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Microsoft

Microsoft’s failed attempt on Debian packaging

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Microsoft
Debian

I dared to download and play around with the files, only to get shocked how incompetent Microsoft is in packaging.

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Also: Tails 3.7.1 Linux Distribution Released | Brings Tor Browser to 7.5.5 and Security Updates

Observing and Replacing GitHub

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Development
Microsoft
  • GitHub’s New CEO Did a Reddit AMA, This is What he Said

    There is a growing concern that Microsoft may seek to bloat the service with add-ons, feature creep, and integrations with their own services, like Azure and LinkedIn.

    Is that likely?

  • 5 Github Alternatives

    Although GitHub is the most used platform for storing open source projects on the Internet but being acquired by Microsoft, the open source community may like to prefer the alternatives. So we have other very interesting options that we recommend to know in order to decide which one to publish and store your own creations and adaptations in the cloud.

  • Three Takes On Microsoft Acquiring Github

    But, as someone who believes in the value of reinvention and innovation among the tech industry, it's not necessarily great to see successful mid-tier companies just gobbled up by giants. It happens -- and perhaps it clears the field for something fresh and new. Perhaps it even clears the field for that utopic git-driven world that Ford envisions. But, in the present-tense, it's at least a bit deflating to think that a very different, and very powerful, approach to the way people collaborate and code... ends up in Microsoft's universe.

    And, as a final note on these three pieces: this is why we should seek out and promote people who actually understand technology and business in understanding what is happening in the technology world. The Guardian piece is laughable, because it appears to be written by someone with such a surface-level understanding of open source of free software that it comes off as utter nonsense. But the pieces by Ford and Thompson actually help add to our understanding of the news, while providing insightful takes on it. The Guardian (and others) should learn from that.

  • Mailing lists vs Github

    The alternative method is the developer mailing list. It arose in the late eighties to early nineties, and predates the popularity of the web browser. But far from being a mere historical curiosity, the discussion list is still the primary method of development in many important open source projects, from databases to operating systems to web browsers.

    In this article I’ll carefully compare the use of mailing lists with code collaboration web sites such as Github. I’ll do my best to present the pros and cons of each, so that projects assessing the two can make an informed decision.

Microsoft's and Apple's Lies About Free/Open Source Software

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Microsoft
Mac

GNOMEs beat Microsoft: Git Virtual File System to get a new name

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Microsoft
GNOME

Microsoft is going to rename the Git Virtual File System to eliminate its clash with GNOMErs.

The purpose of the Git Virtual File System was laudable: Redmond's developers were sick of taking the afternoon off after typing “git clone” (even “git checkout” could take hours), so they gave GitHub users a workaround.

At the time, Microsoft's Saeed Noursalehi explained that GVFS “virtualises the file system beneath your repo and makes it appear as though all the files in your repo are present, but in reality only downloads a file the first time it is opened.”

At last, developers could handle terabyte-size repos without taking up knitting.

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GitHub to be Run by People Who Killed Novell, RoboVM and More (the Mono Entryism)

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Microsoft
OSS
  • De Icaza links make Friedman wrong choice to head GitHub [Ed: De Icaza played a very major role in the Microsoft-Novell patent deal that eventually killed Novell]

    If Microsoft thought that selecting Nat Friedman to head its new acquisition, GitHub, would help burnish its open-source credentials, then it has made a big mistake.

    Members of the free and open source software community have very long memories and the contribution made by Friedman and his great friend and business partner, Miguel de Icaza, now also an employee of Microsoft, to numerous incidents many years ago that split the community have not been forgotten.

    For those who have been hiding under a rock, Microsoft on Monday (US time) announced that it was buying GitHub for for US$7.5 billion (A$9.79 billion) in Microsoft stock.

  • GitLab Ultimate and Gold now free for education and open source

    It has been a crazy 24 hours for GitLab. More than 2,000 people tweeted about #movingtogitlab. We imported over 100,000 repositories, and we've seen a 7x increase in orders. We went live on Bloomberg TV. And on top of that, Apple announced an Xcode integration with GitLab.

The GitHub Exodus: Linux/FOSS Does Not Love Microsoft

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Development
Microsoft
  • A Bright Future with GitHub? Microsoft muscles in

    GitLab reported that 13,000 projects moved from GitHub to GitLab on the day of Microsoft’s acquisition announcement. That’s, of course, a small drop in the ocean compared to the 80 million projects currently hosted on GitHub.

  • Blockchain Developers Abandon Github Following Microsoft Acquisition

    Microsoft’s acquisition of open source code repository Github has provoked protest from members of the crypto community. Developers of bitcoin core and other blockchains have expressed disquiet at the corporate takeover, with several stating their intent to migrate to an alternative platform at the earliest possible convenience.

  • Peer Mountain Joins the Largest Open-Source Blockchain Initiative, Enterprise Ethereum Alliance

    Peer Mountain has announced that it has joined the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA), the world’s largest open-source blockchain initiative. The move introduces Peer Mountain to collaborate with thought leaders across several industries, as well as providing access to a number of resources. Working with other members of the EEA will allow Peer Mountain to reinforce its capability to address enterprise use cases.

