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Security

Go phish your own staff: Dev builds open-source fool-testing tool

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OSS
Security

The platform was written in Go and has been posted to GitHub where it's had more than 300 commits at the time of writing. It differs from some other anti-phishing platforms in part because it is hosted on premise rather than in the cloud, “There are many commercial offerings that provide phishing simulation/training [but] unfortunately, these are SaaS solutions that require you to hand over your data to someone else,” the GoFish team says.

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Tuesday's security advisories
  • Best practice - Don't serve writeable PHP files

    I deal with compromises often enough of PHP-based websites that I wish to improve hardening.

    One obvious way to improve things is to not serve PHP files which are writeable by the webserver-user. This would ensure that things like wp-content/uploads didn't get served as PHP if a compromise wrote valid PHP there.

  • New Cross-Platform Backdoors Go From Linux to Windows

    Kaspersky Lab has once again found a nasty little piece of malware that started out in Linux and made the jump to Windows. These cross-platform backdoors spy on the user and are by no means the first backdoor virus of this kind.

  • Obama’s $6bn Security Firewall EINSTEIN Is Not Good Enough To Protect The US Government

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has spent about $6 billion on a firewall named EINSTEIN intrusion detection system. Officially known as the National Cybersecurity Protection System, the firewall is being developed with an intention to protect the U.S. government agencies against the malicious cyber attacks.

  • Another Serious Bug Hits OpenSSL, But this Time, It's No Heartbleed

    OpenSSL, the open source encryption toolkit that made headlines in 2014 for the Heartbleed security bug, has been hit by another serious vulnerability. This time, however, the real-world damage seems minimal.

    The project disclosed the bug, which results from a new method for generating numbers used for key exchanges, on Jan. 28. It assigned the bug a high severity level, presumably since the flaw could be exploited in order to decrypt data that is encrypted using OpenSSL, the protocol widely used for encrypting information transmitted to and from HTTPS-protected websites.

The top 10 Linux security distros

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Linux
Security

Linux distros can be used for a lot of things, from games to education, but when it comes to security, there’s a whole mini-universe available.

Not only can you find distros made to protect your privacy, making sure you leave no trace as you move around the web, but also those that help you test your network and system security.

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • Your Smartphone Can Be Hacked Due To A Backdoor In Your Processor

    A new security vulnerability has been reported in the smartphones which use MediaTek Processors. MediaTek company is a Taiwan-based company which manufacturers processors for the budget range smartphones. The security bug was found because a debug feature was not closed on the smartphone after testing.

    A new bug has surfaced lately on the Android smartphones or tablets which use a MediaTek processor. These devices are vulnerable to remote hacking via a backdoor. This security vulnerability was discovered by a security researcher, Justin Case. The MediaTek company has been informed about the flaw. This security vulnerability is apparently due to a debug tool which was left open by MediaTek in the shipped devices.

  • Using IPv6 with Linux? You’ve likely been visited by Shodan and other scanners
  • Trojanized Android games hide malicious code inside images

    Over 60 Android games hosted on Google Play had Trojan-like functionality that allowed them to download and execute malicious code hidden inside images.

    The rogue apps were discovered by researchers from Russian antivirus vendor Doctor Web and were reported to Google last week. The researchers dubbed the new threat Android.Xiny.19.origin.

  • Google fixes multiple Wi-Fi flaws, mediaserver bugs in Android
  • On WebKit Security Updates

    Major desktop browsers push automatic security updates directly to users on a regular basis, so most users don’t have to worry about security updates. But Linux users are dependent on their distributions to release updates. Apple fixed over 100 vulnerabilities in WebKit last year, so getting updates out to users is critical.

Celebrating 15 Years of SELinux

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Red Hat
Security

On Dec. 22, 2000, the NSA released their code to the wider open source world in the form of SELinux, and in doing so forever changed the security landscape of not just Linux, but the technology world at large. A combination of policies and security frameworks, SELinux is one of the most widely-used Linux security modules. Without these innovations, Common Criteria, a crucial government security certification, would likely not exist for Linux.

