). It was discovered last week and was patched by the kernel developers on Friday.

  • 6 Hot Internet of Things (IoT) Security Technologies
  • Microsoft Losing Its Edge

    However, despite these improvements in code cleanness and security technologies, it hasn’t quite proven itself when faced with experienced hackers at contests such as Pwn2Own. At last year’s edition of Pwn2Own, Edge proved to be a little better than Internet Explorer and Safari, but it still ended up getting hacked twice, while Chrome was only partially hacked once.

    Things seem to have gotten worse, rather than better, for Edge. At this year’s Pwn2Own, Microsoft’s browser was hacked no less than five times.

  • Microsoft loses the Edge at hacking contest

    And for every hack perpetrated against Edge, there was a corresponding attack against the Windows 10 kernel, indicating that it has a way to go in terms of security, according to Tom's Hardware.

  • Wikileaks: Apple, Microsoft and Google must fix CIA exploits within 90 days

    The 90-day deadline is the same that Google's own Project Zero security group provides to companies when it uncovers flaws in their software. If a company has failed to patch its software accordingly, Project Zero publishes details of the flaw whether the vendor likes it or not.

  • NTPsec Project announces 0.9.7
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More in Tux Machines

Subgraph OS Alpha and NuTyX 9.1

  • A new Subgraph OS Alpha ISO is available for download.
    This is a release mainly targeting some bugs that were present in the last available ISO. We are working on some major new features that aren't done yet or aren't yet robust enough to be included in a release to users. Some of those new features are described below. We really should have released an ISO sooner than this as there were some annoying bugs that got in the way of new users trying Subgraph OS for the first time. We've setup a new, more aggressive release schedule and should be making non-release ISO builds available as we produce them monthly.
  • NuTyX 9.1 available with cards 2.3.3.0
    The NuTyX team is please to annonce the 9.1 release of NuTyX. NuTyX 9.0 comes with kernel lts 4.9.23, glibc 2.25, gcc 6.3.0, binutils 2.28, python 3.6.0, xorg-server 1.19.2, qt 5.8.0, plasma 5.9.4, kf5 5.31.0, gnome 3.22.2, mate 1.18.0, xfce4 4.12.3, firefox 54.0.1, etc.... New Isos are available in 32 bits and 64 bits. sizes are respectively 246 MB and 247 MB on http://downloads.nutyx.org This is a maintenance release of the 9.0 branche of NuTyX. It is possible to make an upgrade of your system without problems. It's no need to reinstall your NuTyX. If the automatic upgrade process is activate, it will be done at next shutdown. Available graphical interfaces are: kde5, gnome, mate, xfce4, lxde, flwm, jwm, ratpoison, blackbox, fluxbox, openbox, bspwm, icewm, twm, etc.

Games: SteamWorld Dig 2, Coma: Recut, Rusted Warfare, Rise to Ruins

  • Digging for riches and falling onto spikes in SteamWorld Dig 2, now available for Linux
    It hooked me in way more than I though it would, I could hardly stop myself playing. Image & Form have created such a fantastic world to explore that's rammed full of imagination and personality throughout. A solid Linux release and a pleasantly surprising game.
  • Linux version of 'The Coma: Recut' removed at release after taking pre-orders
    Sadly it seems the Linux version of The Coma: Recut [Official Site] vanished at release, even after taking pre-orders. We all know all too well that pre-orders have inherent risks attached to them. This is especially true when it comes to Linux releases. Steam is full of cases of developers pulling out Linux support right on release without any prior indication.
  • Rusted Warfare, the sweet 2D RTS has a new major release with tons of goodies
    Do you love RTS games? Rusted Warfare [Steam] is one you seriously need to look at. This sweet 2D RTS works great on Linux and just had a huge update. The first major new feature is a replay system. You can now re-watch previous online games, but the icing in the cake is that you can jump in at any point and take over the game. I'm hoping they roll that out to offline battles too, as it sounds great.
  • Rise to Ruins updated with an overhauled combat system along with bows and arrows
    The village building god game Rise to Ruins [Official Site] has expanded once again. This latest development release 'InDev 28 Unstable 3' overhauls the combat system. Ranged attacks are now possible! For those unfamiliar with the title, it mixes up a few genres to create a pretty unique game. It has elements of a god sim, a city builder and tower defence and it's really quite fun. It has multiple game modes to choose from, with the ability to customize things to your liking.

XFree KWin, Plasma, KDE, and Qt/GTK

  • Announcing the XFree KWin project
    Over the last weeks I concentrated my work on KWin on what I call the XFree KWin project. The idea is to be able to start KWin/Wayland without XWayland support. While most of the changes required for it are already in Plasma 5.11, not everything got ready in time, but now everything is under review on phabricator, so it’s a good point in time to talk about this project.
  • Adapta Theme is Now Available for the #KDE Plasma Desktop
    A new port brings the Adapta GTK theme to the KDE Plasma 5 desktop for the first time, news that will please fans of its famous flat stylings.
  • A New Project To Let You Run Qt Apps With GTK+ Windowing System Integration
    A Norwegian developer has developed a new Qt platform abstraction plug-in to let Qt applications make use of GTK+ for windowing system integration. The Qt apps rely upon GTK+ as a host toolkit to provide GTK menus, GTK for input, and other integration bits.
  • Ant is a Flat GTK Theme with a Bloody Bite
    Between Arc, Adapta and Numix it kind of feels like Linux has the whole flat GTK theme thing covered. But proving their’s always room for one more is Ant.

Android Leftovers