Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Security

TrueCrypt audit finds “no evidence of backdoors” or malicious code

Filed under
Security

Since September 2013, a handful of cryptographers have been discussing new problems and alternatives to the popular security application. By February 2014, the Open Crypto Audit Project—a new organization based in North Carolina that seeks formal 501(c)3 non-profit status—raised around $80,000 towards this goal on various online fundraising sites.

"[The results] don't panic me,” Matthew Green, a Johns Hopkins cryptography professor who has been one of the people leading this effort, told Ars. “I think the code quality is not as high as it should be, but on the other hand, nothing terrible is in there, so that's reassuring”

Read more ►

Former Chief Security Officer for Microsoft the Chairman of the Board of Firm Behind Heartbleed®

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Security

A serious conflict of interests that nobody in the media is talking about; Codenomicon is headed by Microsoft’s Howard A. Schmidt

Read more ►

CyanogenMod reveals new branding that represents openness, security and customization

Filed under
Android
Security

Well, folks, it looks like CyanogenMod, Inc. is starting to shape up to look like a real legit company. The company has already made big deals with phone manufacturers and successfully raised a good deal of money to help in their endeavors, and now they are making some changes to the way they present themselves.

Read more ►

Security Exaggeration, Linux on ATMs, and Mac Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux
Security
Ubuntu

A lot of Websites are still covering the last couple of Linux security breaches and today Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols said, "It's not Linux's fault!" It rarely is. A lot of talk is heard lately about those last XP users and what they will use next, but yesterday ComputerWorld.com said ATMs will likely be migrated to Linux as well. That's a whole demographic we forgot to count. Jack Wallen says Google is "single-handedly" responsible for propelling Linux to the top. And Michael Larabel reports that Ubuntu 14.04 runs very well on MacBooks.

Read more ►

Why the media loves to exaggerate Linux security problems

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

There have been a lot of media reports about Linux security problems recently. ZDNet has taken a stand and pointed out that the problem isn't with Linux, the problem is with certain Linux users and administrators. I'd also argue that the problem is also with certain media outlets who jump on the "linux security stinks!" bandwagon at the earliest opportunity.

Read more ►

Cyber criminals capture 25,000 Unix servers

Filed under
Server
Security

Security boffins at ESET, in collaboration with CERT-Bund, the Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing as well as other agencies, have found a cybercriminal campaign that has taken control of over 25,000 Unix servers worldwide.

Dubbed "Operation Windigo" it has resulted in infected servers sending out millions of spam emails which are designed to hijack servers, infect the computers that visit them, and steal information.

Read more ►

Replicant developers find and close Samsung Galaxy back-door

Filed under
Android
Security

While working on Replicant, a fully free/libre version of Android, we discovered that the proprietary program running on the applications processor in charge of handling the communication protocol with the modem actually implements a back-door that lets the modem perform remote file I/O operations on the file system.

Read more ►

Red Hat Risk Reflex (The Linux Security Flaw That Isn't)

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

News headlines screaming that yet another Microsoft Windows vulnerability has been discovered, is in the wild or has just been patched are two a penny. Such has it ever been. News headlines declaring that a 'major security problem' has been found with Linux are a different kettle of fish. So when reports of an attack that could circumvent verification of X.509 security certificates, and by so doing bypass both secure sockets layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS) website protection, people sat up and took notice. Warnings have appeared that recount how the vulnerability can impact upon Debian, Red Hat and Ubuntu distributions. Red Hat itself issued an advisory warning that "GnuTLS did not correctly handle certain errors that could occur during the verification of an X.509 certificate, causing it to incorrectly report a successful verification... An attacker could use this flaw to create a specially crafted certificate that could be accepted by GnuTLS as valid." In all, at least 200 operating systems actually use GnuTLS when it comes to implementing SSL and TLS and the knock-on effect could mean that web applications and email alike are vulnerable to attack. And it's all Linux's fault. Or is it?

