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Microsoft

Former Munich Mayor Warns Against Negative Effects Of City’s Re-Migration To Microsoft

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The former mayor of Munich, Christian Ude (Social Democratic Party), clashed with the new head of IT of the Bavarian capital over the city’s re-migration from Linux to Microsoft at an event organised by the Green Party yesterday.

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Google Support for GNU/Linux, Microsoft Walks Away From Windows Users

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
  • Acer Chromebook 13 and Chromebook Spin 13 to support Linux apps out of the box

    Along with a host of other high-end devices from other brands, the Acer Chromebook 13 and Chromebook Spin 13 will support Linux apps at launch, according to a recent Chromium commit. Google has been working with a number of device makers on a new range of high-end Chromebooks with enterprise features. Nami is the umbrella codename for these devices.

  • Acer Chromebook 13 & Chromebook Spin 13 will apparently support Linux apps at launch

    Acer is one of the bigger players in the Chrome OS market, and last month the company debuted two new exciting laptops in the Chromebook 13 and Chromebook Spin 13. Now we’re finding out that these machines will apparently support Linux apps out of the box.

  • Microsoft will stop offering forum support for Windows 7, 8.1, RT, and more

    rom next month, the company will cease to operate forum support for Windows 7, Windows 8.1, Windows RT, Microsoft Security Essentials, Internet Explorer 10 and Office 2010 and 2013.

    Also being stopped is support for Surface Pro, Surface Pro 2, Surface RT, Surface 2, the Microsoft Band and (at long last) Zune.

  • Microsoft to stop offering support for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 in forums

    On the software front, the company says that it will also no longer provide support for Microsoft Security Essentials, Internet Explorer 10, Office 2010 and 2013 as of July. It is not just software that is affected. Microsoft is also stopping support for Surface Pro, Surface Pro 2, Surface RT, Surface 2, Microsoft Band and Zune. Some forums will be locked, preventing users from helping each other as well.

Winepak Could Make it Easier to Install Windows Apps on Linux

Filed under
Microsoft
Software

It might soon be easier to install your favourite Windows apps on Linux, thanks to a fledgling new project.

It’s called Winepak and, as you might guess from the name, it’s focused on packaging Wine applications as Flatpak bundles for faster, fuss-free use.

So, rather than you having to head out and find, installer, open it with Wine, and jog through the various steps needed to install it correctly you’d simply install an application from Winepak.

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Openwashing and Entryism by Facebook and Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
  • Facebook releases Sonar debugging tool to the open source community
  • Facebook open sources Sonar

    Facebook has announced it will be open sourcing its extensible debugging tool: Sonar. Sonar was originally created to help Facebook engineers manage the complexity of working with multiple different modules.

    According to the company, Sonar provides a framework where experts and developers can convey important information to users. It also provides engineers with an intuitive way for inspecting and understanding the structure and behavior of iOS and Android applications.

    When it was started three years ago, Sonar was built upon Stetho, which is an Android debugging bridge built in Chrome’s developer tools. It added new features, provided a richer user experience, and works across both iOS and Android. Facebook recommends the use of Sonar over Stetho for most use cases going forward.

  • Linux Foundation: Microsoft buying GitHub is 'good news' for open source, here's why [Ed: Maybe Zemlin will get a Microsoft job one day.]
  • Closed Source and Ethics: Good, Bad, Or Ugly? [iophk: "Jono is sure milking his earlier accidental appointment as Canonical's spinmeister to promote Microsoft."]

    A little while ago I had a discussion with someone who was grumbling about Microsoft. After poking around his opinion, what shook out was that his real issue was not with Microsoft’s open source work (he was supportive of this), but it was with the fact that they still produce proprietary software and use software patents in departments such as Windows and Office.

    Put bluntly, he believed Microsoft are ethically unfit as a company because of these reasons, and these reasons were significant enough to diminish their open source work almost entirely.

  • Why You Should Use Windows Subsystem for Linux [Ed: Microsoft-connected site says, as in this case, something along the lines of use GNU/Linux only as an 'app' for Vista 10]
  • What Microsoft's GitHub Deal Promises to Programmers [Ed: "Business Over Religion" says a section as if software freedom is superstition and we should submit to the business objectives of Microsoft]
  • Proposed Microsoft-GitHub buy confirms open source role in cloud [Ed: "Microsoft has not always been about the developer," it says. It still isn't. This it why it bribes officials, blackmails executives, lies  and cheats (to this date). Don't believe the PR campaign.]

