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Microsoft

Qt 6 Might Drop Their Short-Lived Universal Windows Platform Support

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Development
Microsoft

While the Universal Windows Platform (UWP) is needed for targeting the Xbox One, Microsoft HoloLens, and IoT, The Qt Company is thinking about gutting out their UWP support in the big Qt 6 tool-kit update.

The Qt Company is busy brainstorming changes for Qt 6, which is expected to see its maiden release in late 2020 barring any delays. One of those fundamental changes being tossed around is eliminating the Universal Windows Platform coverage with Qt 6.0.

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Direct: Qt 6 Planning: Consideration of dropping support for UWP applications

OSS Openwashing and Licensing

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
  • OSI updates licence categories

    The European Union Public Licence (EUPL) is now listed among “International licenses”, with CeCILL (a licence created in France by the three main public IT research organisations, INRIA, CEA and CNRS) and LiLiQ (a licence created by the State of Quebec – Canada)

  • Open Source vs. Open Core: What's the Difference? [iophk: "Microsoft contaminating and disrupting whole projects"]

    "Open source is everywhere," said Holger Mueller, vice president and principal analyst at Constellation Research. A quick look at the proprietary software vendors of yesteryear drives his point home. Open Source code is not only leveraged by most of them, but they are also large contributors to open source projects. Consider that Cisco, Google, IBM, Microsoft, Pivotal, SAP, SUSE and many others back the Cloud Foundry Foundation. And even though Red Hat is the company everyone points to when they think open source, Microsoft has twice as many employees — 4,550 — who contribute code to open source projects. Amazon, IBM and SAP also land in the top 10.

  • Pengwin: A Linux specifically for Windows Subsystem for Linux [Ed: This isn't "Linux", that's just Windows and Microsoft is hijacking the brand.]

The 'New' Microsoft and Right to Repair Bills

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Microsoft
  • Not just Apple: Microsoft has been quietly lobbying to kill Right to Repair bills

    Rep. Jeff Morris told iFixit Repair Radio that national Right to Repair legislation was killed by Microsoft, in a piece of horse trading that saw Microsoft backing funding for STEM education in exchange for Right to Repair (and unrelated privacy rules) dying.

  • [Repeated] Microsoft played key role in stopping “Right to Repair” in Washington

    He shed some light on the kinds of things Microsoft lobbyists were doing, saying that last year, “Microsoft was going around telling our members that they wouldn’t sell Surface Tablets in Washington any longer if we passed the bill.”

    In our own conversations about the opposition to Right to Repair in Olympia, Microsoft’s full-throated opposition was often brought up by legislators, and it was to clear to us that the company was lobbying extensively against the bill, and was the most high-profile opponent.

  • Microsoft is reportedly blocking the 'Right To Repair' bill through lobbying

    According to MSPowerUser, Jeff Morris, a Democrat member of the House of Representatives, has been using its influence to block a bill which, on the face of it, has support across the house and a whopping 87 per cent support amongst US citizens.

    He claims that, according to his sources, Microsoft had offered to support a tax which would be used to fund STEM education, but only if the Right To Repair bill was quietly dropped. A second stipulation surrounding privacy policies was also on the table.

  • Microsoft has been quietly lobbying against Right to Repair legislation

    As a device OEM Microsoft has an interest in preventing customers from repairing their own devices, complicating their support and potentially reducing the need to buy a new device.

    87% of consumers however support Right to Repair and flexing their muscle in such an anti-consumer manner is extremely anti-democratic, especially when Microsoft paints themselves as socially responsible.

Windows Security Circus

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
  • ApparitionSec

    Internet Explorer is a series of graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included in the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems, starting in 1995.

  • Internet Explorer Flaw Lets Hackers Steal Your Files Even If You Don’t Use It

    Internet Explorer was already useless for most of us, but now it is dangerous to have the obsolete browser on your computer. A security researcher, John Page, found a new security flaw in Internet Explorer that allows hackers to steal data.

  • Internet Explorer exploit lets hackers steal your data even if you never use it

    Finally stopped using Internet Explorer? Good! But, now it’s time to completely delete it from your computer, too. Security researcher John Page has discovered a new security flaw that allows hackers to steal Windows users’ data thanks to Internet Explorer. The craziest part: Windows users don’t ever even have to open the now-obsolete web browser for malicious actors to use the exploit. It just needs to exist on their computer.

Latest Microsoft Openwashing and Entryism

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Microsoft

Microsoft Windows in the Public Sector Versus NASA cFS Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Openwashing and Microsoft's Attack/Entryism/FUD Against FOSS

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Canonical Works for Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

The end of the desktop?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

I’ve been predicting for a while that Microsoft is moving us away from its PC-centric Windows operating system to a cloud-based rental version of Windows.
Now, with the Windows Virtual Desktop beta finally showing up, we’re a step closer to the death of the PC.
I’m old enough to remember how the PC changed everything. Before it, computer users depended on time-sharing systems and dumb terminals, and the companies or schools that owned the centralized computing power called all the shots. After it, we all had our own computing power right on our desks, to do with as we pleased.
The arrival of the beta Windows Virtual Desktop is a harbinger of the end of the PC era. We’re about to take a big step back to the centralised/controlled past.
And maybe that’s OK for most people. I’ve noticed that, even as our lives become ever more centred around technology, fewer people actually are interested in the technology itself. Oh, they love using it, but understanding it at a deep level? Not so much.
Of course, at one time, to get any work done with a computer, you first had to learn a lot, about computers, operating systems, commands and more. Eventually, “friendly” became the most important adverb in computing circles, and we’ve reached the point in user-friendliness that people don’t even talk about it anymore.
Today, Google has shown with its Chrome OS that most of us can pretty much do anything we need to do on a computer with just a web browser.

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Microsoft Redefines Ownership

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Microsoft
  • Microsoft has closed its e-bookstore, and everything you purchased will vanish in July

    The answer, simply put, is that they’ll disappear entirely sometime around July 2019, and you’ll be given a full refund. If you ordered or rented an ebook before today, your order will be cancelled and refunded. Free ebooks downloaded via the Microsoft Store app will also disappear, and they won’t be available after July, either.

  • Microsoft announces it will shut down ebook program and confiscate its customers' libraries

    Microsoft has a DRM-locked ebook store that isn't making enough money, so they're shutting it down and taking away every book that every one of its customers acquired effective July 1.

  • Microsoft removes the Books category from the Microsoft Store

    Previously purchased books and rentals will be accessible until early July, but after this, books will no longer be accessible, officials said in a customer-support article today. The company is promising full refunds for all content purchased from the Books category; anyone who bought books via the Store will receive further details on how to get refunds via email from Microsoft.

  • Microsoft stops selling ebooks, offers refunds to customers

    If you have been using the Microsoft Store as your point of purchase for ebooks, you're going to have to start shopping elsewhere. Microsoft has ditched the Books category from the store, and this means that not only will it not be possible to buy books from the Microsoft Store, but also that previous purchases will not be accessible after July.

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