Security

ID theft, vulnerabilities, privacy issues, etc

FileZilla, Other Open-Source Software From 'Right' Sources Is Safe

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OSS
Security

A basic tenant of open-source software security has long been the idea that since the code is open, anyone can look inside to see if there is something that shouldn't be there.

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IBM Shows That Collaborations With the NSA Are a Company’s Death Knell

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Security

At this stage, despite deceiving marketing, IBM needs GNU/Linux and Free software more than GNU/Linux and FOSS need IBM. Recently, the President of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) called IBM a patent troll. IBM can carry on openwashing its business with OpenStack [11,12], Hadoop [13] and so on (even OpenOffice.org), but until it stops serving the NSA, the software patents agenda and various other conflicting interests (causes that harm software freedom and GNU/Linux) we are better off nurturing “true” (as in completely) Free software companies.

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If Microsoft thinks old Tor clients are risky, why not Windows XP?

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Microsoft
OSS
Security

Earlier this week, Microsoft revealed that it had been going into users computers and removing outdated Tor clients. At first glance, this might seem like a crazed, misplaced attack on the Tor network, not unlike a campaign by a certain Irish politician, but the issue runs deeper than first thought.

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For Real Security, Use CentOS — Never RHEL — and Run Neither on Amazon’s Servers

Filed under
Linux
Security

Never run Red Hat’s “Enterprise Linux”, which cannot be trusted because of NSA involvement; Amazon, which pays Microsoft for RHEL and works with the CIA, should never be used for hosting

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Renowned cryptographer believes his 'Blackphone' can stop the NSA

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Security

Revelations about how insecure our communications are have been a daily fixture of the news cycle recently, and it's in this climate that a pair of companies are combining to launch a new smartphone focused on privacy. The Blackphone will run a "security-oriented" version of Android named PrivatOS, which the companies say will allow users to securely place and receive phone calls, text messages, video chat, transfer and store files, and "anonymize your activity" through a VPN.

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No hypervisor vulnerability exploited in OpenSSL site breach

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Security

The OpenSSL Project confirmed that weak passwords used on the hosting infrastructure led to the compromise of its website, dispelling concerns...

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All Linux Distributions Store Wi-Fi Passwords in Plain Text If You Don’t Use Encryption

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Linux
Security

My colleague, Silviu Stahie, wrote an interesting article earlier today, regarding the “ability” of the Ubuntu Linux operating system to store Wi-Fi passwords in plain text, “thanks” to the default design of the NetworkManager application, initially developed by Red Hat.

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Reminder to Corporate Press: PHP is Not Linux

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Linux
Security

Somehow a PHP issue gets described as a "Linux worm" (usually in headlines, too) for many other writers to repeat without researching any further. If there is any issue associated with embedded devices (which cannot be patched easily, if at all), then don't blame Linux; embedded systems just happen to be an area reined by Linux and GNU. Windows would not have coped any better.

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NSA Shows Why We Should Abandon All Proprietary Software and Verify Trust

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Security

If Europe is serious about cyber security, then it should dump all proprietary software (back doors-friendly software) as soon as possible. Given everything we now know about the NSA, ignorance and uncertainty are no longer an excuse. A Dutch source has just revealed that the NSA cracked 50,000 computer networks. The evidence is overwhelming

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Is open source encryption the answer to NSA snooping?

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Security

The NSA had cracked Internet encryption.

The NSA was listening in to everything.

European customers were especially concerned, he says.

Fortunately, many of the headlines had been unnecessarily alarmist.

“The earlier types of encryption, with 64 bits or less, the NSA has figured out how to brute force decrypt at least some of that traffic,” he says. “But the more modern, strong encryption, with 128 or 256 encryption units, they can't decrypt that. And it bothers them no end.”

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Symantec Reveals that Cybercriminals Employ New Linux Trojan to Embezzle Data

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Linux
Security

Security researchers of well-known security firm 'Symantec' have identified a cyber-criminal operation which relies on a new-fangled Linux backdoor, nicknamed Linux.Fokirtor, to embezzle data without being discovered.

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Hacked by the NSA

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Security

There is little doubt that the NSA’s activities will have a negative effect on the U.S. tech sector. Some countries are already considering mandating that business servers be located in-country in an attempt to thwart intrusions by the agency. The Swiss are taking a further step and have hopes of profiting from their strong privacy laws with “Swiss Cloud,” a cloud service being developed with security in mind by Swisscom, in which the Swiss government has a majority stake.

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Linux in Government and Why There is Still NSA Agenda to Keep Wary Eye on

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Security

Even as Linux advocates we should recognise that there is a diversity of interests and the agenda of the NSA is to spy on everything and everyone, not to protect our privacy and security.

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Mozilla's web security guru talks open source

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Security

Mozilla is about more than just web browsers

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Trusting Trust and Trusting Red Hat et al.

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Security

With all sorts of National Security Letters, gag orders, oppressive laws like PARTIOT Act etc. we just know that those based in the US can be forced to facilitate surveillance (without ever speaking about it publicly).

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Report: NSA has little success cracking Tor

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Security

computerworld.com: The agency has attacked other software, including Firefox, in order to compromise the anonymity tool, according to documents

Linux is more secure but not invulnerable

Filed under
Linux
Security

techrepublic.com: Jack Wallen believes Linux is more secure than other platforms, but it's only as secure as the packages installed.

Linux “HoT” bank Trojan: Failed malware

Filed under
Security
  • Linux “HoT” bank Trojan: Failed malware
  • Shuttleworth: Prism Will Drive Cloud to ‘Other Jurisdictions’
  • NSA 'altered random-number generator'
  • Federal Courts Still Scaremongering About Spooky "Open Source" Software
  • ‘Hand-of-Thief’ Undergoing Construction to Become Commercially Viable
  • Is OpenSSL's Cryptography Broken?
  • How to create an encrypted zip file on Linux
  • Really basic intro to encrypted filesystems in openSUSE
  • What You Need to Know About Encryption on The Internet
  • Open Source Security
  • Semplice Linux 5 Will Protect You from NSA
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