Microsoft’s failed attempt on Debian packaging

Filed under
Microsoft
Debian

I dared to download and play around with the files, only to get shocked how incompetent Microsoft is in packaging.

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Also: Tails 3.7.1 Linux Distribution Released | Brings Tor Browser to 7.5.5 and Security Updates

Observing and Replacing GitHub

Filed under
Development
Microsoft
  • GitHub’s New CEO Did a Reddit AMA, This is What he Said

    There is a growing concern that Microsoft may seek to bloat the service with add-ons, feature creep, and integrations with their own services, like Azure and LinkedIn.

    Is that likely?

  • 5 Github Alternatives

    Although GitHub is the most used platform for storing open source projects on the Internet but being acquired by Microsoft, the open source community may like to prefer the alternatives. So we have other very interesting options that we recommend to know in order to decide which one to publish and store your own creations and adaptations in the cloud.

  • Three Takes On Microsoft Acquiring Github

    But, as someone who believes in the value of reinvention and innovation among the tech industry, it's not necessarily great to see successful mid-tier companies just gobbled up by giants. It happens -- and perhaps it clears the field for something fresh and new. Perhaps it even clears the field for that utopic git-driven world that Ford envisions. But, in the present-tense, it's at least a bit deflating to think that a very different, and very powerful, approach to the way people collaborate and code... ends up in Microsoft's universe.

    And, as a final note on these three pieces: this is why we should seek out and promote people who actually understand technology and business in understanding what is happening in the technology world. The Guardian piece is laughable, because it appears to be written by someone with such a surface-level understanding of open source of free software that it comes off as utter nonsense. But the pieces by Ford and Thompson actually help add to our understanding of the news, while providing insightful takes on it. The Guardian (and others) should learn from that.

  • Mailing lists vs Github

    The alternative method is the developer mailing list. It arose in the late eighties to early nineties, and predates the popularity of the web browser. But far from being a mere historical curiosity, the discussion list is still the primary method of development in many important open source projects, from databases to operating systems to web browsers.

    In this article I’ll carefully compare the use of mailing lists with code collaboration web sites such as Github. I’ll do my best to present the pros and cons of each, so that projects assessing the two can make an informed decision.

Microsoft's and Apple's Lies About Free/Open Source Software

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac

GNOMEs beat Microsoft: Git Virtual File System to get a new name

Filed under
Microsoft
GNOME

Microsoft is going to rename the Git Virtual File System to eliminate its clash with GNOMErs.

The purpose of the Git Virtual File System was laudable: Redmond's developers were sick of taking the afternoon off after typing “git clone” (even “git checkout” could take hours), so they gave GitHub users a workaround.

At the time, Microsoft's Saeed Noursalehi explained that GVFS “virtualises the file system beneath your repo and makes it appear as though all the files in your repo are present, but in reality only downloads a file the first time it is opened.”

At last, developers could handle terabyte-size repos without taking up knitting.

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GitHub to be Run by People Who Killed Novell, RoboVM and More (the Mono Entryism)

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
  • De Icaza links make Friedman wrong choice to head GitHub [Ed: De Icaza played a very major role in the Microsoft-Novell patent deal that eventually killed Novell]

    If Microsoft thought that selecting Nat Friedman to head its new acquisition, GitHub, would help burnish its open-source credentials, then it has made a big mistake.

    Members of the free and open source software community have very long memories and the contribution made by Friedman and his great friend and business partner, Miguel de Icaza, now also an employee of Microsoft, to numerous incidents many years ago that split the community have not been forgotten.

    For those who have been hiding under a rock, Microsoft on Monday (US time) announced that it was buying GitHub for for US$7.5 billion (A$9.79 billion) in Microsoft stock.

  • GitLab Ultimate and Gold now free for education and open source

    It has been a crazy 24 hours for GitLab. More than 2,000 people tweeted about #movingtogitlab. We imported over 100,000 repositories, and we've seen a 7x increase in orders. We went live on Bloomberg TV. And on top of that, Apple announced an Xcode integration with GitLab.

The GitHub Exodus: Linux/FOSS Does Not Love Microsoft

Filed under
Development
Microsoft
  • A Bright Future with GitHub? Microsoft muscles in

    GitLab reported that 13,000 projects moved from GitHub to GitLab on the day of Microsoft’s acquisition announcement. That’s, of course, a small drop in the ocean compared to the 80 million projects currently hosted on GitHub.

