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Microsoft

Microsoft Loves Linux?!

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Gaming
  • Ori and the Blind Forest won't come to Linux for now, thanks to Microsoft

    Other Microsoft published games have made their way to Linux, so it's not out of the question. It depends what sort of publishing deal they signed, still a damn shame though.

  • Microsoft Blocks Linux Game Port From Happening

    The reference was in regards to a Linux port of Ori and the Blind Forest, a single-player adventure game developed by Moon Studios and originally released earlier this year. Ori is powered by the Unity Engine, which would make a Linux port possible, but apparently the publishing deal with Microsoft Studios would prevent the game from being released outside of Microsoft platforms.

Op-Ed: Microsoft makes it more difficult to run Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

There are numerous computer operating systems (OS) other than the various versions of Windows and this includes well over 100 distributions of Linux-based systems.

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5 ways Ubuntu Linux is better than Microsoft Windows 10

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Windows 10 is a pretty good desktop operating system. Unfortunately, that OS is very far from perfect. The most glaring issue, of course, is the confusing privacy settings. Plus, let us not forget the arguably shady tactics Microsoft is employing to get users to upgrade to the operating system. While Windows 10 is more focused than its predecessor, there is still a lack of consistency, such as having a Settings Menu and separate Control Panel menu.

Meanwhile, in the land of Linux, Ubuntu hit 15.10; an evolutionary upgrade, which is a joy to use. While not perfect, the totally free Unity desktop-based Ubuntu gives Windows 10 a run for its money. Does this mean I think Linux will soon rule the desktop? Absolutely not. Windows will still be dominant in number of installs for the foreseeable future. With that said, more does not always mean better. Here are 5 ways Ubuntu bests Windows 10.

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Is Lubuntu Faster Than Windows XP And Frankly Who Cares?

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Scientifically there is a reason Windows XP slows down over time and it is due to the file allocation table and the fragmentation of the hard drive.

When you start with a freshly installed system all the files are at the start of the disk. As files are added and deleted they space out over the disk, leaving gaps.

A recommended performance improvement for Windows XP is to defragment the hard drive.

All of those Windows engineers couldn't have been wrong for all those years could they?

No they weren't.

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Security: GNU/Linux Versus Windows

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Microsoft
Security
  • Towards (reasonably) trustworthy x86 laptops

    Can we build trustworthy client systems on x86 hardware? What are the main challenges? What can we do about them, realistically? Is there anything we can?

  • Recently Bought a Windows Computer? Microsoft Probably Has Your Encryption Key [Ed: yes, flawed by design]

    One of the excellent features of new Windows devices is that disk encryption is built-in and turned on by default, protecting your data in case your device is lost or stolen. But what is less well-known is that, if you are like most users and login to Windows 10 using your Microsoft account, your computer automatically uploaded a copy of your recovery key – which can be used to unlock your encrypted disk – to Microsoft’s servers, probably without your knowledge and without an option to opt-out.

    During the “crypto wars” of the nineties, the National Security Agency developed an encryption backdoor technology – endorsed and promoted by the Clinton administration – called the Clipper chip, which they hoped telecom companies would use to sell backdoored crypto phones. Essentially, every phone with a Clipper chip would come with an encryption key, but the government would also get a copy of that key – this is known as key escrow – with the promise to only use it in response to a valid warrant. But due to public outcry and the availability of encryption tools like PGP, which the government didn’t control, the Clipper chip program ceased to be relevant by 1996. (Today, most phone calls still aren’t encrypted. You can use the free, open source, backdoorless Signal app to make encrypted calls.)

Why Windows is the biggest let down

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Why Windows is the biggest let down

    I moved away from windows years ago, and recently, and reluctantly decided to dual boot along side Ubuntu, and heres why I am ready to smash up the HDD with windows installed.

    I went from someone who loved windows, back from 98 to XP, then tolerated it along side linux, eventually phased it out of my life, and now wish it would burn and go to hell.

  • 'Free' Windows 10 Has An Expensive Secret

    Consequently what I believe is that no matter Microsoft’s original intentions (that the ‘free offer’ was genuinely for one year or a smoke and mirrors trick to encourage adoption) the scenario has now changed because of one thing: Adoption Rates. Right now Microsoft is missing them.

    Supersite for Windows breaks the numbers down in detail, but in a nutshell Microsoft currently has little to no chance of reaching its target of having Windows 10 installed on one billion PCs within “2 to 3 years” of release.

    At it stands at the time of publication, Windows 10 has been installed on 110m PCs and roughly one million more are being upgraded each day. Amazing as that figure sounds, it’s bad news for Microsoft as Supersite for Windows explains the operating system was doing 2.5m installs per day in its first month of release and 1.6m installs per day by the end of October.

