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Microsoft

Sorry, Windows 10 Fans, but This Is What Icons Should Look Like

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Microsoft

The icon theme of an operating system has more importance than people might imagine. Microsoft has updated the icons for the latest Windows 10 preview and they actually look terrible and they lack consistency. We listed a few Linux ones for a better comparison.

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An Outsider’s Perspective on Windows 10 Preview

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Long story short, Windows 10 feels like a beta for an early version of Android, a consumer operating system that is designed to be on-line all the time. It does not feel like an operating system I would use to get work done. In fact, other than watching movies, browsing the web or listening to music, I don’t think I would find Windows 10 particularly useful. At least not without the on-line account stuff being removed and the package manager(s) fixed. Forcing users to sign up for an on-line account is a sure way to tell us privacy is not a concern and the alternative, downloading applications from the web, is a sure way to introduce malware.

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Also: Windows vs Linux: The 2015 Version

Windows 10 versus Linux

Redmond’s ‘Free’ Gambit

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Microsoft

Last week, I had to laugh aloud at Microsoft’s announcement that Windows 10 would be offered as a free upgrade for users of both Windows 7 and Windows 8. This was a strange synchronicity, as I’d wondered allowed in an article earlier in the week, “If Microsoft can’t give Windows away for free on the laptop, how long will it be able to continue selling it on the desktop?” It was a rhetorical question, with no answer expected, but I got one anyway: Not too long.

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OEMs Adapt To The Decline In The Market For PCs

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

ACER, for instance, is even diversifying ChromeBooks, cranking out small, medium and large sizes.

Meanwhile, Qualcomm is rumoured to be shipping a 14nm, 8-cored, LPDDR4 RAMed monster “for mobiles”, and other processors with clocks in the 2-2.5gHz range, in late 2015. If you don’t think desktops/notebooks/tablets/smartphones will all shine with such power, you are living in a deep hole. OEMs will find a way to integrate ARM into every aspect of IT. We are no longer living in a time when */Linux or ARM were just “barely good enough”. They are perfect for many purposes. Consumers want them. OEMs will supply them. Shipped by the millions, these new solutions will cost much less than Wintel’s monopolistic prices.

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'Windows Must Go Open Source': What Happened?

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Microsoft

It was a bold prediction in 2009 that Microsoft would take its Windows operating system open source. The advent of Windows 10 says it hasn't come true -- yet.

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It's Windows *10*, Because It's 10 Years Behind Open Source

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Microsoft
OSS

I don't write about Microsoft much here. That's largely because, as I noted recently, open source has won. Well, it's won in the field of supercomputers, cloud computing, Web servers, mobile systems, embedded systems and the Internet of Things. Of course, it hasn't won on the desktop - although there are some interesting indications that even there things may be changing. That means Wednesday's launch of Windows 10 is still important, since it affects the daily lives of many people - far too many. Here, I want to focus on a few key aspects that emerged.

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Microsoft Is Trying and Failing at Converging Platforms, Ubuntu Does It Right

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Microsoft
Ubuntu

Windows fans are worried that the desktop PC will follow too closely the design of Windows 10 for phones and tablets, and they are right to do so. This all plays out due to Microsoft’s plans for convergence, but it's a twisted approach that only makes things more complicated than they should be.

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Microsoft Is Taking a Beating from Linux-Powered Chromebooks

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Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft is engaged in a silent war and it's actually losing. They are fighting an enemy that is so insidious and so cunning that it's actually hurting the company more than anything else. The enemy is called Chromebooks and they are using Linux.

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Peterborough City Council wants to drop 'expensive' Microsoft for open source and collaborative tools

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Microsoft
OSS

Peterborough City Council is looking to drop Microsoft and its "expensive" user agreements in favour of other, more open source applications and collaborative tools.
That's what Richard Godfrey, ICT, strategy, infrastructure and programme manager for Peterborough Council, revealed to Computing in a recent interview.

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Microsoft Can’t Sell Laptops or Phones

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Microsoft

To make matters worse, Microsoft finds itself competing in mobile with companies it thought it had eliminated from the market — like Nokia for instance.

Microsoft may have bought the Finnish company’s mobile division back in 2011, but that hasn’t kept the “old” Nokia from keeping a hand in the mobile game, where it had once excelled.

Maybe it’s set to excel again. Earlier this month, MuleSoft reported that Nokia sold 20,000 of its N1 Android tablets in China in only four minutes, exhausting their supply for the promotion. In the overall scheme of things, 20,000 tablets isn’t an awful lot, but 20,000 in four minutes certainly is. Doubtlessly, Nokia has been ramping up production.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Sick of memorizing passwords? A Turing Award winner came up with this algorithmic trick
    Manuel Blum, a professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University who won the Turing Award in 1995, has been working on what he calls "human computable" passwords that are not only relatively secure but also don't require us to memorize a different one for each site. Instead, we learn ahead of time an algorithm and a personal, private key, and we use them with the website's name to create and re-create our own unique passwords on the fly for any website at any time.
  • Car thieves use 'mystery device' to break into vehicles
    A car manufacturer recalled more than a million cars following security concerns about car hacking, as the National Insurance Crime Bureau issued an alert about a "mystery device" being used to break into vehicles by defeating the electronic locking system of later-model cars. So-called connected car "convenience technology" could put consumers at risk. "Right now, what has happened is the digital key fob has become a way for someone to steal your car," NICB investigator James "Herb" Price said.
  • Security Considerations When Moving from VMs to Containers
    We recently ran a sponsored series from Fox Technologies on Linux.com. We want to thank the company for its support and for sharing useful information for SysAdmins and developers alike. Fox Technologies is continuing the conversation with a free webinar September 17 that will address security considerations in moving from VMs to containers. More information about this webinar is below.