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Security

Network Security Toolkit (NST) Linux OS Released Based on Fedora 24, Linux 4.6

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Red Hat
Security

Today, July 4, 2016, Ronald Henderson has announced the release of a new version of the Fedora-based Network Security Toolkit (NST) Linux distribution for network security analysis and monitoring.

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Progress Towards 100% HTTPS, June 2016
  • Exploiting Recursion in the Linux Kernel
  • Home Computers Connected to the Internet Aren't Private, Court Rules [iophk: "MS Windows == insecure, therefore all computer are game"]

    A judge in Virginia rules that people should have no expectation of privacy on their home PCs because no connected computer "is immune from invasion."
    A federal judge for the Eastern District of Virginia has ruled that the user of any computer that connects to the Internet should not have an expectation of privacy because computer security is ineffectual at stopping hackers.

    The June 23 ruling came in one of the many cases resulting from the FBI's infiltration of PlayPen, a hidden service on the Tor network that acted as a hub for child exploitation, and the subsequent prosecution of hundreds of individuals. To identify suspects, the FBI took control of PlayPen for two weeks and used, what it calls, a "network investigative technique," or NIT—a program that runs on a visitor's computer and identifies their Internet address.

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • 11 essential data security tips for travelers [iophk: "unfortunately VPNs have dated crypto"]

    I travel all over the world for my job, and for my hobbies. Although there are still plenty of places I haven't been, I've visited enough foreign countries that I don't deny it when someone calls me a world traveler. Over the years, I've experienced my fair share of foreign spying. I know what it's like to be snooped on.

    I'm no longer surprised when I suddenly get gobs of spam from a country I've visited. My best guess is that someone in the country intercepted my email and recorded my email address. I still get porn spam in Arabic and ads for weight loss products in Mandarin. I've had my laptop and USB keys searched at countless borders.

  • Yet another letsencrypt (ACME) client

    Well, I apparently joined the hordes of people writing ACME (the Protocol behind Let’s Encrypt) clients.

    Like the fairy tale Goldilocks, I couldn’t find a client in the right spot between minimalistic and full-featured for my needs: acme-tiny was too bare-bones; the official letsencrypt client (now called certbot) too huge; and simp_le came very close, but it’s support for pluggable certificate formats made it just a bit too big for me.

  • Keynote - Complexity: The Enemy of Security
  • Security Holes Found in Widely-Used File Compression Library, Leaving Other Products Dangerously Exposed
  • StartEncrypt considered harmful today

    Recently, one of our hackers (Thijs Alkemade) found a critical vulnerability in StartCom’s new StartEncrypt tool, that allows an attacker to gain valid SSL certificates for domains he does not control. While there are some restrictions on what domains the attack can be applied to, domains where the attack will work include google.com, facebook.com, live.com, dropbox.com and others.

  • Unikernels Will Create More Security Problems Than They Solve

    Unikernels, the most recent overhyped technology in search of a problem to solve, have a number of claimed attributes that make them a “better choice.” One most often claimed is that they are “more secure.” This is the first in a series of articles bringing some light to the reality of unikernels so that you can think about them properly, employ them for what they are good for, and avoid the hype.

  • The Python security response team

    As the final presentation of the 2016 Python Language Summit—though it was followed by a few lightning talks that we are not covering—Christian Heimes led a discussion on the Python security response team. There have been some problems along the way that generally boil down to a need for more people working on the team.

Security Leftovers

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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security

Debian Pushes Major Kernel Update to Debian Jessie, Fixes Over 20 Security Flaws

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Security
Debian

Today, June 28, 2016, Debian Project, through Salvatore Bonaccorso, published details about a major Linux kernel security update for the Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system.

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Chrome vulnerability lets attackers steal movies from streaming services

    A significant security vulnerability in Google technology that is supposed to protect videos streamed via Google Chrome has been discovered by researchers from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC) in collaboration with a security researcher from Telekom Innovation Laboratories in Berlin, Germany.

  • Large botnet of CCTV devices knock the snot out of jewelry website

    Researchers have encountered a denial-of-service botnet that's made up of more than 25,000 Internet-connected closed circuit TV devices.

    The researchers with Security firm Sucuri came across the malicious network while defending a small brick-and-mortar jewelry shop against a distributed denial-of-service attack. The unnamed site was choking on an assault that delivered almost 35,000 HTTP requests per second, making it unreachable to legitimate users. When Sucuri used a network addressing and routing system known as Anycast to neutralize the attack, the assailants increased the number of HTTP requests to 50,000 per second.