Read more ►

Panic Over Transport Layer Security (TLS) Flaw Which is Already Patched

Filed under
GNU
Security

The only shocking thing is the amount of press coverage this received. PGP/GPG, OpenSSH, OpenSSL etc. were previously named here for flaws that had been found (in the context of Red Hat and the NSA [1, 2, 3]). These are not so uncommon. One just needs to keep up to date (patched) — one that which Apple’s customers cannot do. They can’t even write their own patches.

Read more ►

Yes there was a security hole in Linux, but Red Hat already fixed it

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Security

Originally reported by Ars Technica, the fix was available by the time the general public was made aware of it. It’s actually fairly similar to a certain security hole that lived for a year and could have allowed for exploits to be used in the wild.

Read more ►

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation's certification sets new benchmark for admins

At LinuxCon last week, the Linux Foundation announced a new certification scheme for Linux professionals to complement their existing training activities. The Linux Foundation Certification Program offers a peer-verified certification for both early-career and engineer-level systems administrators for a fee of $300. The process involves a real-time skill test administered via a remote-access virtual machine running one of several Linux distributions. To ensure the rules are followed, a human proctor watches the test via screen-sharing and video camera using your own computer at a location of your choice. The certification tests real-world skills for both sys admins and more senior engineers at the command line and in configuration files. Read more

Linux Mint Debian to Be Called "Betsy"

"The upcoming release of LMDE will be version 2, codename 'betsy' and it will use a Debian 'jessie' package base. The team is currently adapting to the new LMDE, setting up its repositories and porting various packages onto it. The target for a stable release is estimated for this November, along with an official upgrade path from UP8 to Betsy," said the leader of the Linux Mint project, Clement Lefebvre. Read more

Adapting to the Mobile World

Now more than ever companies are gaining a mobile presence due to the popularity of smartphones and tablets. It is important to any company’s success to become part of the mobile world if they want to build business. Consumers used to look up companies in the phonebook, but now the first action consumers take when they need to find a company is to look them up online. If consumers cannot find a company online, they are likely to find a different company instead of continuing the search through other means. Because the Internet is so easily accessed from mobile devices now, consumers use their devices to find their favorite companies so a strong mobile presence is a must if companies do not want to lose business. Hasbro goes mobile According to Mobile Marketer, Hasbro has decided to create a mobile presence in order to keep up with video games. So far Hasbro’s Monopoly application has been a great success because it promotes family and friend engagement and users can personalize the app by uploading pictures of themselves to use as game pieces. Consumers like personalization, and so if companies want to see success from their mobile marketing strategies they should consider personalizing them to consumers in some way. Companies hesitate to go mobile because they are set in their ways, and they might already be seeing success, however as technology advances all companies should consider building a mobile presence if they want to continue to be successful. Successful mobile marketing techniques Thanks to mobile devices there are a number of ways companies can reach out to consumers who use them. SMS advertisements are a great way to personalize advertising for consumers making them feel important and ultimately driving in business. Marketing applications are another way companies can engage with consumers on a more personal basis. Consumers like to be in control, and applications are a great way they can control the type of marketing they receive. If apps are intriguing enough, consumers are likely to promote them to friends and family, which will ultimately promote business. Convenience of being mobile Consumers like the convenience of being able to locate and engage with their favorite companies from their mobile devices, so it is important that companies maintain that presence. Consumers are looking for ways to make their lives easier, and being able to purchase products with the click of a button or pay bills on the fly will only increase business for companies because consumers are always looking for convenience. Being mobile can benefit companies in several ways, but one way that is especially appealing to companies is the ease of keeping track of business thanks to their mobile presence. Mobile devices and websites help companies to keep track of important data such as which marketing strategies are working the best and where most of the sales are coming from. Being mobile can enhance business in several ways and should be a priority for all companies. Mobile Technology News brought to you by businesstexter.com Source: mobilemarketer.com/cms/news/gaming/18437.html

Why we use open source - Australia’s Immigration agency explains

Why choose open source? “In some ways, [the open source software used by the agency] is effectively more capable” than commercial products, he said. “In terms of cost-effectiveness, [it] wins hands down: no license/maintenance fees, extensible architecture [and] global open source R&D.” The team uses an open source software package called ‘R’. Read more