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Security

Is SSH Insecure?

Filed under
OSS
Security

Fact is, we don’t yet know enough details about all possible attack surfaces against SSH available to the agencies and we badly need more information to know what infrastructure components remain save and reliable for our day to day work. However we do have an idea about the weak spots that should be avoided.

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Anonabox Gets Kicked from Kickstarter, Shows Up on Indiegogo with Updated Specs

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

The online community tore the project apart and discovered that the makers of Anonabox were disingenuous when they were saying that it was something original, custom built. As it turned out, it was actually a repurposed Chinese device with a slightly better memory. Also, the operating system used was OpenWRT, which is basically Linux distro for routers and other such devices. Most, if not all of the information provided on Kickstarter was a lie. Eventually, the Kickstarter project was suspended and no one got hurt, financially.

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Shuttleworth Explains Why Open Source is More Secure than Closed Source [VIDEO]

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

In 2014, open source technology came under a heavy barrage of criticism as a result of high-profile security vulnerabilities. Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Ubuntu Linux and its lead commercial sponsor Ubuntu, has a very different view and remains a stalwart defender of the open source model for software development and security.

In a video interview with Datamation, Shuttleworth details his view on open-source security as Ubuntu Linux celebrates its 10th anniversary.

In 2014, the Heartbleed vulnerability in the open source OpenSSL cryptographic library had wide ranging impact. OpenSSL is widely deployed on servers, VPNs and even mobile devices and it took some time for vendors and users to get systems and devices patched.

"We have a big responsibility to proactively make sure that the system is as robust in the face of inevitable flaws as it can be," Shuttleworth said.

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Open Source Privacy Tools NSA Can't Crack: OTR, PGP, RedPhone, Tor And Tails

Filed under
OSS
Security

In a recent talk at the Chaos Communication Congress, Jacob Appelbaum, who is a core member of the Tor Project and is now working with Der Spiegel and Laura Poitras to analyze the Snowden documents, unveiled some documents showing which tools NSA couldn't crack.

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Believe It or Not, Boeing's Super-Secure Android Smartphone Comes With the Best of BlackBerry

Filed under
Android
Security

As it turns out, Boeing might actually be BlackBerry's best friend right now. You see, the ultra-secure Boeing Black handset will come with support for BlackBerry's BES 12 device management service. It's not much of a stretch to assume the Boeing Black might also feature BlackBerry's hallmark secure messaging system.

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Old FOSS Friend & Foe Represents Sony in Hack

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
Legal

Boies, along with three attorneys representing the States, brought Microsoft to it’s knees — or so it seemed at the time.

On November 5, 1999, Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson found that Windows dominance on the PC made the company a monopoly and that the company had taken illegal actions against Apple, Java, Netscape, Lotus Notes, RealNetworks, Linux, and others in order to maintain that monopoly. He ordered Microsoft broken in two, with one company producing Windows and another handling all other Microsoft software.

As we all know, Judge Jackson’s solution was never implemented.

Although an appeals court upheld the verdict against Redmond, the breakup of the company was overturned and sent back to the lower court for a review by a new judge. Two years later, in September, 2001, under the Bush Administration, the DOJ announced that it was no longer seeking the breakup of Microsoft, and in November reached a settlement which California, Connecticut, Iowa, Florida, Kansas, Minnesota, Utah, Virginia and Massachusetts opposed.

The settlement basically required Microsoft to share its APIs and appoint a three person panel that would have complete access to Microsoft’s systems, records, and source code for five years. The settlement didn’t require Microsoft to change any code or stop the company from tying additional software with Windows. Additionally, the DOJ did not require Microsoft to change any of its code.

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You should be running a pfSense firewall

Filed under
Security
BSD

Those of us who work in the depths of high technology are not immune to the age-old adage of the shoemaker’s children having no shoes. We probably have the most technologically advanced homes of anyone we know, but we also tend to leave various items alone if they’re not causing problems. After all, that’s what we deal with at work. Who needs to saddle themselves with network upgrade projects at home when nothing’s broken?

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Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) Gets Linux Kernel Regression Fix

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

A Linux kernel regression for Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) has been identified by Canonical and the developers have issued a patch that should be available through regular channels.

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The Grinch That Tried to Exploit Linux

Filed under
Linux
Security

The Grinch flaw was reported by Stephen Cody, chief security evangelist at Alert Logic. Cody alleges that the Grinch flaw enables users on a local machine to escalate privileges. Leading Linux vendor Red Hat, however, disagrees that the Grinch issue is even a bug and instead notes in a Red Hat knowledge base article that the Grinch report "incorrectly classifies expected behavior as a security issue."

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Git 2.2.1 Released To Fix Critical Security Issue

Filed under
Development
OSS
Security

Today's Git vulnerability affects those using the Git client on case-insensitive file-systems. On case-insensitive platforms like Windows and OS X, committing to .Git/config could overwrite the user's .git/config and could lead to arbitrary code execution. Fortunately with most Phoronix readers out there running Linux, this isn't an issue thanks to case-sensitive file-systems.

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World’s smallest i.MX6 module has onboard WiFi, eMMC

Variscite unveiled a 50 x 20mm “DART-MX6″ module that runs Linux or Android on the Freescale i.MX6, with up to 64GB eMMC flash and -40 to 85°C support. Variscite’s claim that the 50 x 20mm DART-MX6 is the world’s smallest computer-on-module based on Freescale’s i.MX6 system-on-chip appears to be a valid one. It beats the smallest ones we’ve seen to date: TechNexion’s 40 x 36mm PICO-IMX6, and Solid-Run’s 47 x 30mm microSOM i4. It’s also just a hair larger than Variscite’s own 52 x 17mm DART-4460, which is based on a dual-core TI OMAP4460 SoC, and Gumstix’s slightly larger 58 x 17mm Overo modules, which use TI Sitara AM37xx SoCs. Read more