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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Google Pixel Phone Hacked in 60 Seconds at PwnFest 2016

    The brand new Android smartphone launched by Google just a few months back has been hacked by Chinese hackers just in less than a minute.

    Yes, the Google's latest Pixel smartphone has been hacked by a team white-hat hackers from Qihoo 360, besides at the 2016 PwnFest hacking competition in Seoul.

  • Too Big to Fail Open-Source Software Needs Hacker Help

    The internet runs on free and open-source code. LAMP is shorthand for the basic stack of applications that makes the internet work. It stands for: Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP. Together, those four pieces of software provide the foundation that lets us share both important data and elaborately filtered selfies all over the world. They are also all free and open-source projects, maintained by core teams of developers. These workers are the saints of the information age.

    Open-source has a tendency to be more stable than proprietary code, thanks in no small part to what’s called Linus’s Law: “given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow.” Because open-source projects invite anyone to contribute, the idea is that lots of developers and testers will find and fix all the problems. It’s worked well so far, but it’s a theory that gets a bit creakier with age, as we’ve begun to see.

  • Heimdall Open-Source PHP Ransomware Targets Web Servers
  • Infect to Protect

    I’m not one to jump on each and every bandwagon I see. Sometimes that’s a good decision, sometimes it’s better to just wait and see where they go before taking any action.

    Containers are one of those ideas that, while promising and intriguing, were quite clumsy in the beginning, so I ignored them for a good while. It’s sufficiently mature now; so much so that’s quite difficult to ignore them. Time to investigate them again.

    [...]

    While the prototype I built isn’t practical and is of very limited use, I find the idea of sandboxed programs without the need for specialized runtimes very enticing.

    Programs can be still packaged the way they have been packaged in the past decades, without throwing away some of the sandboxing benefits that containers provide, all the while not introducing new concepts for users.

    Of course, something like this – even if properly implemented – won’t be a replacement for containers. Specially if one considers their role as packets ready for deployment, which have a lot of value for devops personnel.

    The code, as usual, is open source, and available from this Git repository.

Security Leftovers

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Security

Canonical Patches Multiple Kernel Vulnerabilities in All Supported Ubuntu OSes

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Security

Today, November 11, 2016, Canonical published several security advisories to inform users of the Ubuntu Linux operating system about new kernel updates that patch multiple vulnerabilities discovered lately.

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The Future of IoT: Containers Aim to Solve Security Crisis

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Security

Despite growing security threats, the Internet of Things hype shows no sign of abating. Feeling the FoMo, companies are busily rearranging their roadmaps for IoT. The transition to IoT runs even deeper and broader than the mobile revolution. Everything gets swallowed in the IoT maw, including smartphones, which are often our windows on the IoT world, and sometimes our hubs or sensor endpoints.

New IoT focused processors and embedded boards continue to reshape the tech landscape. Since our Linux and Open Source Hardware for IoT story in September, we’ve seen Intel Atom E3900 “Apollo Lake” SoCs aimed at IoT gateways, as well as new Samsung Artik modules, including a Linux-driven, 64-bit Artik7 COM for gateways and an RTOS-ready, Cortex-M4 Artik0. ARM announced Cortex-M23 and Cortex-M33 cores for IoT endpoints featuring ARMv8-M and TrustZone security.

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Security Leftovers

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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • IoTSeeker Scanner Finds Smart Devices With Dumb Credentials

    The IoTSeeker tool from Rapid7 is designed to comb through users’ networks and identify common IoT devices with default usernames and passwords enabled. Those are the devices upon which botnets such as Mirai feed, especially those with telnet exposed on default ports. Mirai searches for devices with telnet enabled and using default credentials and then compromises them and begins scanning again.

  • DDoS Attack and Resiliency Measures

    Recently DDoS has come into the news because of recent attack (by IoT devices) on Twitter. Although DDoS is not a new kind of attack, because of the advent of IoT, the "smart" devices are new victims for web-based attacks, and as per the predictions it is more likely to grow. What makes this situation even more perilous is the rapid growth of IoT devices out there on the market. As per the estimate, there would be around 50 billion connected devices by the year 2020.

    The DDoS attacks cannot be mitigated completely but by taking some measures the effect can be minimized. This is the theme of this article. Let’s first understand...

  • Donald Trump's campaign website 'hacked' by little poop emoji

    For a few hours the banner of Donald Trump's website contained a familar face. The poop emoji.

    Perhaps foreshadowing the state in which we're in, the little character appeared in the banner of donaldjtrump.com on Tuesday afternoon.

    This was a bug rather than a hack, and it allowed users to write in whatever they wished by adding it into the URL.

New Tor "The Onion Router" Anonymity Network Stable Branch Getting Closer

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Security

Nick Mathewson from the Tor Project announced on the 8th of November 2016, the release of yet another Alpha development snapshot towards the major Tor 0.2.9 "The Onion Router" release.

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Security News

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Security
  • Security, Cyber, and Elections (part 1)

    The US election cycle has been quite heavily dominated by cyber security issues. A number of cyber security experts have even stepped forward to offer their solutions to how to keep safe. Everyone has problems with their proposals, that fundamentally they all stem from not understanding the actual threat.