  • Study finds Password Misuse in Hospitals a Steaming Hot Mess

    Hospitals are pretty hygienic places – except when it comes to passwords, it seems.

    That’s the conclusion of a recent study by researchers at Dartmouth College, the University of Pennsylvania and USC, which found that efforts to circumvent password protections are “endemic” in healthcare environments and mostly go unnoticed by hospital IT staff.

    The report describes what can only be described as wholesale abandonment of security best practices at hospitals and other clinical environments – with the bad behavior being driven by necessity rather than malice.

  • Why are hackers increasingly targeting the healthcare industry?

    Cyber-attacks in the healthcare environment are on the rise, with recent research suggesting that critical healthcare systems could be vulnerable to attack.

    In general, the healthcare industry is proving lucrative for cybercriminals because medical data can be used in multiple ways, for example fraud or identify theft. This personal data often contains information regarding a patient’s medical history, which could be used in targeted spear-phishing attacks.

  • Making the internet more secure
  • Beyond Monocultures
  • Dodging Raindrops Escaping the Public Cloud

Security Leftovers

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Security

Canonical Patches Seven Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities in Ubuntu 16.04, Update Now

Filed under
Linux
Security
Ubuntu

Today, June 27, 2016, Canonical published a new security notice to inform users of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system about the availability of an important kernel update.

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openSUSE Leap 42.2 Now Merged with SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

The development cycle of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system continues, and today we would like to inform our readers about the availability of the third and last Alpha build in the series. Read more

Linux 4.7 and Linux 4.8

  • Linux Kernel 4.7 Officially Released, Introduces Support for Radeon RX480 GPUs
    Today, July 24, 2016, after a week of holiday fun, Linus Torvalds has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7 for all GNU/Linux operating systems. The Linux 4.7 kernel has been in development for the past two months, but that shouldn't surprise anyone who is either reading our website on a regular basis or keeping pace with the Linux kernel development cycle, which was very normal for this branch. A total of seven Release Candidate (RC) testing builds were released since May 29, 2016, which introduced numerous new features and improvements.
  • The Biggest Features Of The Linux 4.7 Kernel
    If all goes according to plan, the Linux 4.7 kernel will be released before the day is through.
  • The Size Of Different DRM Graphics Drivers In Linux 4.7
    Last October I looked at The Size Of The Different Open-Source Linux DRM/Mesa Graphics Drivers, but with it being nearly one year since then and Linux 4.7 due out today, I decided to run some fresh L.O.C. measurements on the popular DRM/KMS drivers to see their current sizes. This lines-of-code counting was mostly done out of a curiosity factor. In this article I'm just looking at the in-kernel DRM code and not the Mesa drivers, DDX drivers, LLVM back-ends, or anything else in user-space related to the open-source graphics drivers.
  • The Btrfs Windows Driver Updated With RAID Support & Other Features
  • Hardened Usercopy Appears Ready To Be Merged For Linux 4.8
    Yet another Linux kernel security feature coming to the mainline kernel that appears readied for the Linux 4.8 merge window is hardened usercopy. Hardened usercopy was originally based upon GrSecurity's PAX_USERCOPY feature but reworked into a whole new form, according to developer Kees Cook at Google. This hardened usercopy is to be exposed as the CONFIG_HARDENED_USERCOPY option within the kernel.

Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS Fixes the Raspberry Pi Partition Resizer, Adds MATE 1.14

As part of the Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) announcement, Martin Wimpress informs us about the release of the Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS operating systems for users of Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS. Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS is not a major release, and if your Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) installation is up to date, you already have the latest software updates and security patches that have been injected in the new installation mediums generated mainly for those who want to reinstall or deploy the OS on new systems. Read more

elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" Gets New Beta with over 70 Bugfixes, RC1 Coming Next

The guys over elementary OS have released a second Beta version of the highly anticipated elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" operating system, fixing numerous of the issues reported by users since the first Beta. This time, the announcement was made by Daniel 'DanRabbit' Foré, who reports that more than 70 bugs reported by public beta testers since last month's Beta release have been squashed, and that many of the fixes are in fact configuration changes, which means that they won't be available to those running the first Beta build, so they'll have to make a fresh install. Read more