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Microsoft

Microsoft E.E.E.: Some of the Latest

Filed under
Microsoft

It's time for Microsoft to give up on Windows Phone and switch to Android

Filed under
Android
Microsoft

Windows Phone has all but died on the vine, and with less than 2 percent market share, it is unlikely to gain any new ground given the pummeling it is receiving from the twin mobile titans of iOS and Android.

But one of those foes actually offers Microsoft a possible lifeline, and a way to make a bigger impact in the mobile space. It's time for Microsoft to dump Windows Phone and start making Android smartphones.

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GNU/kWindows

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • GNU/kWindows

    There has been a lot of talk lately about a most unique combination: GNU—the fully free/libre operating system—and Microsoft Windows—the freedom-denying, user-controlling, surveillance system. There has also been a great deal of misinformation. I’d like to share my thoughts.

    [...]

    Free software is absolutely essential: it ensures that users, who are the most vulnerable, are in control of their computing—not software developers or corporations. Any program that denies users any one of their four freedoms is non-free (or proprietary)—that is, freedom-denying software. This means that any non-free software, no matter its features or performance, will always be inferior to free software that performs a similar task.

    Not everyone likes talking about freedom or the free software philosophy. This disagreement resulted in the “open source” development methodology, which exists to sell the benefits of free software to businesses without discussing the essential ideological considerations. Under the “open source” philosophy, if a non-free program provides better features or performance, then surely it must be “better”, because they have outperformed the “open source” development methodology; non-free software isn’t always considered to be a bad thing.

    [...]

    Secondly, when you see someone using a GNU/kWindows system, politely ask them why. Tell them that there is a better operating system out there—the GNU/Linux operating system—that not only provides those technical features, but also provides the feature of freedom! Tell them what free software is, and try to relate it to them so that they understand why it is important, and even practical.

    It’s good to see more people benefiting from GNU; but we can’t be happy when it is being sold as a means to draw users into an otherwise proprietary surveillance system, without so much as a mention of our name, or what it is that we stand for.

  • Good bye “open source”; hello “free software”

    Everyone has at least a good reason to prefer software freedom over non-free software products.

Some Early Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux Vulkan Tests With NVIDIA Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Microsoft

For this early comparison were the recent results I did of OpenGL and Vulkan on Ubuntu using The Talos Principle. Those tests were two weeks ago with the NVIDIA 364.12 driver on Ubuntu 16.04 with the Linux 4.4 kernel. The system used for this old and new testing was the same Intel Xeon E3-1280 v5 Skylake box with MSI C236A Workstation motherboard, 16GB of DDR4-2133MHz memory, and 120GB Samsung 850 SSD. With today's Windows 10 Pro x64 tests, the NVIDIA 364.72 driver was at play.

[...]

With regard to the Vulkan performance between Windwos 10 and Ubuntu 16.04, while both were using the NVIDIA 364 series driver, the Linux results on all three graphics cards were noticeably faster! Quite interesting considering that usually the NVIDIA graphics performance is close to each other under Windows and Linux, at least from past OpenGL comparisons. But again, this was just some very initial testing done today.

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Also: Vulkan 1.0.9 Specification Released

Microsoft Neglects Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft Loves Neglects Linux

Ubuntu on Windows - The good, the bad and the just plain weird

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Microsoft
Ubuntu

Bad Thing #1 – It's not open source

That's right. The software for running Ubuntu Linux's userland applications on Windows is, at least as of this writing, closed source.

That just plain stinks. Hopefully this gets remedied quickly. It's early enough that I'm willing to give the team behind this the benefit of the doubt that, by the time there is an official public release, there will be source code available under a reasonable license.

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Maybe it’s time to trust Microsoft. Maybe not.

Filed under
Microsoft

Is this truly a changed Microsoft? Personally, I don’t believe it is. The day they stop this silly 235 patent BS, then we might talk about it. But you know as well as I do, if they pull the covers back on their lie-of-the-century, then they may stand to lose billions in paying back those companies they extorted in the past.

“Oh those patents. Yeah, that was silly wasn’t it. Well, we’re sorry your company lost share holder value due to having to pay us all that money. But let’s just let bygones be bygones…whaddaya say?

Stick it all up in your bygones Microsoft. You’re a liar and a thief and the only reason most of your higher execs aren’t in prison is that U.S. law and your good ol’ boy network protected you. You aren’t fooling anyone. You don’t love Linux any more than I love liver and onions. You have merely realized that the only way you are going to survive into the next decade is to integrate Linux into your strategies…and integrate it deeply.

Let’s face it. You need us. More than we need you.

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Proprietary Software

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Microsoft
  • Skype For Linux: Dead? Or Just Resting? [Ed: Microsoft never added GNU/Linux support to Skype but merely inherited it when NSA/Microsoft took over, then phased it out, over time]

    Last month many users reported that Microsoft had broken the app's ability to join calls. Two Linux enthusiasts penned the issue in a blog signed by "lots of angry Linux users." I have contacted Microsoft numerous times over the past few weeks but it remains tight-lipped on the matter. I have a feeling Microsoft isn't going to update Skype for Linux.