    Achieving security is possible using counterintelligence principles, but it requires knowing what you want to protect, who you want to protect it from, and then implementing that plan. I expect this post to be deeply unpopular with everyone, but I’ll explain my position anyway.

  • DDoS attack halts heating in Finland amidst winter

    A Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack halted heating distribution at least in two properties in the city of Lappeenranta, located in eastern finland. In both of the events the attacks disabled the computers that were controlling heating in the buildings.

    Both of the buildings where managed by Valtia. The company who is in charge of managing the buildings overall operation and maintenance. According to Valtia CEO, Simo Rounela, in both cases the systems that controlled the central heating and warm water circulation were temporarily disabled.

    In the city of Lappeenranta, there were at least two buildings whose systems were knocked down by the network attack. In a DDoS attack the network is overloaded by traffic from multiple locations with the aim of causing the system to fail.

  • Communications watchdog: Criminals behind home automation system cyber attack

    The Finnish communications regulator Ficora said it suspects criminal entities of coordinating a web attack that disrupted home automation systems in the southeastern city of Lappeenranta. However the agency said that the real target of the attack may not have been in Finland.

    "According to our information, the systems in question are not the intended targets in this case, but they were compromised in a cyber attack that focused on European entities. In other words, it seems that there was some criminal group behind it," said Jarkko Saarimäki, head of Ficora’s cyber security centre.

    Officials said that the event bore the hallmark of a denial of service (DoS) strike, which floods a service which so much web traffic that it is unable to provide services normally.

  • Researchers hack Philips Hue smart bulbs from the sky

    Security researchers in Canada and Israel have discovered a way to take over the Internet of Things (IoT) from the sky.

    Okay, that’s a little dramatic, but the researchers were able to take control of some Philips Hue lights using a drone. Based on an exploit for the ZigBee Light Link Touchlink system, white hat hackers were able to remotely control the Hue lights via drone and cause them to blink S-O-S in Morse code.

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • Reproducible Builds: week 80 in Stretch cycle

    Patches to GCC to generate reproducible output independently of the build-path were submitted by Ximin Luo.

  • Security considerations with github continuous integration

    Continuous integration (CI) support in github is a very useful addition. Not only can you utilize existing services like Travis CI, you can utilize the github API and roll your own, which is exactly what we did for libStorageMgmt. LibStorageMgmt needs to run tests for hardware specific plugins, so we created our own tooling to hook up github and our hardware which is geographically located across the US. However, shortly after getting all this in place and working it became pretty obvious that we provided a nice attack vector…

  • The perfect cybercrime: selling fake followers to fake people

    Hackers are recruiting the internet of things into a botnet. But this time they’re not trying to take down the internet. They’re just using them to make fake social media accounts – which they can then sell to online narcissists to make an easy buck.

    Masarah-Cynthia Paquet-Clouston, a criminologist with the University of Montreal, and Olivier Bilodeau, a cybersecurity researcher at Montreal-based company GoSecure, have uncovered a large botnet that recruits everyday devices such as connected toasters, fridges or even your grandmother’s router to help commit social media fraud. They think that this stealthy, lucrative scheme is a glimpse into the future of low-level cybercrime.

  • Yet Another E-voting Machine Vulnerability Found

    We've been talking about the ridiculousness of e-voting machines for well over a decade. If a machine doesn't include a paper trail for backup, it's suspect. That's been the case since e-voting machines have been on the market, and many of us have been pointing this out all along. And the big e-voting companies have a long history of not really caring, even as their machines are shown to be vulnerable in a variety of ways. So it come as little to no surprise to find out that security firm Cylance has announced that it's found yet another set of e-voting vulnerabilities in the Sequoia AVC Edge Mk1 voting machine. Sequoia especially has a long history of buggy, faulty machines.

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 and 8.10 Get Linux Kernel 4.4.30 LTS, New Security Updates

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GNU
Linux
Security

Users of the Debian-based Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" and Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" distributions are in for a treat this weekend, as a new kernel update and latest Debian Stable security updates landed in the software repositories.

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Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.23 Snap Creator for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and 16.10

Canonical's Snappy development team have released a new maintenance version of the Snapcraft 2.x tool that lets applications developers package their apps as Snap packages for Ubuntu and other GNU/Linux distributions that support Snaps. Read more

Mandriva Fork Mageia 5.1 Lets Users Install the Linux OS on NVMe-Based Drives

The development team behind the Mandriva fork Mageia Linux distribution are announcing the release and general availability of the first, and probably the last, point release of the Mageia 5 series. Read more

Linux 4.9-rc8

So if anybody has been following the git tree, it should come as no surprise that I ended up doing an rc8 after all: things haven't been bad, but it also hasn't been the complete quiet that would have made me go "no point in doing another week". Extra kudos to Arnd, who actually root-caused the incredibly annoying "modversions do not work with new versions of binutils", bisecting it to a particular change to symbol handling in binutils, and then adding a small one-liner patch to the kernel to work around the issue. We already had other workarounds in place, but it's always good to know exactly what in the tool chain changed to cause things like this. Read more Also: Linux Kernel 4.9 Slated for December 11 Release as Linus Torvalds Outs RC8 Linux 4.9-rc8 Kernel Released