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Microsoft

Microsoft announces its next upcoming failure: Cortana for Android and iOS

Filed under
Android
Microsoft

So, again, I ask "Why is Microsoft bothering?" The answer is probably as simple as an attempt to gain some traction in the mobile world. Microsoft continues to struggle mightily in the mobile world. This move could well be their last ditch effort to make some noise. And with the upcoming release of Windows 10, it makes perfect sense.

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Linux Mint window customization options outshine Windows

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Whenever I'm not at home, I'm taking my ThinkPad laptop with me hat I installed Linux Mint on. While I could run a flavor of Windows on the device as well, I made the deliberate decision to install Linux on the device to discover what it has to offer.

I discovered the window customization settings recently on the system and have to admit that I wish that Windows would offer similar options. While it is certainly possible to use third-party programs for that on Windows, at least for some functionality, there is nothing comparable when it comes to native Windows customization options.

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Open Source History: What if GNU and Linux Had Cloned MS-DOS, Not Unix?

Filed under
GNU
Microsoft

First, let's run through what actually happened. When Richard Stallman started the GNU project in 1984, he intended from the beginning to write a clone of the Unix operating system. He explicitly rejected the notion that GNU might instead aim to copy an operating system like MS-DOS. As he wrote in the February 1986 GNU newsletter, platforms like DOS, although "more widely used" than Unix, were "very weak systems, designed for tiny machines."

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Windows Could Receive a Hard Blow As Linux Is Finally Being Considered for ATMs

Filed under
Microsoft

The ATM Industry Association or ATMIA has released a white paper today in which they recommend the use of Windows 10 on ATMs, skipping any intermediary steps, and for the first time they are considering Linux as a viable option.

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Linux and Windows Are Heading Towards a War That Microsoft Will Lose

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

The "battle" between Windows and Linux is more of a fictional one, and it has been raging on for the past couple of decades. It wasn't really a battle, despite what each side was saying, but that will undoubtedly change when Linux clearly becomes a force to be reckoned with.

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Windows 10 vs Ubuntu – Which OS Will Be The First?

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Buyers, especially tech enthusiasts are crazy about the latest tablets and phones that roll out, thus the sales for PCs are pretty low. In the near future, individuals may start using these devices as desktop PCs instead. A major blow for the computer companies might be on the verge of happening, thus a new design concerning the software may also be implemented. So, we can say goodbye to operation systems and apps with one sole UI. It would be awesome though to see how the apps we use change their format depending on how they are being used. This whole process was called convergence and was inspired by those who creating Ubuntu OS when they rolled out a mobile device that also worked as a computer back in 2013. And even though the campaign for this phone didn’t go as planned, those at Canonical were dedicated to implement big changes and make their Ubuntu operating system, into this versatile UI. And right behind them is the Microsoft Company, a strong competitor that also wishes to do the same thing with Windows 10. So it seems that the “convergence” battle is on and the question is: which one will stir the biggest wave?

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Also: Ubuntu Phones vs Windows 10 Mobile – how they fare against each other

Ubuntu & the Windows Subscription Gambit

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

If you believe what you read, which isn’t always a good idea, Nadella & Company is good with the fact that Windows’ market share is shrinking and the company is more than willing to share market space with others, like OS X, Chrome OS, and presumably Linux. The common knowledge is that the folks in Redmond have come to accept the future and understand that Windows will no longer continue being the cash cow on which an empire was built. Microsoft, going forward, will be more humble than it was in the past and will be leaving it’s plans for world domination behind.

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Top tips for finding free software

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Instead of MS Office, try LibreOffice, which contains a word processor, spreadsheet program, presentation software and much more. It borrows its design heavily from older versions of Office so it should be familiar. Even better, it can open and save Microsoft Office documents, and with each release it gets faster and more Office compatible.

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Symple PC’s Gift to Reglue

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The CIO had already released a memo to all tech support chiefs, stating that all retiring hardware should be placed on pallets for pick up by a soon-to-be-named reclamation and recycling vendor. The real kick? They’re paying big money to have their stuff picked up and parted out for profit — all in the name of “responsible recycling.” Rick quietly shared with me that the CIO was miffed because we were repurposing their donated computers with GNU/Linux. Because we were removing Windows, he thought the donated hardware was being wasted.

Being aware of this before I walked into the meeting gave me the satisfaction of knowing they would to lie to me in order to get me out the door. That was fine. I wasn’t going to release my inner cry baby over it. Where the hammer meets the nail, this was my fault anyway. I should have known better than to rely upon a single source for donations. Besides, no one is obliged to donate. Donations are to be accepted with grace and gratitude, and not to be expected as an entitlement. I wrote a letter to the firm, thanking them for their generous support over the past few years and wished them well. I want back to work and hoped I’d find a way to make up for the loss.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more