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Kali Linux Literature

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GNU
Linux
Security
  • Migrating from Kali Linux 2 to Kali Linux 2016.1

    The first edition of Kali Linux Rolling, Kali 2016.1, was released more than a week ago. It marks the end of Kali Linux 2 and the beginning of a new release regime.

    It’s still based on Debian Testing, so existing users don’t have to do anything special but run a few commands to upgrade from Kali Linux 2 to Kali Linux 2016.1. Aside from installation images for the GNOME 3 desktop, there are also installation images for the Light edition, which uses the Xfce desktop environment. And there are also ARM installation images.

  • Kali Linux Cookbook eBook - $24 value, now free!

Lexumo Lands $4.89 Million Seed Round To Help Ensure Open Source Code Security

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OSS
Security

What has Lexumo created to warrant that kind of financial attention? It indexed all of the open source code in the world and created a cloud security service aimed at helping companies using open source code inside embedded systems or enterprise software. These groups can submit their code to the Lexumo service and it checks for any known security vulnerabilities. What’s more, it will then continuously monitor the code for updates and inform developers when one is available.

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Forcing out bugs with stress-ng

    I've also tried to make stress-ng portable, so it can build fine on GNU/Hurd and Debian kFreeBSD (with Linux specific tests not built-in of course). It also contains some architecture specific features, such as handling the data and instruction cache as well as the x86 rdrand instruction and cache line locking. If there are any ARM specific features than can be stressed I'd like to know and perhaps implement stressors for them.

  • OpenSSH and the dangers of unused code

    Unused code is untested code, which probably means that it harbors bugs—sometimes significant security bugs. That lesson has been reinforced by the recent OpenSSH "roaming" vulnerability. Leaving a half-finished feature only in the client side of the equation might seem harmless on a cursory glance but, of course, is not. Those who mean harm can run servers that "implement" the feature to tickle the unused code. Given that the OpenSSH project has a strong security focus (and track record), it is truly surprising that a blunder like this could slip through—and keep slipping through for roughly six years.

  • Why Is Usable Security Hard, and What Should We Do about it?
  • Linux-Based Botnets Accounted for More than Half of DDoS Attacks in Q4 2015

IPFire 2.17 Open Source Linux Firewall OS Gets OpenSSL 1.0.2f and OpenSSH 7.1p2

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OSS
Security

The IPFire development team announced last evening the immediate availability for download or update of the IPFire 2.17 Core Update 97 Linux kernel-based firewall distribution.

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Friday's security updates
  • Critical OpenSSL Patch Available. Patch Now!

    All versions of OpenSSL are vulnerable to CVE-2014-0195, but this vulnerability only affects DTLS clients or servers (look for SSL VPNs... not so much HTTPS).

  • Linux Trojan That Takes Screenshots and Records Audio Has a Windows Brother

    The Linux trojan that spied on users by taking screenshots of their desktop has now a Windows variant, as Kaspersky's security team has found out.

    The trojan, first discovered by Dr.Web and named Linux.Ekocms, and later also identified by Sophos as Linux/Mokes-A, and then by Kaspersky as Backdoor.Linux.Mokes.a, has caused some stir in the Linux community because it was one of the first spyware threats detected in the wild on the platform.

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More in Tux Machines

University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project of the Linux Foundation dedicated to creating open source software solutions for the automobile industry. It also leverages the ten billion dollar investment in the Linux kernel. The work of the AGL project enables software developers to keep pace with the demands of customers and manufacturers in this rapidly changing space, while encouraging collaboration. Walt Miner is the community manager for Automotive Grade Linux, and he spoke at LinuxCon in Toronto recently on how Automotive Grade Linux is changing the way automotive manufacturers develop software. He worked for Motorola Automotive, Continental Automotive, and Montevista Automotive program, and saw lots of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like Ford, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota in action over the years. Read more

Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more