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Microsoft

Change of Fedora Strategy (IBM) and Microsoft EEE of Fedora

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Red Hat
Microsoft

This Week in Linux, Chrome OS, and Death of Windows 10 Mobile

Filed under
OS
Linux
Microsoft
  • Episode 51 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got some new announcements from Inkscape, Purism, Solus, Mozilla, and Steam. We’ll also check out some new Distro releases from Netrunner, Deeping, Android X86 and more. Then we’ll look at some new hardware offerings from Purism and Entroware. Later in the show will talk about some drama happening with a project’s licensing issues and then we’ll round out the episode with some Linux Gaming news including some sales from Humble Bundle. All that and much more!

  • Chrome OS 73 Dev Channel adds Google Drive, Play Files mount in Linux, USB device management and Crostini backup flag

    On Tuesday, Google released the first iteration of Chrome OS 73 for the Dev Channel and there are quite a few new items related to Project Crostini, for Linux app support. Some things in the lengthy changelog only set up new features coming soon while others add new functionality. Here’s a rundown on some of the Crostini additions to Chrome OS 73.

  • Tens to be disappointed as Windows 10 Mobile death date set: Doomed phone OS won't see 2020

    Microsoft has formally set the end date for support of its all-but-forgotten Windows 10 Mobile platform.

    The Redmond code factory said today that, come December 10, it's curtains for the ill-fated smartphone venture. The retirement will end a four-year run for a Microsoft phone effort that never really got off the ground and helped destroy Nokia in the process.

    "The end of support date applies to all Windows 10 Mobile products, including Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 10 Mobile Enterprise," Microsoft declared.

Microsoft Traps, Surveillance, and Openwashing

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Microsoft
  • Ockam provides easy to deploy identity, trust, and interoperability for IoT developers [Ed: Ockam is Azure surveillance.]
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Ockam [Ed: Ockam is connected to the NSA surveillance complex through Microsoft (their “dedicated technical partner”), so it's hardly surprising SD Times promotes this given its history.]
  • How to Install MS SQL on Ubuntu Server 18.04 [Ed: Jack Wallen explains how to install proprietary malware on Ubuntu; this Microsoft blob doesn't even run on GNU/Linux but on DrawBridge (also proprietary)]
  • Should Construction Become Open-Source?
  • How open source software took over the world [iophk: "article full of mistakes"]

    While the products of these Gen 3 companies are definitely more tightly controlled by the host companies, the open source community still plays a pivotal role in the creation and development of the open source projects. For one, the community still discovers the most innovative and relevant projects. They star the projects on Github, download the software in order to try it, and evangelize what they perceive to be the better project so that others can benefit from great software. Much like how a good blog post or a tweet spreads virally, great open source software leverages network effects. It is the community that is the source of promotion for that virality.

  • A EULA in FOSS clothing?

    Now, what Jay said is true to a degree in that (as with many different kind of expression), software has code specific to it; this can be found in 17 U.S.C. § 117. But the fact that Jay also made reference to digital books was odd; digital books really have nothing to do with software (or not any more so than any other kind of creative expression). That said, digital books and proprietary software do actually share one thing in common, though it’s horrifying: in both cases their creators have maintained that you don’t actually own the copy you paid for. That is, unlike a book, you don’t actually buy a copy of a digital book, you merely acquire a license to use their book under their terms. But how do they do this? Because when you access the digital book, you click “agree” on a license — an End User License Agreement (EULA) — that makes clear that you don’t actually own anything. The exact language varies; take (for example) VMware’s end user license agreement:
    [...]

Microsoft Will Forcibly Delete Files

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Microsoft
  • Windows 10 Will Reserve 7GB Storage Before Installing An Update

    With Windows 19H1, all unnecessary files will move towards the reserved storage to pave the way for the new Windows feature update. This will also automate the task of cleaning desktop before getting a new update.

  • Windows 10 Will Soon “Reserve” 7 GB of Your Storage for Updates [Ed: That space could instead be used to install GNU/Linux for free]

    Windows Updates need a lot of disk space, which is a problem on devices with small amounts of internal storage. Microsoft is fixing this by “reserving” some disk space for updates in the next version of Windows 10, codenamed 19H1.

    Microsoft has been pushing cheap laptops with small hard drives for years now. But anyone who has ever used one has quickly run into a major issue: They usually don’t have enough storage left over to install major updates. This leaves them without important patches, security fixes, and new features. While you shouldn’t update to the latest version of Windows on the first day, you do want to eventually get there. So this is a serious problem.

