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Microsoft

Special 'Fun' With Apple’s iCloud and Microsoft's 'Cloud'

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
  • Windows 10’s October Update Breaks Apple’s iCloud

    Windows 10’s October 2018 Update has more bugs. Microsoft won’t offer the update if you have iCloud installed, and Apple won’t let you install iCloud if you’ve already upgraded. You’ll also have trouble if you have F5 VPN software installed.

    This information comes from Microsoft’s own Windows 10 Update History page, where Microsoft is publicly tracking the October Update’s bugs.

    According to Microsoft, Apple iCloud version 7.7.0.27 has an incompatibility with the latest update. You’ll have trouble updating or synchronizing Shared Albums after upgrading. If you try installing iCloud on the October Update, you’ll see an error message saying “iCloud for Windows requires Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10 (April 2018 Update) and earlier.”

  • Microsoft limits functionality for older versions of the Office: Enterprise users to suffer additional subscription costs

    Initially launched as a whole suite for businesses of all kinds, Microsoft Office 365 came out back in 2011, introducing a cloud based software service. Before this, Microsoft only focused on corporate software on the cloud, which was very limited. Since then, Office 365 has gained quite the customer satisfaction, considering it is used in almost all universities for education, in corporate firms, in households, with their sharing plans and otherwise. While this was a good way of revenue generation, Microsoft went a step further, when it launched the new Office 2019 this past September.

    While this new Office opens up features for the users, it also puts a nail in the way for Corporations that have found ways around office subscriptions, limiting them to an older version in order to get full functionality. Microsoft steps in this time around, with the release of their latest version of the Office platform.

Microsoft's Vista 10 Disaster Returns, Privacy Violations, and Moving to GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • If at first or second you don't succeed, you may be Microsoft: Hold off installing re-released Windows Oct Update

    The 1809 build of Windows 10 and Windows Server is fast becoming infamous. Microsoft pulled it shortly after release when it started deleting people's files, and stumbling in other ways. Redmond reissued the software on Tuesday, and today it's clear you shouldn't rush into deploying it, if installing it at all, in its present state.

  • Microsoft Just Crammed Ads Into Windows 10 Mail. When Will They Stop? [Ed: With Vista 10 the users are the product. The spies from Microsoft spy on them (sometimes illegally, but these people are above the law) and their real clients are advertisers.]

    Whether it’s pre-installing Candy Crush Saga, showing full-screen ads on your lock screen, or displaying banner ads in File Explorer, Microsoft has been shoehorning ads into every inch of Windows 10. The Mail app is getting them next.

    Update: Microsoft’s head of communications, Frank Shaw, just backpedaled on Twitter. He said “this is an experimental feature that was never intended to be tested broadly and is being turned off.” As Mehedi Hassan notes over at Thurrott, this is a strange claim because Microsoft has a detailed support page explaining these advertisements.

  • Microsoft menaced with GDPR mega-fines in Europe for 'large scale and covert' gathering of people's info via Office

    Microsoft broke Euro privacy rules by carrying out the "large scale and covert" gathering of private data through its Office apps.

    That's according to a report out this month [PDF] that was commissioned by the Dutch government into how information handled by 300,000 of its workers was processed by Microsoft's Office ProPlus suite. This software is installed on PCs and connects to Office 365 servers.

    The dossier's authors found that the Windows goliath was collecting telemetry and other content from its Office applications, including email titles and sentences where translation or spellchecker was used, and secretly storing the data on systems in the United States. That's a no-no.

    Those actions break Europe's new GDPR privacy safeguards, it is claimed, and may put Microsoft on the hook for potentially tens of millions of dollars in fines. The Dutch authorities are working with the corporation to fix the situation, and are using the threat of a fine as a stick to make it happen.

  • How old were you when you first started using Linux?

    Whether you switched from another operating system, or are one of the lucky few who knew no OS before it, all of us were beginners at some point.

