Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Microsoft

Microsoft Entryism/EEE Now a Step Further

Filed under
Microsoft

[Ed: Rant warning]

Love Microsoft Teams? Love Linux? Then you won't love this

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft loves Linux. Unless you are a Linux user who happens to want to use Teams. In that case, you probably aren’t feeling the love quite so much.

Read more

Microsoft Lies and Openwashing

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Openwashing: Asay, Saran and More

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Microsoft is Sabotaging PCs Again, Google Has New Laptops/Tablets, Samsung Chromebook

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
  • Windows 10 Version 1809 Cumulative Update KB4464330 Causes BSODs

    Windows 10 cumulative update KB4464330 for version 1809, as well as cumulative update KB4462919 for the April Update (version 1803), are both pushing a number of HP systems into a BSOD loop, with no easy method to go back to a functional desktop.

  • Pixelbook vs. Pixel Slate: Which Chrome OS Device is the Better Choice?

    As expected, Google announced its first house-branded Chrome OS tablet, the Pixel Slate, a few days ago. It looks like a great device, but how does it compare to the Pixelbook when it comes to a high-end Chrome OS machine?

    Before we get into the comparison, it’s probably worth talking about what this means for current Pixelbook owners. To put it plainly, if you already have a Pixelbook there’s very little reason to consider getting a Slate—it isn’t even an upgrade, but more of a lateral movement from the Pixelbook. It’s an incredibly similar device in a slightly different package.

  • Samsung’s Updated Chromebook Plus V2 Adds LTE Connectivity to an Already-Great Device

    The premium Chromebook market has exploded over the last couple of years, and Samsung helped push that charge with the Chromebook Pro and Plus. It recently revamped the Plus model with updated internals, and now it’s adding LTE to that platform.

    If you’re not familiar with the Chromebook Plus, here’s a bit of backstory for you. The original Chromebook Plus was launched at CES in 2017 alongside the Chromebook Pro. Samsung has since revamped the Plus hardware with an updated processor for improved performance, calling this new version the Chromebook Plus V2. Super original.

Openwashing Leftovers

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Open Invention Network is a Proponent of Software Patents -- Just Like Microsoft -- and Microsoft Keeps Patents It Uses to Blackmail Linux Vendors

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Legal

OIN loves Microsoft; OIN loves software patents as well. So Microsoft’s membership in OIN is hardly a surprise and it’s not solving the main issue either, as Microsoft can indirectly sue and “Microsoft has not included any patents they might hold on exfat into the patent non-aggression pact,” according to Bradley M. Kuhn

Read more

FUD and Openwashing (Making Malicious Software Seem Ethical)

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

How to openwash proprietary surveillance companies

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Windows Wipes

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
  • Bug in Windows 10’s Latest Update Might Be Deleting Files, Back Up Your Data Now

    Multiple Windows users are reporting the latest update is deleting documents. Consider backing up your data right now.

  • Windows 10 October 2018 Update Is Apparently Wiping Out User Data

    Windows 10 October 2018 update was announced a while back and Microsoft mentioned that the new update would come with support for DirectX Ray Tracing. The API that will support Nvidia RTX graphics cards with features like ray tracing and DLSS.

    It turns out, the update is now being halted due to an issue with Intel drivers that are causing some unexpected problems. Some people have reported losing their data when updating to Windows 10 October 2018 update. Rollback is also not something that will solve this issue as it turns out, once you update your data is gone and it’s pretty much irreversible.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Intel Core i9 9900K vs. AMD Ryzen 7 2700X Linux Gaming Benchmarks

Complementing the just-published Intel Core i9 9900K Linux benchmarks with the launch-day embargo lift are the Linux gaming benchmarks... This article is looking at the Linux performance between the Core i9 9900K and AMD's Ryzen 7 2700X in a variety of native Linux games as well as comparing the performance-per-Watt. So if you are a Linux gamer and deciding between these sub-$500 processors, this article is for you. If you didn't yet read the main article that features a 15-way CPU comparison on Ubuntu 18.10 with the Linux 4.19 kernel, here is a recap of this new Coffeelake refresh CPU. The Core i9 9900K is an eight-core / sixteen-thread processor with 3.6GHz base frequency and 5.0GHz turbo frequency. This 14nm CPU has a 16MB L3 cache, dual channel DDR4-2666 support, and a 95 Watt TDP. There is also the onboard UHD Graphics 630, but if you're a gamer, that isn't going to cut it. The Core i9 9900K is launching at $499 USD. Read more

Intel Core i9 9900K Linux Benchmarks - 15-Way Intel/AMD Comparison On Ubuntu 18.10

Intel sent over the Core i9 9900K as their first 9th Gen Coffeelake-S CPU hitting store shelves today. With the embargo on that now expired, let's have a look at how well this eight-core / sixteen-thread processor performs under Linux. The Core i9 9900K is Intel's new answer for competing with the likes of the AMD Ryzen 7 2700X, but does come at a higher price point of $499 USD. While the Core i9 9900K is a Coffeelake refresh, rather than being six cores / twelve threads, they are matching AMD's precedent set by the Ryzen 7 processors in having eight cores / sixteen threads. This 14nm 8C / 16T processor has a base clock frequency of 3.6GHz with a turbo frequency at 5.0GHz, a 16MB L3 cache and supports dual-channel DDR4-2666 memory. Read more

Google: Desktop, Server and Kernel

  • Chrome OS Linux support to gain folder sharing, Google Drive, more
    Chrome OS has been shaping up to be the all-in-one system, combining the best of Google’s ecosystem, including Android apps, with the power of Linux apps. The latter is still in beta phase with improvements and new features in every update. Today we take a look at some of the features coming soon to Chrome OS Linux apps. Chrome OS first gained its Linux app support, also known as Crostini, with version 69. While it’s certainly not flawless, the support has been groundbreaking, enabling everything from full photo editors to Android Studio on Chrome OS. With upcoming versions of Chrome OS, Google is working to smoothen the rough edges of Crostini to make it easier to use.
  • Google Cloud CTO Brian Stevens on using open source for competitive advantage in the public cloud
    As all three continue to vie for the affections of CIOs, how they market their respective public cloud propositions to enterprise IT buyers has subtly shifted over time. For evidence of this, one only has to look at how little fuss the big three now make about rolling out price cuts for their services compared to several years ago, when one provider announcing a price drop would not only make headlines, but prompt its competitors to publicly follow suit too. This in itself is indicative of the fact enterprises expect more from providers than just access to cheap commodity IT services these days, and that ongoing cost reductions are simply an accepted part of using cloud, Google Cloud CTO Brian Stevens, tells Computer Weekly.
  • KUnit: A new unit testing framework for Linux Kernel
    On Tuesday, Google engineer Brendan Higgins announced an experimental set of 31 patches by introducing KUnit as a new Linux kernel unit testing framework to help preserve and improve the quality of the kernel’s code. KUnit is a lightweight unit testing and mocking framework designed for the Linux kernel. Unit tests necessarily have finer granularity, they are able to test all code paths easily solving the classic problem of difficulty in exercising error handling code.