  • Blockchain Developers Abandon Github Following Microsoft Acquisition

    Microsoft’s acquisition of open source code repository Github has provoked protest from members of the crypto community. Developers of bitcoin core and other blockchains have expressed disquiet at the corporate takeover, with several stating their intent to migrate to an alternative platform at the earliest possible convenience.

  • Peer Mountain Joins the Largest Open-Source Blockchain Initiative, Enterprise Ethereum Alliance

    Peer Mountain has announced that it has joined the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA), the world’s largest open-source blockchain initiative. The move introduces Peer Mountain to collaborate with thought leaders across several industries, as well as providing access to a number of resources. Working with other members of the EEA will allow Peer Mountain to reinforce its capability to address enterprise use cases.

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Security: Updates, Mirai and Singapore's Massive Breach

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Mirai botnet hackers [sic] avoid jail time by helping FBI

    The three men, Josiah White, 21, Dalton Norman, 22, and Paras Jha, 22, all from the US, managed to avoid the clink by providing "substantial assistance in other complex cybercrime investigations", according to the US Department of Justice. Who'd have thought young hacker [sic] types would roll over and show their bellies when faced with prison time....

  • A healthcare IT foundation built on gooey clay
    Today, there was a report from the Solicitor General of Singapore about the data breach of the SingHealth systems that happened in July. These systems have been in place for many years. They are almost exclusively running Microsoft Windows along with a mix of other proprietary software including Citrix and Allscript. The article referred to above failed to highlight that the compromised “end-user workstation” was a Windows machine. That is the very crucial information that always gets left out in all of these reports of breaches. I have had the privilege of being part of an IT advisory committee for a local hospital since about 2004 (that committee has disbanded a couple of years ago, btw). [...] Part of the reason is because decision makers (then and now) only have experience in dealing with proprietary vendor solutions. Some of it might be the only ones available and the open source world has not created equivalent or better offerings. But where there are possibly good enough or even superior open source offerings, they would never be considered – “Rather go with the devil I know, than the devil I don’t know. After all, this is only a job. When I leave, it is someone else’s problem.” (Yeah, I am paraphrasing many conversations and not only from the healthcare sector). I recall a project that I was involved with – before being a Red Hatter – to create a solution to create a “computer on wheels” solution to help with blood collection. As part of that solution, there was a need to check the particulars of the patient who the nurse was taking samples from. That patient info was stored on some admission system that did not provide a means for remote, API-based query. The vendor of that system wanted tens of thousands of dollars to just allow the query to happen. Daylight robbery. I worked around it – did screen scrapping to extract the relevant information. Healthcare IT providers look at healthcare systems as a cashcow and want to milk it to the fullest extent possible (the end consumer bears the cost in the end). Add that to the dearth of technical IT skills supporting the healthcare providers, you quickly fall into that vendor lock-in scenario where the healthcare systems are at the total mercy of the proprietary vendors.

Recoll – A Full-Text GUI Search Tool for Linux Systems

We wrote on various search tools recently like in 9 Productivity Tools for Linux That Are Worth Your Attention and FSearch, and readers suggested awesome alternatives. Today, we bring you an app that can find text anywhere in your computer in grand style – Recoll. Recoll is an open-source GUI search utility app with an outstanding full-text search capability. You can use it to search for keywords and file names on Linux distros and Windows. It supports most of the document formats and plugins for text extraction. Read more

today's howtos

Linux Foundation for Sale

  • Open Source Summit EU Registration Deadline, Sept. 22, Register Now to Save $150 [Ed: Microsoft is the "DIAMOND" sponsor of this event, the highest sponsorship level! Linux Foundation, or the Zemlin PAC, seems to be more about Microsoft than about Linux.]
  • Building a Secure Ecosystem for Node.js [Ed: Earlier today the Zemlin PAC did this puff piece for Microsoft (a sponsor)]
  • The Human Side of Digital Transformation: 7 Recommendations and 3 Pitfalls [Ed: New Zemlin PAC-sponsored and self-serving puff piece]
    Not so long ago, business leaders repeatedly asked: “What exactly is digital transformation and what will it do for my business?” Today we’re more likely to hear, “How do we chart a course?” Our answer: the path to digital involves more than selecting a cloud application platform. Instead, digital, at its heart, is a human journey. It’s about cultivating a mindset, processes, organization and culture that encourages constant innovation to meet ever-changing customer expectations and business goals. In this two-part blog series we’ll share seven guidelines for getting digital right. Read on for the first three.