No Love for Microsoft in GitHub

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Development
Microsoft

​What Microsoft buying GitHub means to open-source software development

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Microsoft
OSS

Roy Schestowitz, editor of the anti-Microsoft and software patent site, TechRights tweeted, "Microsoft is a saboteur whose sabotage relies on lies about 'love.'" He also claims "Git hosts other than #github getting 10 times the usual load (surge) as people migrate away from GitHub."

Indeed, Gitlab, a leading GitHub competitor, reports: "We're seeing 10x the normal daily amount of repositories." This is being driven not just because of old grudges against Microsoft, but because, as one Reddit writer put it, under Microsoft GitHub's "real future is a buggy and monetized site."

Nadella may say, "We recognize the responsibility we take on with this agreement. We are committed to being stewards of the GitHub community, which will retain its developer-first ethos, operate independently, and remain an open platform."

But, some very vocal developers don't buy that for a New York minute. They are certain that Microsoft will "Embrace, extend, and extinguish" the programs of potential rivals. As one put it on a Google+ thread, "What does M$ have to gain from this, other than by either shutting it down in the long term, monetizing it further or by data mining folks? In just a matter of hours, they made GitHub a completely toxic entity."

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Louis-Philippe Véronneau: Let's migrate away from GitHub

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Microsoft

Some people might be fine with Microsoft's takeover, but to me it's the straw that brakes the camel's back. For a few years now, MS has been running a large marketing campaign on how they love Linux and suddenly decided to embrace Free Software in all of its forms. More like MS BS to me.

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Microsoft 'Loves' FOSS

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Microsoft
OSS
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More in Tux Machines

Server: GNU/Linux Dominance in Supercomputers, Windows Dominance in Downtime

  • Five Supercomputers That Aren't Supercomputers
    A supercomputer, of course, isn't really a "computer." It's not one giant processor sitting atop an even larger motherboard. Instead, it's a network of thousands of computers tied together to form a single whole, dedicated to a singular set of tasks. They tend to be really fast, but according to the folks at the International Supercomputing Conference, speed is not a prerequisite for being a supercomputer. But speed does help them process tons of data quickly to help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. Summit, for example, is already booked for things such as cancer research; energy research, to model a fusion reactor and its magnetically confined plasma tohasten commercial development of fusion energy; and medical research using AI, centering around identifying patterns in the function and evolution of human proteins and cellular systems to increase understanding of Alzheimer’s, heart disease, or addiction, and to inform the drug discovery process.
  • Office 365 is suffering widespread borkage across Blighty
     

    Some users are complaining that O365 is "completely unusable" with others are reporting a noticeable slowdown, whinging that it's taking 30 minutes to send and receive emails.  

Google: VR180, Android and the Asus Chromebook Flip C101

Security Leftovers

  • Hackers May Have Already Defeated Apple’s USB Restricted Mode For iPhone
    Recently, the iPhone-maker announced a security feature to prevent unauthorized cracking of iPhones. When the device isn’t unlocked for an hour, the Lightning port can be used for nothing but charging. The feature is a part of the iOS 12 update, which is expected to launch later this month.
  • Cops Are Confident iPhone Hackers Have Found a Workaround to Apple’s New Security Feature
    Apple confirmed to The New York Times Wednesday it was going to introduce a new security feature, first reported by Motherboard. USB Restricted Mode, as the new feature is called, essentially turns the iPhone’s lightning cable port into a charge-only interface if someone hasn’t unlocked the device with its passcode within the last hour, meaning phone forensic tools shouldn’t be able to unlock phones. Naturally, this feature has sent waves throughout the mobile phone forensics and law enforcement communities, as accessing iPhones may now be substantially harder, with investigators having to rush a seized phone to an unlocking device as quickly as possible. That includes GrayKey, a relatively new and increasingly popular iPhone cracking tool. But forensics experts suggest that Grayshift, the company behind the tech, is not giving up yet.
  • How Secure Are Wi-Fi Security Cameras?
  • Trump-Kim Meeting Was a Magnet For Russian Cyberattacks

KDE: Usability and Productivity initiative, Kraft and Konsole

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 23
    This has been a bit of a light week for KDE’s Usability and Productivity initiative, probably because everyone’s basking in the warm glow of a well-received release: KDE Plasma 5.13 came out on Tuesday and is getting great reviews!
  • Kraft Version 0.81 Released
    I am happy to announce the release of Kraft version 0.81. Kraft is a Qt based desktop application that helps you to handle documents like quotes and invoices in your small business. Version 0.81 is a bugfix release for the previous version 0.80, which was the first stable release based on Qt5 and KDE Frameworks5. Even though it came with way more new features than just the port, it’s first release has proven it’s stability in day-to-day business now for a few month.
  • Giving Konsole some love
    I started to hack in Konsole, and first I was afraid, I was petrified. You know, touching those hardcore apps that are the center of the KDE Software Collection. I started touching it mostly because some easy to fix bugs weren’t fixed, and as every cool user knows, this is free software. So I could pay for someone to fix my bugs, or I could download the source code and try to figure out what the hell was wrong with it. I choosed the second approach.