    How old were you when you started using Linux? Do you remember that time clearly, or is it so far in the past that it's but a faint memory?

    Regardless of the answer, let us know when it was, and maybe, a bit about what that experience has meant to you.

Another Fine Update Cycle From Microsoft

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Microsoft
  • Windows 10 1809's new rollout: Mapped drives broken, AMD issues, Trend Micro clash

    Within days of Microsoft's first release of Windows 10 1809 at the beginning of October, IT pros noticed that Windows File Explorer indicated that mapped network drives appeared to be broken.

    "Testing the new 1809 update, and everything seems to be fine except all mapped drives to Windows 2012 file servers show disconnected (red x) after reboots or logoff/on," wrote one IT pro on October 5, with many others confirming the same issue on company networks.

  • Windows 10’s October 2018 Update Breaks Mapped Network Drives

    Microsoft’s October 2018 Update drama is largely over, but there are still a few lingering bugs. Microsoft has confirmed an issue where mapped network drives are broken after a PC restarts. This will not be fixed until 2019.

Microsoft Spies on Customers, Red Hat Connections to Government

Filed under
Red Hat
Microsoft
Misc
  • Microsoft covertly collects personal data from enterprise Office ProPlus users

    Privacy Company released the results of a data protection impact assessment showing privacy risks in the enterprise version of Microsoft Office.

  • DLT Named Red Hat Public Sector Partner for 2019; Brian Strosser Quoted

    Red Hat has selected DLT Solutions as its Public Sector Partner of the Year in recognition of the Herndon, Va.-based tech firm’s contributions to the former’s business efforts.

    DLT said Tuesday it provides government agencies with resale access to open-source technologies such as Red Hat’s cloud, middleware and Linux software offerings.

    The company has provided services in support of Red Hat’s products through contracts under the General Services Administration‘s GSA Schedule, NASA‘s SEWP V, the Defense Department‘s Enterprise Software Initiative and the National Institutes of Health‘s Chief Information Officer – Commodities and Solutions vehicles.

More Empty Promises From Microsoft

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Microsoft

The Linux desktop: With great success comes great failure

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

And what do roughly 95.6% of all websites run on? With the exception of Microsoft sites, the answer is Linux. Facebook? Linux. Google? Linux. Yahoo? Linux. Netflix? Linux. I can go on and on. You may use Windows on your desktop, but it’s effectively just a front end to Linux-based services and data. You might as well be using a Chromebook (running on Linux-based Chrome OS, by the way).

But as a matter of fact, Windows is no longer the top end-user operating system. Oh yes, it does still dominate the desktop, but the desktop hasn’t been king of the end-user hill for some time. By StatCounter’s reckoning, the most popular end-user operating system as of September 2018, with 40.85% market share, was — drum roll, please — Android. Which — guess what — is based on Linux.

So, in several senses, Linux has been the top end-user operating system for some time.

But not on the desktop, where Windows still reigns.

Why? There are many reasons.

Back when desktop Linux got its start, Microsoft kept it a niche operating system by using strong-arm tactics with PC vendors. For instance, when Linux-powered netbooks gave Microsoft serious competition on low-end laptops in the late ’00s, Microsoft dug XP Home up from the graveyard to stop it in its tracks.

But Microsoft’s avid competitiveness is only part of the story. In fact, Microsoft has gotten quite chummy with Linux lately. It’s fair to say that it’s no longer trying to stop the Linux desktop from gaining ground.

Read more

Also: Palliative care for Windows 10 Mobile like a Crimean field hospital, but with even less effort

The "Microsoft Loves Linux" lie

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Paging Linux Users: What Made You Give Up on Windows? [Ed: Microsoft propagandist Bogdan Popa keeps spreading the "Microsoft Loves Linux" lie. That doesn't mean anything good. "Enemies closer" and all...]
  • Microsoft Acquires Obsidian & inXile Entertainment [Ed: The game studios always shut down after Microsoft buys them]

    As what could spell bad news for seeing native Linux game ports of future Pillars and Wasteland titles, among others, Microsoft announced they are acquiring Obsidian Entertainment and inXile Entertainment.

