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Microsoft

Keeping the Blockchain Open in the Shadow of Tech Giants

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
OSS

You’ll find it parroted most in the open source community, particularly when Microsoft pulls stunts like their recent “partnering” with canonical to implement an Ubuntu-like Posix environment in Windows Ten. The phrase originates from the DOJ’s findings during the United States v. Microsoft Corp. antitrust case in 2003, as an internal standard for their technology development. Examples of Microsoft’s attempts at this methodology are pervasive in their offerings, including ActiveX and DirectX in the web and graphics software ecosystems, and recently, their involvement with the Linux community.

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Microsoft E.E.E.: Some of the Latest

Filed under
Microsoft

It's time for Microsoft to give up on Windows Phone and switch to Android

Filed under
Android
Microsoft

Windows Phone has all but died on the vine, and with less than 2 percent market share, it is unlikely to gain any new ground given the pummeling it is receiving from the twin mobile titans of iOS and Android.

But one of those foes actually offers Microsoft a possible lifeline, and a way to make a bigger impact in the mobile space. It's time for Microsoft to dump Windows Phone and start making Android smartphones.

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GNU/kWindows

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • GNU/kWindows

    There has been a lot of talk lately about a most unique combination: GNU—the fully free/libre operating system—and Microsoft Windows—the freedom-denying, user-controlling, surveillance system. There has also been a great deal of misinformation. I’d like to share my thoughts.

    [...]

    Free software is absolutely essential: it ensures that users, who are the most vulnerable, are in control of their computing—not software developers or corporations. Any program that denies users any one of their four freedoms is non-free (or proprietary)—that is, freedom-denying software. This means that any non-free software, no matter its features or performance, will always be inferior to free software that performs a similar task.

    Not everyone likes talking about freedom or the free software philosophy. This disagreement resulted in the “open source” development methodology, which exists to sell the benefits of free software to businesses without discussing the essential ideological considerations. Under the “open source” philosophy, if a non-free program provides better features or performance, then surely it must be “better”, because they have outperformed the “open source” development methodology; non-free software isn’t always considered to be a bad thing.

    [...]

    Secondly, when you see someone using a GNU/kWindows system, politely ask them why. Tell them that there is a better operating system out there—the GNU/Linux operating system—that not only provides those technical features, but also provides the feature of freedom! Tell them what free software is, and try to relate it to them so that they understand why it is important, and even practical.

    It’s good to see more people benefiting from GNU; but we can’t be happy when it is being sold as a means to draw users into an otherwise proprietary surveillance system, without so much as a mention of our name, or what it is that we stand for.

  • Good bye “open source”; hello “free software”

    Everyone has at least a good reason to prefer software freedom over non-free software products.

Some Early Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux Vulkan Tests With NVIDIA Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Microsoft

For this early comparison were the recent results I did of OpenGL and Vulkan on Ubuntu using The Talos Principle. Those tests were two weeks ago with the NVIDIA 364.12 driver on Ubuntu 16.04 with the Linux 4.4 kernel. The system used for this old and new testing was the same Intel Xeon E3-1280 v5 Skylake box with MSI C236A Workstation motherboard, 16GB of DDR4-2133MHz memory, and 120GB Samsung 850 SSD. With today's Windows 10 Pro x64 tests, the NVIDIA 364.72 driver was at play.

[...]

With regard to the Vulkan performance between Windwos 10 and Ubuntu 16.04, while both were using the NVIDIA 364 series driver, the Linux results on all three graphics cards were noticeably faster! Quite interesting considering that usually the NVIDIA graphics performance is close to each other under Windows and Linux, at least from past OpenGL comparisons. But again, this was just some very initial testing done today.

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Also: Vulkan 1.0.9 Specification Released

Microsoft Neglects Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft Loves Neglects Linux

Ubuntu on Windows - The good, the bad and the just plain weird

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Bad Thing #1 – It's not open source

That's right. The software for running Ubuntu Linux's userland applications on Windows is, at least as of this writing, closed source.

That just plain stinks. Hopefully this gets remedied quickly. It's early enough that I'm willing to give the team behind this the benefit of the doubt that, by the time there is an official public release, there will be source code available under a reasonable license.

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Maybe it’s time to trust Microsoft. Maybe not.

Filed under
Microsoft

Is this truly a changed Microsoft? Personally, I don’t believe it is. The day they stop this silly 235 patent BS, then we might talk about it. But you know as well as I do, if they pull the covers back on their lie-of-the-century, then they may stand to lose billions in paying back those companies they extorted in the past.

“Oh those patents. Yeah, that was silly wasn’t it. Well, we’re sorry your company lost share holder value due to having to pay us all that money. But let’s just let bygones be bygones…whaddaya say?

Stick it all up in your bygones Microsoft. You’re a liar and a thief and the only reason most of your higher execs aren’t in prison is that U.S. law and your good ol’ boy network protected you. You aren’t fooling anyone. You don’t love Linux any more than I love liver and onions. You have merely realized that the only way you are going to survive into the next decade is to integrate Linux into your strategies…and integrate it deeply.

Let’s face it. You need us. More than we need you.

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Proprietary Software

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Skype For Linux: Dead? Or Just Resting? [Ed: Microsoft never added GNU/Linux support to Skype but merely inherited it when NSA/Microsoft took over, then phased it out, over time]

    Last month many users reported that Microsoft had broken the app's ability to join calls. Two Linux enthusiasts penned the issue in a blog signed by "lots of angry Linux users." I have contacted Microsoft numerous times over the past few weeks but it remains tight-lipped on the matter. I have a feeling Microsoft isn't going to update Skype for Linux.

  • Vivaldi – A Modern Web Browser for Next Generation Internet Browsing

    Vivaldi is a Chromium/Blink engine based web browser with very appealing interface. The browser is tab based thus allowing user to open multiple tabs and switch between them using input devices. The browser is designed to fit all the open tabs in one windows.

I hate Microsoft Office

Filed under
Microsoft

Here's an example: The icon to delete emails in Outlook is a swooshy "χ" icon. That seems out of step with the smooth appearance that Microsoft seems to prefer. The swooshy "χ" is probably supposed to make Office look cool, but to me it just looks old. Like, that was a neat idea in the 1990s or early 2000s, but today that's just clutter.

The rest of Office just seems confusing and overwrought. I have a hard time using it. I've been using Microsoft Office for three months, and only recently did I discover that I can cancel out of previewing an attachment in Outlook. Seriously, all this time I've been clicking into other emails just to exit out of the attachment preview mode.

Yeah, the usability in Microsoft Office is weird.

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  • Proxmark Pro Proxmark3 Standalone Open Source RFID Tester (video)
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  • ErupteD Brings Vulkan To The D Programming Language
    The D programming language is just the latest to have support for Vulkan alongside C++, Rust (via Vulkano, if you missed that project), Go, and many other modern languages getting bindings for this Khronos Group high performance graphics API. Should you not be familiar with the D language, see Wikipedia.

Leftovers: Security