  • Excuse me, sir. You can't store your things there. Those 7 gigabytes are reserved for Windows 10

    Microsoft has announced that it is formalising the arrangement whereby Windows 10 inexplicably swipes a chunk of disk space for its own purposes in the form of Reserved Storage.

    The theory goes like this – temporary files get generated all the time in Windows, either by the OS or apps running on the thing. As a user's disk fills up, things start getting sticky as space for this flighty data becomes short and reliability suffers.

    Microsoft has tried a few ways over the years to help users manage disk space – Windows will start to whinge as disks reach capacity and built-in tools exist to clear unwanted files. The latest, Storage Sense, will quietly "dehydrate" OneDrive files to free up space.

Openwashing Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
Microsoft
OSS
  • Could the rise of open source be the key to wider DevOps adoption?

    Alongside excitement and surprise, both deals have sparked some trepidation and worries in the developer community. With some of the biggest stewards of open source now under the umbrella of big tech, will the basic tenants of the movement be put at risk? What independent organizations might take up the mantle?

    Five years ago, these acquisitions might have been more worrisome, but big companies today understand the importance of open source, Sijbrandij said.

    The acquisition of Red Hat, the largest software company acquisition in history, brought no proprietary source code to IBM. Big Blue knows "they have to be a great steward, because they didn't buy it for the [intellectual property] because there is no IP," he said.

  • Should open leaders expect to have privacy? [Ed: Red Hat's site composed by Microsoft with the typical openwashing of companies]

    As an open leader, I share because I want to be inclusive. In my moment of sharing, I set the example for others to donate their stories so we can be a more fully realized, creative group.

    Sound too touchy feely for you? Think about a time when you feel like you're doing your best work. I bet your best work occurs when you're connecting with and learning from others. These feelings stem from open leaders' desire to create inclusive teams.

    The word "inclusive" is the key word here, as I do not want to inadvertently exclude or marginalize anyone by sharing something private. I value the different perspectives and habits people bring to interactions, so I don't want something I post or share online to quiet others and prevent more sharing in the future. Instead, I want people to feel like they're learning something from what I share.

  • Using a local NuGet server with Red Hat OpenShift [Ed: Red Hat is pushing .NOT on behalf of Microsoft]
  • LeddarTech Joins Baidu’s Apollo Autonomous Driving Open Platform

Vigilance

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

It is getting harder to write this column. I used to have a ready supply of topics, with all the outrageous things that were happening to Linux: Microsoft's disinformation, SCO's lawsuit, patent licenses, the Novell/Microsoft pact – big things that threatened the very existence of the Linux community.

Dear Reader,

It is getting harder to write this column. I used to have a ready supply of topics, with all the outrageous things that were happening to Linux: Microsoft's disinformation, SCO's lawsuit, patent licenses, the Novell/Microsoft pact – big things that threatened the very existence of the Linux community.

I was trying to think up a new topic today, and it occurred to me that there used to be way more in the news on an average day that could rile up a Linux guy. That's the good news, because Linux is in a safer place and is no longer faced with the threat of imminent destruction. Microsoft is playing nice (sort of); SCO has collapsed under the weight of its own imagination deficit. But are we really walking on easy street now? Surely some other threats must be out there? Are there still factors that are threatening the livelihood of the Linux community, and if so, what are they?

Read more

Microsoft Breaks Windows, Openwashes Questionable Encryption and Uses Money to Rope in Bakkt

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Microsoft

How to Run a Different OS Without Buying a New Computer

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

If you’re running Windows and adding Linux in a dual-boot setup, the Linux installer should include tools for partitioning your main hard drive—just make sure you choose to install Linux alongside Windows. You’ll also need to create a Linux installer on a CD, DVD, or USB drive first, then boot from that: There’s an official guide for doing this with Ubuntu here, for example.

If you need another tool, search for the Disk Management utility from the Windows Start menu: Here you can view, edit, and manage disk partitions. One of the disadvantages of this method is that the process is more complicated to reverse if you change your mind.

Alternatively, you can skip the partition and install a second hard drive inside your machine—provided you’re running a desktop computer and have the space. The process isn’t particularly difficult—YouTube is packed with tutorials—but it is more of a serious undertaking than just splitting your current hard drive into two with a few mouse clicks. You have to actually crack open your computer and install the additional drive, as well as much around in the BIOS for your motherboard to confirm the drive is installed correctly to function as a boot drive.