    Microsoft is acquiring Obsidian Entertainment and inXile Entertainment as part of their effort to deliver "a steady stream of new, exclusive games to our fans." That exclusive reference doesn't bode well if you were fans of inXile or Obsidian games on Linux.

  • Obsidian Entertainment and inXile Entertainment have officially joined Microsoft

    Some rather interesting news here, both Obsidian Entertainment and inXile Entertainment (source) have now officially joined Microsoft.

    Together, they've made some pretty interesting Linux games such as Pillars of Eternity, Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire, Tyranny, Wasteland 2, Torment: Tides of Numenera, The Bard's Tale IV: Barrows Deep and more to come.

    [...]

    As long as both studios retain a certain amount of freedom, I think we should be okay for future titles. Microsoft loves Linux after all…right? [sarcasm]

    I have to be honest, I'm a little in shock myself at this news.

Microsoft and Apple Against Repairs

Filed under
Hardware
Microsoft
Mac

Desktop: System76 Sale and Vista 10 Breaking Itself Again

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • System76 laptops are on sale, plus they will donate to select open source projects from sales until Jan 3rd

    After recently releasing their own in-house designed Thelio desktop system, System76 have announced they're giving away some funding to open source projects from laptop sales.

    The projects include KiCad, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Free Software Foundation (FSF), and the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA). "We picked these four projects to represent a wide array of efforts within open source initiatives." Says Louisa Bisio at System76.

  • A Bug In Windows 10 Pro Is Forcing Users Downgrade To Windows 10 Home

    A bug-free Windows 10 October Update still seems to be far away, and Windows users have already come up with another issue.

    According to a trending Reddit thread, many Microsoft Windows users are complaining that their Windows Pro version is demoted to Windows Home version without any notification or prior warning.

Chromebooks With GNU/Linux Software and Windows Breaking Itself (Again)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft
  • Linux Apps For MediaTek Chromebooks A Little Closer

    If you are the proud owner of a MediaTek-powered Chromebook such as the Acer Chromebook R13 or Lenovo Flex 11, some new features are headed your way.

    Spotted in the Canary channel in mid-October, the Crostini Project is now live in the Developer channel for Chromebooks with the ARM-based MediaTek processor. This brings native Linux app functionality to the Chromebooks with the MT8173C chipset and although the number of devices is few, MediaTek Chromebooks are relatively inexpensive and versatile machines.

  • Some Chromebooks Won’t Get Linux Apps. Here’s What You Can Do Instead

    When Chromebooks first began getting support for Android apps, there was some confusion as to just which Chromebooks would be supported. The same thing is starting to play out—though to a lesser degree—with support for Linux apps.

    You’ve always been able to install Linux applications (or other Linux-based operating systems) on Chromebooks through a workaround called Crouton because Chrome OS is based on the Linux kernel. The new method for installing Linux apps is much easier than before since it’s a baked-in part of the operating system.

    But not all Chromebooks will get official support for Linux apps. Here’s the deal.

  • The Chromium OS rootfs is mounted read-only. In developer mode you can disable the rootfs verification, enabling it to be modified.
  • Microsoft Acknowledges Issues with Edge Developer Tools and SQL Connection in cumulative update KB4462933

    In October 2018, Microsoft had release a cumulative update KB4462933 for Windows 10 V1803 users who had installed Windows 10 April 2018 update. This cumulative update released on 24th October lifted Windows 10 V1803 to build 17134376. It was a massive update with several important improvements and fixes. However, there were two main issues with this update that no one had noticed before, BornCity reports. One of the issues is the dysfunctional behavior of Edge Developer Tools and another is problems with SQL connections. These issues were also acknowledged by Microsoft on its support page for this update.

    According to WindowsLatest, Microsoft had not originally acknowledged the presence of these issues but later quietly updated the document to confirm these two issues being faced with the latest update.