  • Vivaldi – A Modern Web Browser for Next Generation Internet Browsing

    Vivaldi is a Chromium/Blink engine based web browser with very appealing interface. The browser is tab based thus allowing user to open multiple tabs and switch between them using input devices. The browser is designed to fit all the open tabs in one windows.

I hate Microsoft Office

Filed under
Microsoft

Here's an example: The icon to delete emails in Outlook is a swooshy "χ" icon. That seems out of step with the smooth appearance that Microsoft seems to prefer. The swooshy "χ" is probably supposed to make Office look cool, but to me it just looks old. Like, that was a neat idea in the 1990s or early 2000s, but today that's just clutter.

The rest of Office just seems confusing and overwrought. I have a hard time using it. I've been using Microsoft Office for three months, and only recently did I discover that I can cancel out of previewing an attachment in Outlook. Seriously, all this time I've been clicking into other emails just to exit out of the attachment preview mode.

Yeah, the usability in Microsoft Office is weird.

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Wine 1.9.7

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Red Hat News

Linux Devices

Leftovers: OSS

  • Quantifying Benefits of Network Virtualization in the Data Center
    Modern data centers have increased significantly in scale and complexity as compute and storage resources become highly virtualized. The rise of the DevOps style of application deployment means that data center resources must be agile and respond rapidly to changing workload requirements. Data center network technologies have been challenged to keep up with these rapidly evolving application requirements.
  • Apache Zeppelin Joins Several Other Projects Gaining Top-Level Status
    As we've been reporting, The Apache Software Foundation, which incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, has been elevating a lot of interesting new tools to Top-Level Status recently. The foundation has also made clear that you can expect more on this front, as graduating projects to Top-Level Status helps them get both advanced stewardship and certainly far more contributions. Only a few days ago, the foundation announced that a project called TinkerPop has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). TinkerPop is a graph computing framework that provides developers the tools required to build modern graph applications in any application domain and at any scale. Now, it has announced that Apache Zeppelin has graduated as well. Zeppelin is a web-based notebook that enables interactive data analytics.
  • 6 Open Source Operating Systems for the Internet of Things (IoT)
    Whether you are small to large enterprises, IoT is one of the useful technology that can help you to be connected on-the-go.
  • 6 open source architecture projects to check out
    The world of architecture doesn't change as quickly as software, but architects are still finding new ways to share innovative designs and ideas. The open source architecture movement aims to make architectural designs, drawings, 3D renderings, and documentation freely available for integration into other projects under open source licenses. It owes much of its growth to the growing popularity of the maker movement, DIY culture, 3D printing, and CNC machines, as well as support from architects like Alejandro Aravana.
  • Yorubaname.com has gone opensource, codebase now on GitHub
    Online dictionary for yoruba names, YorubaName, has now made its backlog accessible to the public. In a post on their blog, the guys at YorubaName announced that the website codebase is now on GitHub.
  • A New Version of Rust Hits the Streets
    Version 1.9 of the Rust programming language has been released. Rust is a new language with a small but enthusiastic community of developers.
  • Here's how you can make a career in OpenStack
    OpenStack is one of the biggest open source movements. It is a free and open-source software platform for cloud computing, mostly deployed as an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS). The software platform consists of interrelated components that control hardware pools of processing, storage, and networking resources throughout a data centre. According to the official website, hundreds of the world's largest brands rely on OpenStack to run their businesses every day, reducing costs and helping them move faster. OpenStack has a strong ecosystem globally.
  • Compatibility before purity: Microsoft tweaks .NET Core again [Ed: Microsoft lied about .NET going Open Source; just forked it into Open Core version]
    Microsoft's open source fork of the .NET platform, called .NET Core, will be modified for better compatibility with existing applications, says Program Manager Immo Landwerth in a recent post.
  • EMC Ships Open Source Tool for Cloud and IoT Devices
  • Watch Benjamin Hindman Co-Creator of Apache Mesos Speak Live Tomorrow at MesosCon [Ed: Microsoft proxy in a sense]
  • MesosCon Preview: Q&A with Twitter’s Chris Pinkham
  • How to secure your open source code [Ed: more marketing nonsense of Black Duck]
  • Luxembourg launches open data portal
    The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg officially launched its national open data portal data.public.lu on April 8th. This portal, supported by Digital Luxembourg, the government agency in charge of digital affairs in the country, was presented during the Game of Code hackathon.
  • Denmark to accelerate government digitisation
    Open standards The existing shared solutions are to be adopted by all authorities and public sector institutions where relevant, according to a presentation in English. “Shared solutions need to be stable, secure and user-friendly, they will also be easy to implement because the infrastructure is based on open standards.” The strategy, an agreement involving the government, regions and municipalities, was announced on 12 May. It includes 33 initiatives, which among other things deal with ease of use, reuse of data, IT architecture, growth, security and digital skills, DIGST says.