But if that’s still too daunting don’t worry. There’s another way to get operating systems on your computer without partitioning drives (and running the risk of losing data) or installing entirely new drives.

Read more

Microsoft Windows Killed by Browsers

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
Web
  • This Chrome Bug Can Freeze Your Windows PC With 100% Disk Usage

    Google Chrome is already known for slowing down computers, ultimately leading to 100% disk usage. On top of that, we now have a new bug that can actually freeze our Windows 10 PC.

    The newly discovered tech support scam causes Google Chrome to use 100% disk in an instant. The bug uses a JavaScript code to create a loop, making it impossible to close the tab or the browser.

  • A Recent IE Patch is Causing Windows to Fail While Booting on Some Lenovo Laptops [Ed: When you just patch a browser and the whole operating system collapses]

    Microsoft has seen its share of issues as of late, and now a seemingly simple patch is causing serious issues to certain laptops running the 2016 Anniversary Update. The update was originally released to prevent a zero-day attack on IE.

Openwashing and FUD Leftovers

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
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More in Tux Machines

Essential System Tools: nmon – Curses based Performance Monitor

This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at nmon, a free and open source performance monitor. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table at the summary page of this article. Nmon is short for “Nigel’s Monitor”. It’s a systems administrator, tuner, and benchmark all wrapped up in an easy-to-use tool. The utility displays performance information on the CPU, memory, network, disks (mini graphs or numbers), filesystems, NFS, top processes, resources (Linux version & processors) and more. The software aims to be as frugal as possible, as it’s self-defeating for a performance monitor to consume large chunks of CPU cycles and memory. Read more

Programming: Node.js, Micro:bit, L4Re, Python, Go and More

  • 14 Best NodeJS Frameworks for Developers in 2019
    Node.js is used to build fast, highly scalable network applications based on an event-driven non-blocking input/output model, single-threaded asynchronous programming. A web application framework is a combination of libraries, helpers, and tools that provide a way to effortlessly build and run web applications. A web framework lays out a foundation for building a web site/app. The most important aspects of a web framework are – its architecture and features (such as support for customization, flexibility, extensibility, security, compatibility with other libraries, etc..).
  • Debian now got everything you need to program Micro:bit
    I am amazed and very pleased to discover that since a few days ago, everything you need to program the BBC micro:bit is available from the Debian archive. All this is thanks to the hard work of Nick Morrott and the Debian python packaging team. The micro:bit project recommend the mu-editor to program the microcomputer, as this editor will take care of all the machinery required to injekt/flash micropython alongside the program into the micro:bit, as long as the pieces are available. There are three main pieces involved. The first to enter Debian was python-uflash, which was accepted into the archive 2019-01-12. The next one was mu-editor, which showed up 2019-01-13. The final and hardest part to to into the archive was firmware-microbit-micropython, which needed to get its build system and dependencies into Debian before it was accepted 2019-01-20. The last one is already in Debian Unstable and should enter Debian Testing / Buster in three days. This all allow any user of the micro:bit to get going by simply running 'apt install mu-editor' when using Testing or Unstable, and once Buster is released as stable, all the users of Debian stable will be catered for.
  • Some Ideas for 2019
    Well, after my last article moaning about having wishes and goals while ignoring the preconditions for, and contributing factors in, the realisation of such wishes and goals, I thought I might as well be constructive and post some ideas I could imagine working on this year. It would be a bonus to get paid to work on such things, but I don’t hold out too much hope in that regard. In a way, this is to make up for not writing an article summarising what I managed to look at in 2018. But then again, it can be a bit wearing to have to read through people’s catalogues of work even if I do try and make my own more approachable and not just list tons of work items, which is what one tends to see on a monthly basis in other channels. In any case, 2018 saw a fair amount of personal focus on the L4Re ecosystem, as one can tell from looking at my article history. Having dabbled with L4Re and Fiasco.OC a bit in 2017 with the MIPS Creator CI20, I finally confronted certain aspects of the software and got it working on various devices, which had been something of an ambition for at least a couple of years. I also got back into looking at PIC32 hardware and software experiments, tidying up and building on earlier work, and I keep nudging along my Python-like language and toolchain, Lichen. Anyway, here are a few ideas I have been having for supporting a general strategy of building flexible, sustainable and secure computing environments that respect the end-user. Such respect not being limited to software freedom, but also extending to things like privacy, affordability and longevity that are often disregarded in the narrow focus on only one set of end-user rights.
  • 5 Best Python IDEs You Can Get in 2019
    If you’re taking Python lessons online, you will eventually need a good IDE (Integrated Development Environment) to write better code. The command line interface can only prove so useful. At Python.com you can download a native IDE called IDLE (Integrated Development and Learning Environment). However, it is rather basic in scope, and debugging can consume more time than necessary. With this in mind, here are a few of the best IDEs for Python which add to your productivity.
  • Python’s Requests Library (Guide)
  • Factorial one-liner using reduce and mul for Python 2 and 3
  • Sample Chapters from Creating wxPython Applications Book
  • Migrating from Pelican 3 to Pelican 4
  • Python Software Foundation Fellow Members for Q4 2018 [Ed: Python Software Foundation has many Microsoft employees in it now. Not good. Microsoft has been using money to filtrate just about everything, including its competition. This isn't so new a strategy and many examples of it exist.]
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #352 (Jan. 22, 2019)
  • Why Don't People Use Formal Methods?