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More in Tux Machines

A Linux/Android kit tablet and "the tiny single-board computers called Raspberry Pi"

  • A Linux/Android kit tablet
    I would like to introduce Diskio Pi, a kit tablet compatible Raspberry Pi and Odroid small boards computer.
  • Raspberry Pi OS Raspbian Now Features VLC Media Player, Minimal Install Image
    The Raspberry Pi Foundation released a new version of its Debian-based Raspbian Linux operating system for Raspberry Pi devices, a release that adds new features, updates, and many other interesting things. Raspbian 2018-11-13 is now the latest version of the Linux and Debian-based operating system for the tiny single-board computers called Raspberry Pi, introducing a new default media player, namely VLC Media Player, with fully hardware-accelerated support through VideoCore’s video engine for H.264, VC-1, and MPEG-2 formats.

OSS Leftovers

  • 5 Best Chrome Extensions For Reading News In 2019
    The internet is the major source of news for many of us, and we spend a lot of time reading articles to stay updated. There are many news sources available that offer various categories of news. However, it is a time-consuming task to open each of those websites.
  • 6 Essential Tips for Safe Online Shopping
    The turkey sandwiches are in the fridge, and you didn’t argue with your uncle. It’s time to knock out that gift list, and if you’re like millions of Americans, you’re probably shopping online.
  • Elementary Bugs
    Mozilla is a well-known open-source organization, and thus draws a lot of interested contributors. But Mozilla is huge, and even the more limited scope of Firefox development is a wilderness to a newcomer. We have developed various tools to address this, one of which was an Outreachy project by Fienny Angelina called Codetribute. The site aggregates bugs that experienced developers have identified as good for new contributors (“good first bugs”, although often they are features or tasks) across Bugzilla and Github. It’s useful both for self-motivated contributors and for those looking for starting point for a deeper engagement with Mozilla (an internship or even a full-time job). However, it’s been tricky to help developers identify good-first-bugs.
  • Open Source Cloudify 4.5 Extends its Cloud Native Orchestration to the Network - from Core to Edge [Ed: Another example of proprietary and "Community" edition for openwashing purposes]
  • Why some open-source companies are considering a more closed approach
    “I would put it in a very blunt way: for many years we were suckers, and let them take what we developed and make tons of money on this.” Redis Labs CEO Ofer Bengal doesn’t mince words. His company, known for its open-source in-memory database, has been around for eight years, an eternity in the fast-changing world of modern enterprise software. Cloud computing was very much underway in 2011, but it was still a tool for early adopters or startups that couldn’t afford to bet millions on servers to incubate a promising but unproven idea. Most established companies were still building their own tech infrastructure the old-fashioned way, but they were increasingly realizing that open-source software would allow them to build that infrastructure with open-source components in ways that were much more flexible and cheaper than proprietary packages from traditional enterprise software companies.
  • Rob Port: Audit: North Dakota’s use of open source textbooks has saved North Dakota students a lot of money
    For generations now the cost of higher education has been out of control. This isn’t exactly news to you, I’m sure, but it may surprise you to know that the cost of textbooks has grown even faster than the rapid increase in tuition costs.
  • Envoy and gRPC-Web: a fresh new alternative to REST
    Personally, I’d been intrigued by gRPC-Web since I first read about it in a blog post on the Improbable engineering blog. I’ve always loved gRPC’s performance, scalability, and IDL-driven approach to service interaction and have longed for a way to eliminate REST from the service path if possible. I’m excited that gRPC-Web is ready for prime time because I think it opens up some extremely promising horizons in web development.
  • 2018 LLVM Developers' Meeting Videos Now Online
    For those wishing to learn more about the LLVM compiler stack and open-source compiler toolchains in general, the videos from October's LLVM Developers' Meeting 2018 in San Jose are now online.
  • OpenBSD in Stereo with Linux VFIO

    Now, after some extensive reverse engineering and debugging with the help of VFIO on Linux, I finally have audio playing out of both speakers on OpenBSD.

