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Security

Bringing new security features to Docker

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
Security

In the first of this series on Docker security, I wrote "containers do not contain." In this second article, I'll cover why and what we're doing about it.

Docker, Red Hat, and the open source community are working together to make Docker more secure. When I look at security containers, I am looking to protect the host from the processes within the container, and I'm also looking to protect containers from each other. With Docker we are using the layered security approach, which is "the practice of combining multiple mitigating security controls to protect resources and data."

Basically, we want to put in as many security barriers as possible to prevent a break out. If a privileged process can break out of one containment mechanism, we want to block them with the next. With Docker, we want to take advantage of as many security mechanisms of Linux as possible.

Luckily, with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7, we get a plethora of security features.

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Open source needs more than the Open Crypto Audit Project

Filed under
OSS
Security

But open source tends to be something of an agglomeration of programmers -- some brilliant, some boneheaded -- around a core developer or two. I think it just might be possible to influence the small group of programmers at the core of each open source project to create a culture that develops secure code. In fact, in some ways it might even be easier to do with open source projects because they, for the most part, don't face the arbitrary deadlines of the commercial world.

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Open source software security: Who can you trust?

Filed under
OSS
Security

Fears of backdoors and heightened concerns about encryption software are running rampant.

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Red Hat: Open source "more secure" than proprietary

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Open source technologies are "more secure" than software that is developed in a proprietary way, Red Hat's JBoss middleware business unit general manager, Mike Piech, said in a meeting with journalists.

On the one hand, open source software code is freely available, which means that hackers will see how to hack it. But, on the other, there is also a vast community of people working to maintain open source software security.

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Tails 1.1.1 is out

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Debian

The next Tails release is scheduled for October 14.

Have a look to our roadmap to see where we are heading to.

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Healthdirect Australia sees value in open source for security solution

Filed under
OSS
Security

Commonwealth and state/territory government funded public company, Healthdirect Australia, has used open source software to build an identity and access management (IAM) solution.

The IAM solution allows users to have one identity across all of its websites and applications. For example, users can sign in using their Facebook, LinkedIn or Gmail account.

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Kali Tools Website Launched, 1.0.9 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Now that we have caught our breath after the Black Hat and DEF CON conferences, we have put aside some time to fix an annoying bug in our 1.0.8 ISO releases related to outdated firmware as well as regenerate fresh new ARM and VMware images (courtesy of Offensive Security) for our new 1.0.9 release.

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Is Open Source an Open Invitation to Hack Webmail Encryption?

Filed under
OSS
Security

While the open source approach to software development has proven its value over and over again, the idea of opening up the code for security features to anyone with eyeballs still creates anxiety in some circles. Such worries are ill-founded, though.

One concern about opening up security code to anyone is that anyone will include the NSA, which has a habit of discovering vulnerabilities and sitting on them so it can exploit them at a later time. Such discoveries shouldn't be a cause of concern, argued Phil Zimmermann, creator of PGP, the encryption scheme Yahoo and Google will be using for their webmail.

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Open source software: The question of security

Filed under
OSS
Security

The logic is understandable - how can a software with source code that can easily be viewed, accessed and changed have even a modicum of security?

opensource-security-question
Open source software is safer than many believe.
But with organizations around the globe deploying open source solutions in even some of the most mission-critical and security-sensitive environments, there is clearly something unaccounted for by that logic. According to a November 28 2013 Financial News article, some of the world's largest banks and exchanges, including Deutsche Bank and the New York Stock Exchange, have been active in open source projects and are operating their infrastructure on Linux, Apache and similar systems.

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GNU hackers discover HACIENDA government surveillance and give us a way to fight back

Filed under
GNU
Security

GNU community members and collaborators have discovered threatening details about a five-country government surveillance program codenamed HACIENDA. The good news? Those same hackers have already worked out a free software countermeasure to thwart the program.

According to Heise newspaper, the intelligence agencies of the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand, have used HACIENDA to map every server in twenty-seven countries, employing a technique known as port scanning. The agencies have shared this map and use it to plan intrusions into the servers. Disturbingly, the HACIENDA system actually hijacks civilian computers to do some of its dirty work, allowing it to leach computing resources and cover its tracks.

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More in Tux Machines

European Greens RFC: ‘Transparency implies use of open source’

The Greens/European Free Alliance in the European Parliament want to find out for once and for all if the use of free and open source software is essential for the democratic institution. The political group is asking for comments on a study linking the use of free software to the European Parliament’s principles of openness and right to information. Read more

Top 3 open source alternatives to Google Analytics

Let’s start off by taking a look at the open source application that rivals Google Analytics for functions: Piwik. Piwik does most of what Google Analytics does, and chances are it packs the features that you need. Those features include metrics on the number of visitors hitting your site, data on where they come from (both on the web and geographically), from what pages they leave your site, and the ability to track search engine referrals. Piwik also has a number of reports and you can customize the dashboard to view the metrics that you want to see. To make your life easier, Piwik integrates with over 65 content management, ecommerce, and online forum systems like WordPress, Magneto, Joomla!, and vBulletin using plugins. With anything else, you just need to add a tracking code to a page on your site. Read more

AN EARLY VIEW OF GTK+ 3.16

We’ve had long-standing feature requests to turn scrollbars into overlayed indicators, for touch systems. An implementation of this idea has been merged now. We show traditional scrollbars when a mouse is detected, otherwise we fade in narrow, translucent indicators. The indicators are rendered on top of the content and don’t take up extra space. When you move the pointer over the indicator, it turns into a full-width scrollbar that can be used as such. Read more