Linux Foundation’s Deal With the Devil

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Linux
Microsoft

If the suits who sit in the boardrooms of corporate tech think they need Microsoft — quite frankly, at this stage of the game they do — then the Linux Foundation will continue to put lipstick on a pig and declare there will be peace in our time, even as Microsoft continues practices like extorting money from manufacturers of Linux devices for patents it may or may not have.

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Microsoft is in an apologetic mood right now -- what next? 'Sorry for Windows 10'?

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Microsoft

Sorry may be the hardest word, but it seems to be tripping off Microsoft's tongue quite freely at the moment. Maybe it's the holiday season making the company look at itself, but we've had two apologies in recent days -- first, a semi-apology for stealing OneDrive storage from people, and now it's sorry about the Surface Book and Surface Pro 4.

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Linux Foundation and PRISM

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Linux
Microsoft

Openwashing

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Microsoft
Mac
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Linux Twitter App ‘Corebird’ Now Supports Longer Tweets
    An updated version of the open-source desktop Twitter client Corebird is available for download. Corebird 1.3.2 is the second bug-fix release since the release of Corebird 1.3 back in July. It enables support for the social media service’s newer, longer tweets. Twitter says the new so-called “expanded tweets” do not count media attachments (photos, GIFs, videos, and polls) towards the 140-character limit. It also says it plans to exclude usernames in replies from the character count too, though an exact date for this has yet to be announced.
  • GTK Radio Player ‘Gradio’ Gets New Beta Release, Gains New Features
    A new beta release of the desktop radio player app GRadio is available for download — and it’s broadcasting a wealth of changes. Developer Häcker Felix says the next major stable release needs to deliver ‘a rock-solid stable base for the next versions’, and to do so he needs feedback on how the app is shaping up right now.
  • Kdenlive news and packaging
    Following our last week’s monthly Café, we decided to concentrate on advanced trimming features and if possible an audio mixer for the next Kdenlive 16.12 release. It was also mentionned that several users requested the comeback of the rotoscoping effect, which was lost in the KF5 port, preventing some users to upgrade their Kdenlive version.

today's howtos

Linux Graphics

  • The RADV Radeon Vulkan Linux Driver Continues Picking Up Features
  • OpenChrome Maintainer Making Some Progress On VIA DRM Driver
    Independent developer Kevin Brace took over maintaining the OpenChrome DDX driver earlier this year to improve the open-source VIA Linux graphics support while over the summer he's slowly been getting up to speed on development of the OpenChrome DRM driver. The OpenChrome DRM driver was making progress while James Simmons was developing it a few years back, but since he left the project, it's been left to bit rot. It will take a lot of work even to get this previously "good" code back to working on the latest Linux 4.x mainline kernels given how DRM core interfaces have evolved in recent times.
  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!
    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux 4.8 gets rc8
    Chill, penguin-fanciers: Linux lord Linus Torvalds is sitting on the egg that is Linux 4.8 for another week. As Torvalds indicated last week, this version of the kernel still needs work and therefore earned itself an eighth release candidate.
  • Linux 4.8-rc8 Released: Linux 4.8 Next Weekend
  • Linux Kernel 4.7.5 Released with Numerous ARM and Networking Improvements
    The fifth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series, which is currently the most advanced, secure and stable kernel branch you can get for your GNU/Linux operating system, has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux kernel 4.7.5 is here only ten days after the release of the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.4, and it's a big update that changes a total of 213 files, with 1774 insertions and 971 deletions, which tells us that the kernel developers and hackers had a pretty busy week patching all sorts of bugs and security issues, as well as to add various, much-needed improvements.
  • Blockchain Summit Day Two: End-Of-Conference Highlights From Shanghai
    Financial services firms and startups looking to be the bridge to blockchain ledgers continued to dominate presentations on the second and final day of the Blockchain Summit, ending International Blockchain Week in Shanghai that also saw Devcon2 and a startup demo competition.
  • Testing Various HDDs & SSDs On Ubuntu With The Linux 4.8 Kernel
    Here are some fresh benchmarks of various solid-state drives (SATA 3.0 SSDs plus two NVMe M.2 SSDs) as well as two HDDs for getting a fresh look at how they are performing using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. After publishing Friday's Intel 600P Series NVME SSD tests of this lower-cost NVM Express storage line-up, I continued testing a few other SSDs and HDDs. These additional reference points are available for your viewing pleasure today. The additional data is also going to be used for reference in a Linux 4.8-based BCache SSD+HDD comparison being published next week. Stay tuned for those fresh BCache numbers.