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Security

Canonical Patches Six New Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities in Ubuntu 15.10 and 14.04

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Security
Ubuntu

Today, April 6, Canonical has announced the availability of new kernel versions for its Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf), Ubuntu 15.10 for Raspberry Pi 2, and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating systems.

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Shodan2Sheets

    After spending last night working on a Reverse DNS Function for Google Sheets I couldnt leave well enough alone and wrote Shodan2Sheets tonight using the shodan.io api.

  • Security is a process, not a reaction

    If this sounds familiar, you are probably running a web application of some kind. Maybe your whole business depends on it. Maybe you didn't hear about the latest world-on-fire vulnerability. Panic.

    How do you keep up with security issues when everything is happening so fast? Which parts of your technical stack are the most at risk? Is the customer data safe? Do you really need to care?

  • Three-year-old IBM patch for critical Java flaw is broken

    Attackers can easily bypass the patch to exploit a vulnerability that allows them to escape from the Java security sandbox

  • FBI Says a Mysterious Hacking Group Has Had Access to US Govt Files for Years

    The feds warned that “a group of malicious cyber actors,” whom security experts believe to be the government-sponsored hacking group known as APT6, “have compromised and stolen sensitive information from various government and commercial networks” since at least 2011, according to an FBI alert obtained by Motherboard.

    The alert, which is also available online, shows that foreign government hackers are still successfully hacking and stealing data from US government’s servers, their activities going unnoticed for years. This comes months after the US government revealed that a group of hackers, widely believed to be working for the Chinese government, had for more than a year infiltrated the computer systems of the Office of Personnel Management, or OPM. In the process, they stole highly sensitive data about several millions of government workers and even spies.

  • Sources: Trump Hotels Breached Again

    Banking industry sources tell KrebsOnSecurity that the Trump Hotel Collection — a string of luxury properties tied to business magnate and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump — appears to be dealing with another breach of its credit card systems. If confirmed, this would be the second such breach at the Trump properties in less than a year.

Security Leftovers

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Security

Matriux Linux Operating System For Hackers — An Alternative To Kali Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Matriux is an open source Linux-based operating system that’s designed in accordance with the needs of security researchers and professionals. The OS comes with more than 300 hacking tools that include the likes of Wireshark, Aircrack-ng, Nmap, Vidalia, TrueCrypt and more. Matriux hacking OS features a traditional desktop environment that’s powered by GNOME Classic

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Linux Ransomware and why everyone could be affected [Ed: Bitdefender ad as ‘article’]
  • Kaiten targets Linux routers, gateways, access points and now IoT

    Change default passwords on network equipment even if it is not reachable from the Internet.

  • Security is really about Risk vs Reward

    Every now and then the conversation erupts about what is security really? There's the old saying that the only secure computer is one that's off (or fill in your favorite quote here, there are hundreds). But the thing is, security isn't the binary concept: you can be secure, or insecure. That's not how anything works. Everything is a sliding scale, you are never secure, you are never insecure. You're somewhere in the middle. Rather than bumble around about your risk though, you need to understand what's going on and plan for the risk.

Safety/Privacy in Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security
  • Firefox and cookie micromanagement

    For most of its existence, Firefox has provided users with the ability to manage how cookies are stored with a rather high degree of granularity: users can block specific cookies, create site-wide exceptions to the accept/block policy, and configure behavior for third-party cookies. Up until Firefox 44, there was an additional option as well, one that allowed users to choose the expiration point (that is, expiring them at the end of the session or letting them persist) for every cookie they encounter. That option was removed in the Firefox 44 release, which has made some users rather unhappy.

    The option in question was found in the Privacy preferences screen, labeled "Ask me every time" on the "Keep until:" selector. When enabled, the option raised a dialog box asking the user to accept or reject each cookie encountered, with a "accept for this session only" choice provided. Removing the option was proposed in 2010, although the patch to perform the removal did not land until 2015. It was released in Firefox 44 in January 2016.

  • How Safe Browsing works in Firefox

    If you want to learn more about how Safe Browsing works in Firefox, you can find all of the technical details on the Safe Browsing and Application Reputation pages of the Mozilla wiki or you can ask questions on our mailing list.

  • Decentraleyes Addon Fixes Browser Privacy, Circumvents CDNs

    Widespread CDN acceptance has been a security flaw that sacrifices privacy simply because it breaks web pages on anything put a text-based browser, which is a sacrifice few are willing to make for the sake of their information remaining local.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Reviewing Important Healthcare Cybersecurity Frameworks [Ed: Microsoft Windows]

    Just recently, a ransomware attack affected Hollywood Presbyterian in California, causing the hospital to pay $17,000 to regain access to its databases.

  • U.S., Canada issue joint alert on 'ransomware' after hospital attacks [iophk: The governments need to track down those spreading Windows in the hospitals.]

    The United States and Canada on Thursday issued a rare joint cyber alert, warning against a recent surge in extortion attacks that infect computers with viruses known as "ransomware," which encrypt data and demand payments for it to be unlocked.

    The warning follows reports from several private security firms that they expect the crisis to worsen, because hackers are getting more sophisticated and few businesses have adopted proper security measures to thwart such attacks.

  • NIST Publishes New Security Standard For Encrypting Credit Card, Medical Info

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed new encryption methods for securing financial data and other sensitive information.

    The NIST publication SP 800-38G authored by Morris Dworkin specifies cryptography standards for both binary and non-binary data, preserving the look and feel of the unencrypted digits. Earlier encryption methods designed by NIST worked for binary data. But for strings of decimal numbers, there was no feasible technique to produce coded data that preserves the original format.

LibreOffice 5.2 Launches in August, First Bug Hunting Session Starts April 22

Filed under
LibO
Security

On March 31, 2016, The Document Foundation Co-Founder Italo Vignoli announced the release plan for the upcoming major release of the world's popular free office suite, LibreOffice 5.2.

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UbuCon Paris Party Starts Today In Celebration of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Release

Yesterday we reported on the fact that even if Canonical unveiled the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system last month, on April 21, several LoCos are still organizing release parties. Read more

Why I won’t use Dropbox’s Project Infinite if it’s not open source

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Open-source vs. Proprietary – Keeping Ideology Out of the Equation

Open-source really means no more and no less than making the source code readily available to anyone. Thus, open-source makes no statement as to the licensing conditions for using the software, whether there are charges for using the software, whether the software is supported, or actively developed, or any good, and so on. Closed-source means that source code is not readily available, but makes no comment on issues like licensing, costs, support, and quality. Read more

NetOS Enterprise Linux 8 Promises to Be a Worthy Alternative to Chrome OS

Black Lab Software CEO Roberto J. Dohnert informs Softpedia today about the general availability of the NetOS Enterprise Developer Preview 8 operating system. Designed as a replacement for the Linux kernel-based Chrome OS or Chromium OS operating systems, Black Lab Software's upcoming NetOS distribution is using the same technologies that have been implemented in the Enterprise Edition of the Black Lab Linux OS. Read more