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Microsoft Openwashing

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Microsoft
  • Microsoft open sources new framework for Windows driver development [Ed: openwashing Microsoft Windows by pretending that when you write proprietary drivers for a proprietary O/S that does DRM, spies on users etc. you actually do something "open"]
  • Microsoft to Open Source Its Network Replication Software [Ed: Microsoft is openwashing some more of its entirely proprietary 'offerings', a hallmark of a company of liars. Come to us! The traps are free, the cages will be "open".]
  • GitHub goes off the Rails as Microsoft closes in [Ed: Microsoft will take GitHub off the rail like it did Skype and LinkedIn (totally lost)]

    GitHub's platform group is about 155 people at the moment and growing, said Lambert. And much of the group's focus is on breaking GitHub apart.

    GitHub is about a third of the way through an architectural change that began last year. The company is moving away from Ruby on Rails toward a more heterogeneous, composable infrastructure. Ruby still has a place at GitHub – Lambert referred to the company as a Ruby shop, but he said there's more Go, Java and even some Haskell being deployed for services. The goal, he explained, is to make GitHub's internal capabilities accessible to integrators and partners.

    "Our monolith is starting to break up and we're starting to abstract things into services," said Lambert. "The platform we've chosen to put them on is Kubernetes."

Microsoft Versus Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Valve is seemingly working on a way to make Windows Steam games playable on Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Gaming

It looks like Valve is working behind the scenes on enabling Linux game compatibility tools to work on Steam.

These compatibility tools allow games developed for Windows to work on Linux, similar to how the popular tool Wine has been doing for years on Linux and other Unix-based operating systems.

Earlier this week, strings of code were discovered by SteamDB in Steam’s database.

The code appears to be referencing an as yet to be revealed compatibility mode, complete with several UI elements, a settings menu, and what looks like the ability to force it on.

Read more

Microsoft Openwashing and Infiltration Tactics

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Microsoft
OSS

Microsoft and Apple Piggybacking the Competition

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Microsoft
Mac

Microsoft EEE and Openwashing

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Microsoft

Microservices and Microsoft Screwing With Kubernetes

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Server
Microsoft
  • 3 tips for moving your team to a microservices architecture

    Microservices are gaining in popularity and providing new ways for tech companies to improve their services for end users. But what impact does the shift to microservices have on team culture and morale? What issues should CTOs, developers, and project managers consider when the best technological choice is a move to microservices?

    Below you’ll find key advice and insight from CTOs and project leads as they reflect on their experiences with team culture and microservices.

  • Microsoft's Azure Kubernetes Service mucked my cluster!

    Microsoft's Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) was launched to world+dog in June, however, a few disgruntled customers say the managed container confection isn't fully baked yet.

    In a blog post published on Monday, Prashant Deva, creator of an app and infrastructure monitoring service called DripStat, savaged AKS, calling it "an alpha service marked as GA [generally available] by Microsoft."

    Deva said he moved his company's production workload to AKS last month, and has been plagued by random DNS failures for domains outside of Azure and hostnames inside the Azure Virtual Network.

    He characterized the response from Microsoft support – advice not to use excessive memory and CPU resources – as ridiculous, and said Microsoft failed to respond when told the DNS issues occurred mainly during application startup when memory and CPU usage is minimal.

Installing Windows apps on Linux is about to get easier with Winepak

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

If you've ever wanted to make the switch to Linux, but the idea of leaving behind Windows apps always seemed to be a stumbling block, you might know about Wine. Wine is a compatibility layer capable of running Windows applications on Linux and other POSIX-compliant operating systems. However, to many users, Wine itself has been a bit of a hurdle, as it isn't always considered the most user-friendly tool. That is about to change.

How? Have you ever heard of Flatpak? If not, Flatpak provides a sandbox environment in which users can run applications in isolation from the rest of the system. These applications are containerized, so you don't have to worry about dependencies. You install the container and it runs. Simple as that.