    Before we begin, we need to lay down some terms. There really isn’t a formal methods community so much as a few tiny bands foraging in the Steppe.1 This means different groups use terms in different ways. Very broadly, there are two domains in FM: formal specification is the study of how we write precise, unambiguous specifications, and formal verification is the study of how we prove things are correct. But “things” includes both code and abstract systems. Not only do we use separate means of specifying both things, we often use different means to verify them, too. To make things even more confusing, if somebody says they do formal specification, they usually mean they both specify and verify systems, and if somebody says they do formal verification, they usually mean mean they both specify and verify code.

    Before we begin, we need to lay down some terms. There really isn’t a formal methods community so much as a few tiny bands foraging in the Steppe.1 This means different groups use terms in different ways. Very broadly, there are two domains in FM: formal specification is the study of how we write precise, unambiguous specifications, and formal verification is the study of how we prove things are correct. But “things” includes both code and abstract systems. Not only do we use separate means of specifying both things, we often use different means to verify them, too. To make things even more confusing, if somebody says they do formal specification, they usually mean they both specify and verify systems, and if somebody says they do formal verification, they usually mean mean they both specify and verify code. For clarity purposes, I will divide verification into code verification (CV) and design verification (DV), and similarly divide specification into CS and DS. These are not terms used in the wider FM world. We’ll start by talking about CS and CV, then move on to DS and DV.

  • Learning C as an uneducated hobbyist

    V=Programming, however, is conscious. It’s an activity in which you have to think in order to act. Unlearning bad practice in programming takes no energy at all apart from that spent being told that the practice is bad and coming to understand and remember it. Once you’ve done that, it’s almost impossible to make the same mistake again.

    That’s why you shouldn’t be afraid of learning “along the way”, “as you go” or “in an ad-hoc manner” because “you might learn bad practice”. If you learn the wrong thing, you can learn the right thing later. After all, you’re not a professional programmer. It doesn’t matter very much if you make a mistake; your job doesn’t depend on it.

  • Demystifying Pointers in Go
    If you’ve never worked with a language that exposes pointers, it could be a little confusing. But the good news is pointers don’t need to be scary. In fact, pointers can be pretty straightforward. Here are the basics of pointers in Go:

GNOME 3.32 Desktop Environment to Launch with a "Radical New Icon Style"

Besides the slightly revamped default theme, it looks like the GNOME 3.32 desktop environment will come with a "radical new icon style," along with new guidelines for app developers to provide a more unified icon style across the GNOME ecosystem. GNOME designer Jakub Steiner writes in his latest blog article about the improvements needed for the revamped icon style to be included by default with the GNOME 3.32 release of the open-source desktop environment used by numerous Linux-based operating systems, including Ubuntu. Read more Also: GNOME Is Making Great Progress On Overhauling Their App Icons

Dell XPS 13 9380 Developer Edition Now Available, Shipping With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Dell is now shipping their new XPS 13 8th gen (9380) laptop in a developer edition that comes preloaded with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. The Dell XPS 9380 is only an incremental upgrade over the previous-generation 9370: it has the slightly newer Intel Whiskey Lake processors, moves the web camera position to the top of the display rather than at the bottom, and other minor refinements but nothing too dramatic. From the Developer Edition side, they have moved from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS to 18.04 LTS. Read more Also: The new Dell XPS 13 developer edition now available in the US, Europe and Canada New Dell XPS 13 Laptop with Ubuntu Is Now Available in the US, Europe and Canada