  • RcppMsgPack 0.2.3
    Another maintenance release of RcppMsgPack got onto CRAN today. Two new helper functions were added and not unlike the previous 0.2.2 release in, some additional changes are internal and should allow compilation on all CRAN systems. MessagePack itself is an efficient binary serialization format. It lets you exchange data among multiple languages like JSON. But it is faster and smaller. Small integers are encoded into a single byte, and typical short strings require only one extra byte in addition to the strings themselves. RcppMsgPack brings both the C++ headers of MessagePack as well as clever code (in both R and C++) Travers wrote to access MsgPack-encoded objects directly from R.

Server: FOSS at the Back End of 'Cloud'

  • Google, Amazon and Facebook Embrace Open Source Software As Future
    Open source coding lets users collaborate on software code, giving them the ability to store and edit code independently. It is designed to make projects built with its software publicly accessible, and has been the key to success for companies like Airbnb and Uber, which have made their fortunes by offering services, rather than the software itself. “The previous generation of developers grew up in a world where there was a battle between closed and open source,” said GitHub's Ben Balter, a researcher with the web-based hosting service for source code and open source software projects. “Today, that is no longer true.”
  • AWS Developing New Services Amid Open-Source Tensions
    Companies that manage open-source software have a message for cloud computing providers like Amazon: pay up, share your code or stop using our technology for free.
  • AWS develops new services amid open-source pushback
    Last month, MongoDB changed its licensing to put the Community Server software under a SSPL license, which lets cloud providers offer MongoDB as a service but only if they open source all of the related code or create a commercial agreement.
  • Urvika Gola: Attending ReactConf’18 in Henderson, Nevada
    Day 2 of React Conf, started with talking about how performance is integral to UX. Code Splitting, a concept were instead of sending the whole code in the initial payload, we send what’s needed to render the first screen and later, lazily loading the rest based on subsequent navigation. A most common problem while implementing code splitting can be ‘what do you display to the user if the view hasn’t finished loading?’ Maybe a spinner, loader, placeholder…?? But lot of these degrades the UX. Then came Concurrent React into the picture, Concurrent React can work on multiple tasks at a time and switch between them according to priority. Concurrent React can partially render a tree without committing the result and does not block the main thread.
  • OpenStack Rebranding Infrastructure Team as OpenDev
    OpenStack is one of the largest open source efforts in the world, with a large infrastructure that is used to build, develop and test the cloud platform. The infrastructure effort is now being rebranded as OpenDev as OpenStack continues to evolve. In a session, at the OpenStack Summit in Berlin, Germany last week, Clark Boylan team lead for the OpenStack Infrastructure team outlined how things are set to change as OpenStack moves beyond its core project to embrace a broader group of Open Infrastructure efforts. "We basically act as beta testers for the infrastructure and make sure things work," Boylan. "If it works for us, it'll probably work for you too."

Unhappy With Apple

  • New iPad Pro Reportedly Suffering From Bending Issues
    It has not been one month since Apple launched its latest iPad Pro models. It has been found that the nearly bezel-less iPad Pro models are prone to bending issues. In a durability test video by the famous YouTuber JerryRigEverything, iPad Pro models bent when a slight force was applied to it. Many new iPad owners also took to MacRumor’s forum to complain about the bending of the latest iPad.
  • How Apple tricked me into buying a new MacBook Air
     

    I have been using MacBook Air laptops for several years now and I like them much better than anything in the Windows space. However, my experience has been far from problem-free and I am angry at what I believe is a deceptive business practice designed to screw money out of loyal users.  

     

    [...]

     

    So for $175 I got my computer completely fixed after being told by both Apple and an Authorised Apple repairer that it could not be salvaged. Furthermore, I subsequently discovered through online inquiry that this particular keyboard had a design fault and that I was not to blame at all for the damage. I had been tricked into buying a new computer needlessly.