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Security

IPFire 2.19 Core Update 101 Patches Cross-Site-Scripting Vulnerability in Web UI

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Security

The development team behind the IPFire software have announced the general availability of the Core Update 101 of the IPFire 2.19 Linux kernel-based firewall distribution.

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Security Leftovers

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Security

IPFire 2.19 - Core Update 101 released

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GNU
Linux
Security

This is the official release announcement for IPFire 2.19 – Core Update 101. This update contains various security fixes and bug fixes.

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Git 2.8.2 Popular Source Code Management System Released with Over 18 Bug Fixes

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Security

The stable 2.8 series of the popular Git source code management system just received its second point release, version 2.8.2, bringing over 18 improvements and bug fixes.

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • 66% of USB Flash Drives infected – don’t trust a stray [Ed: Windows]

    The problem is that the OS will automatically run a program that can install malware from a USB stick.

  • Dental Assn Mails Malware to Members

    The domain is used by crooks to infect visitors with malware that lets the attackers gain full control of the infected Windows computer.

  • Slack bot token leakage exposing business critical information

    Developers are leaking access tokens for Slack widely on GitHub, in public repositories, support tickets and public gists. They are extremely easy to find due to their structure. It is clear that the knowledge about what these tokens can be used for with malicious intent is not on top of people’s minds…yet. The Detectify team shows the impact, with examples, and explains how this could be prevented.

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Friday's security updates
  • Hacking Slack accounts: As easy as searching GitHub

    A surprisingly large number of developers are posting their Slack login credentials to GitHub and other public websites, a practice that in many cases allows anyone to surreptitiously eavesdrop on their conversations and download proprietary data exchanged over the chat service.

    According to a blog post published Thursday, company researchers recently estimated that about 1,500 access tokens were publicly available, some belonging to people who worked for Fortune 500 companies, payment providers, Internet service providers, and health care providers. The researchers privately reported their findings to Slack, and the chat service said it regularly monitors public sites for posts that publish the sensitive tokens.

  • Time for a patch: six vulns fixed in NTP daemon
  • NTP Daemon Gets Fixes for Vulnerabilities Causing DoS and Authentication Bypass
  • Cisco Spots New NTP Bugs
  • Network Time Keeps on Ticking with Long-Running NTP Project [Ed: corrected URL]
  • Open Source Milagro Project Aims to Fix Web Security for Cloud, Mobile, IoT

    As the Internet continues to both grow in size and widen in scope, so do demands on the supporting infrastructure. The number of users and devices, amount of activity, internationalization of the web, and new devices that range from mobile apps and cloud instances to "Internet of Things," put strain on the system. Not just for bandwidth or service availability, but also on the assurance of trust -- trust that the entities at each end are who (or what) they say they are, and that their communications are private and secure.

  • M2Mi Obtains DHS Open-Source Cryptographic Tool Development Funds

    Machine-to-Machine Intelligence Corp. has been awarded $75,000 in funds by the Department of Homeland Security‘s science and technology directorate to create a deployable cryptographic protocol for an Internet of Things security initiative.

  • Encrypted Network Traffic Comes at a Cost

    The use of encryption over the Internet is growing. Fueled by Edward Snowden's revelations on the extent of NSA and GCHQ content monitoring, encryption is now increasingly provided by the big tech companies as part of their standard product offerings. It's effectiveness can be seen in the continuing demands by different governments for these same tech companies to provide government backdoors for that encryption. Encryption works: it safeguards privacy.

    Against this background, the use of Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or Transport Layer Security (TLS) to encrypt network traffic is likely to grow dramatically. Google is encouraging this. It already uses HTTPS as a positive weight for web sites in its search algorithm, while current rumors suggest it will soon start to place a warning red X in the URL bar of sites that do not use it. Taken together, these are strong incentives for businesses that don't currently use SSL/TLS to start doing so. Some predictions believe that almost 70% of network traffic will be encrypted by the end of this year.

  • Raptor Engineering Updates Details On Their POWER8-Based Talos Secure Workstation

    Raptor Engineering has published new information around their proposed high-performance Talos Secure Workstation that for around $3k is a high-end POWER8 motherboard.

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • The road to hell is paved with SAML Assertions

    A vulnerability in Microsoft Office 365 SAML Service Provider implementation allowed for cross domain authentication bypass affecting all federated domains. An attacker exploiting this vulnerability could gain unrestricted access to a victim's Office 365 account, including access to their email, files stored in OneDrive etc.

  • Cisco Finds Backdoor Installed on 12 Million PCs

    Cisco started analyzing Tuto4PC’s OneSoftPerDay application after its systems detected an increase in “Generic Trojans” (i.e. threats not associate with any known family). An investigation uncovered roughly 7,000 unique samples with names containing the string “Wizz,” including “Wizzupdater.exe,” “Wizzremote.exe” and “WizzInstaller.exe.” The string also showed up in some of the domains the samples had been communicating with.

  • The "Wizzards" of Adware [Ed: unsurprisingly Windows]
  • All About Fraud: How Crooks Get the CVV

    A longtime reader recently asked: “How do online fraudsters get the 3-digit card verification value (CVV or CVV2) code printed on the back of customer cards if merchants are forbidden from storing this information? The answer: If not via phishing, probably by installing a Web-based keylogger at an online merchant so that all data that customers submit to the site is copied and sent to the attacker’s server.