Read more

Chromebook Marketing Badmouths Windows, MacOS

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GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft
Mac

OS Turf Wars

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GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft
  • Build your own Chrome/Linux operating system with Chromium OS and Crostini

    Google is slowly starting to add support for running Linux applications on Chromebooks. But as I discovered when I tested Linux apps on the Acer Chromebook Tab 10 recently, it’s still a work in progress. The feature also isn’t available for all Chrome OS computers yet.

    That could change in the not-too-distant future. Right now you need to be running Chrome OS in the developer channel in order to enable Linux app support. There are signs that Linux app support could hit the Chrome OS beta channel this week, and it could graduate to the stable channel by the time Chrome OS 69 is released later this year.

  • Germans swing another putsch against Linux [Ed: This isn't a technical decision. It cannot be technical. I reckon some politicians/suits had too many dinners with Microsoft and maybe bribes too (like the Munich saga)]

    As initially reported by Heise, the state's tax authority has 13,000 workstations running OpenSuse -- which it adopted in 2006 in a well-received migration from Solaris -- that it now wants to migrate to a "current version" of Windows, presumably Windows 10.

  • With DaaS Windows coming, say goodbye to your PC as you know it

    Now Microsoft, which helped lead that revolution, is trying to return us to that old, centralized control model.

    Forget that noise. If Microsoft continues on this course, soon your only real choices if you really want a “desktop” operating system will be Linux and macOS. Oh, you’ll still have “Windows.” But Windows as your “personal” desktop? It will be history.

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More in Tux Machines

A Look At The Windows vs. Linux Scaling Performance Up To 64 Threads With The AMD 2990WX

This past week we looked at the Windows 10 vs. Linux performance for AMD's just-launched Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX and given the interest from that then ran some Windows Server benchmarks to see if the performance of this 64-thread CPU would be more competitive to Linux. From those Windows vs. Linux tests there has been much speculation that the performance disparity is due to Windows scheduler being less optimized for high core/thread count processors and its NUMA awareness being less vetted than the Linux kernel. For getting a better idea, here are benchmarks of Windows Server 2019 preview versus Ubuntu Linux when testing varying thread/core counts for the AMD Threadripper 2990WX. Toggled via the BIOS was SMT as well as various CCX configurations and each step of the way comparing the Windows Server 2019 Build 17733 performance to that of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with the Linux 4.18 kernel in various multi-threaded benchmarks supported under both operating systems. Read more

Kernel: RISC-V and Virtual Machine

  • RISC-V's Linux Kernel Support Is Getting Into Good Shape, Userspace Starting To Work
    The RISC-V open-source processor ISA support within the mainline kernel is getting into good shape, just a few releases after this new architecture port was originally added to the Linux Git tree. The RISC-V code for Linux 4.19 includes the ISA-mandated timers and first-level interrupt controllers, which are needed to actually get user-space up and running. Besides the RISC-V first-level interrupt controller, Linux 4.19 also adds support for SiFive's platform-level interrupt controller that interfaces with the actual devices.
  • A Hearty Batch Of KVM Updates Land In Linux 4.19
    There is a lot of new feature work for the Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) within the Linux 4.19 kernel.

Kate/KTextEditor Picks Up Many Improvements To Enhance KDE Text Editing

Even with KDE's annual Akademy conference happening this past week in Vienna, KDE development has been going strong especially on the usability front. The Kate text editor and the KTextEditor component within KDE Frameworks 5 have been the largest benefactors of recent improvements. This KDE text editing code now has support for disabling syntax highlighting entirely if preferred. When using syntax highlighting, there have been many KTextEditor enhancements to improve the experience as well as improvements to the highlighting for a variety of languages from JavaScript to YAML to AppArmor files. Read more

KStars v2.9.8 released

KStars 2.9.8 is released for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. It is a hotfix release that contains bug fixes and stability improvements over the last release. Read more Also: KDE Itinerary - How did we get here?