  • Why We Should Be Worried About Ancient Viruses Infecting Power Plants [Ed: unsurprisingly Windows again]

    The reasons these patients are vulnerable to viruses like W32.Ramnit and Conficker is because they run legacy systems that haven’t been patched or updated for a decade. And that’s fine as long as the operators of the plant keep them isolated and assume they are insecure, hopefully keeping the more critical parts of the network away safer.

  • Magical Thinking in Internet Security

    Increased complexity without corresponding increases in understanding would be a net loss to a buyer. At scale, it's been a net loss to the world economy.

  • Edward Snowden: The Internet Is Broken

    In 2013, a now-infamous government contractor named Edward Snowden shined a stark light on our vulnerable communications infrastructure by leaking 10,000 classified U.S. documents to the world.

    One by one, they detailed a mass surveillance program in which the National Security Administration and others gathered information on citizens — via phone tracking and tapping undersea Internet cables.

    Three years after igniting a controversy over personal privacy, public security, and online rights that he is still very much a part of, Snowden spoke with Popular Science in December 2015 and shared his thoughts on what's still wrong and how to fix it.

Security Leftovers

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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • German nuclear plant infected with computer viruses, operator says

    A nuclear power plant in Germany has been found to be infected with computer viruses, but they appear not to have posed a threat to the facility's operations because it is isolated from the Internet, the station's operator said on Tuesday.

    The Gundremmingen plant, located about 120 km (75 miles) northwest of Munich, is run by the German utility RWE (RWEG.DE).

    The viruses, which include "W32.Ramnit" and "Conficker", were discovered at Gundremmingen's B unit in a computer system retrofitted in 2008 with data visualization software associated with equipment for moving nuclear fuel rods, RWE said.

    Malware was also found on 18 removable data drives, mainly USB sticks, in office computers maintained separately from the plant's operating systems. RWE said it had increased cyber-security measures as a result.

  • Death of the enterprise VPN - if remote access is not secure what comes next? [iophk: "Spam. Besides, if an app cannot be put on the net without a VPN then it does not belong on the net in the first place."]

    VPNs are the backbone of enterprise remote access and yet their security limitations are starting to pile up. The problem is that the very thing that once made them so useful, network access, is now their biggest weakness. As the 2014 attacks on retailers Target and Home Depot painfully illustrate, this architecture can easily be exploited by attackers armed with stolen credentials to move around networks from within in ways that are difficult to spot until it’s too late.

GNOME Software Bug Doesn't Let Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Users Install Third-Party Debs

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GNOME
Security
Ubuntu

We've been tipped earlier by one of our readers that there's a bug in the GNOME Software (Ubuntu Software) package manager which doesn't let users install third-party .deb files in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

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Android Leftovers

Arduino-Compatible RISC-V and More

  • HiFive1 Is an Open-Source, Arduino-Compatible RISC-V Dev Kit
    Bay Area startup SiFive has announced the Freedom Everywhere 310 (FE310) system-on-chip — the industry’s first commercially-available SoC based on the free, open-source RISC-V architecture, along with the corresponding low-cost, Arduino-compatible HiFive1 development kit.
  • Samsung Defection From ARM to RISC-V.
    It was always thought that, when ARM relinquished its independence, its customers would look around for other alternatives. The nice thing about RISC-V is that it’s independent, open source and royalty-free. And RISC-V is what Samsung is reported to be using for an IoT CPU in preference to ARM.
  • Neutralize ME firmware on SandyBridge and IvyBridge platforms
    First introduced in Intel’s 965 Express Chipset Family, the Intel Management Engine (ME) is a separate computing environment physically located in the (G)MCH chip (for Core 2 family CPUs which is separate from the northbridge), or PCH chip replacing ICH(for Core i3/i5/i7 which is integrated with northbridge).

Moving From Microsoft to GNU/Linux

  • Is Linux the Right Choice for My Business?
    In these hard-economic times, cutting expense is among the keys to the success of a business. Licensing costs can be a huge drain on the wallet of any service. Of course, Microsoft Windows servers are still the standard in a lot of offices, however, there is an unsung hero out there simply waiting to be discovered by more business-owners. This article is obviously describing Linux. While it does have some appeal in both the general public and economic sectors, it is widely used for servers and still not a really popular operating system for workstations but among geeks. Why? You might ask. Microsoft has the marketplace cornered and remains the norm simply by being the standard. This is not to state that Microsoft does not produce quality software application; this post indicates absolutely nothing of the sort. Microsoft got where they are today by their sweat and devoted developers, in no way is this article lessening the quality of Microsoft or their line of products.
  • Moving with SQL Server to Linux? Move from SQL Server to MySQL as well! [Ed: SQL Server DOES NOT (!) run on Linux]
    Over the recent years, there has been a large number of individuals as well as organizations who are ditching the Windows platform for Linux platform, and this number will continue to grow as more developments in Linux are experienced. Linux has for long been the leader in Web servers as most of the web servers run on Linux, and this could be one of the reasons why the high migration is being experienced.
  • Does Linux community trust Microsoft?
    Does actually Linux community like Microsoft? Does actually Linux community trust Microsoft? I cannot answer the first question for sure, but I have a sure answer for the second question.

Mozilla Reports 2015 Revenue of $421.3M

For its fiscal 2015 year, Mozilla reported revenue of $421.3 million, up from $329.6 million that it reported Mozilla's revenue's have grown significantly over the last decade. The first year that Mozilla ever publicly disclosed its financial status was for its 2005 fiscal year, when the open-source organization generated $52.9 million in revenue. Read more Finance/ial issues: Open source wearable Angel shuts down