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Microsoft

5 reasons why you should switch from Windows XP to Lubuntu

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Windows XP is dead. Some people may not be aware of this fact but I'm telling you now "That parrot is dead".

Microsoft ended support for Windows XP on April 8th 2014 but what does end of support mean? Does it mean it doesn't work anymore?

Actually, Windows XP will continue to work perfectly well for quite some time but the trouble is that any remaining security holes will remain unplugged and that leaves a huge opportunity for the cyber criminals to exploit any individual or organisation that remains on that platform.

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Also: Announcing Lubuntu Week

Windows: Another nail in the coffin?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

That system is Wine, a software “go-between” that lets users run Windows applications without a copy of Microsoft Windows. Wine isn’t an operating system in its own right, just a layer that sits on top of free systems like Linux. It doesn’t run every Windows program but offers seamless compatibility on many of the most recent and popular applications. Used in conjunction with a free graphical operating system like Ubuntu, it’s an option that could save you up to £80 on Microsoft’s current asking price.

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HP's The Machine kicks Microsoft to the curb in favor of Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

My how the times have changed. At one point, HP and Microsoft were sharing friendship bracelets and having slumber parties. In fact, over the last decade, HP was a major player with Microsoft. Those days are gone. The juggernaut that was once Microsoft is slowly toppling and companies like HP are seeing the writing on the wall. That writing includes the likes of Android, Linux, iOS -- platforms perfect for mobile and embedded systems.

To that end, Hewlett Packard has decided to kick Microsoft to the curb and develop their own operating system that will power all of their future devices. In particular, HP is working on a device they call "The Machine." This new device will be made up of several new technologies -- including a new type of memory -- and will run a new operating system based on...

Wait for it...

Linux.

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New Computer Blues

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
-s

Looking around the BIOS let me set the Secure Boot to boot other OSes. It wouldn't let me just disable it completely. I set the boot order to boot the DVD drive first and tried to run those Linux live disks. Mageia 4 wasn't going to let me change the video driver from VESA no matter what. Cinnamon crashed once loading NVIDIA drivers in Mint 17. openSUSE behaved the best in giving me nice video support. I figured I'd install openSUSE and use it until Mint 17 came out in the KDE version.

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Windows 8 ban encourages domestic developers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Instead, the Chinese government is calling for the increased purchase and development of domestically developed operating systems, specifically those created on Linux. Although the ban of Windows 8 does not directly affect the general public, Sina News reports that the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology is pushing for domestic users to gravitate from Windows XP to domestic operating systems too. It's not too far fetched an idea, either–China has a long history of successfully developing domestic software. The messaging software QQ, for example, is more popular than the foreign-developed MSN, since it was specifically developed to cater to Chinese people's sensibilities.

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Woolworths smashes Windows and switches to Chrome OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft

Retail giant Woolworths has announced a massive IT transformation program, confirming it will phase out its huge collection of Microsoft Windows desktops in favour of 8000 Google Chrome OS machines.

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Reports Cites Google Surpassing Microsoft in Browser Market Share

Filed under
Google
Microsoft

ADI technology analyst Tyler White speculated that two underlying market forces are boosting Google's numbers. “First, device defaults matter,” White said. “Internet Explorer leverages its Windows OS dominance to gain share as the default Web browser for the majority of people online. Today mobile OS is more important, giving Google and Apple a leg up with default status on Android and iOS.”

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Has Microsoft really changed its attitude toward open source?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Okay, I hate to be a Negative Ned here, but I'm firmly in the "trust but verify" camp when it comes to Microsoft and open source. Yes, a new CEO and other changes may be helping Microsoft to adjust to living in an open source world. But change never comes easy or fast in such a large organization, so I think the jury is still out on whether or not Microsoft has really changed for the better when it comes to open source software.

Also, I've never forgotten the company's "embrace, extend, extinguish" strategy that they used in the past to destroy competitive software products. That alone is reason enough to keep a wary eye on Microsoft's involvement with any open source project. Perhaps the company really has changed, but maybe it hasn't. I think it bears watching for at least another few years to see if enduring change has really set in or not.

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China puts Windows 8 on TV, screams: 'SECURITY, GET IT OUT OF HERE!'

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

China has stepped up its war on Microsoft's Windows 8 operating system with a report in state-backed media that questions the security of the software.

In a one and a half minute segment aired on China's CCTV television channel, journalists reported that the Chinese government is concerned by the security of the Windows 8 software and is increasing efforts to develop its own rival system.

"Microsoft would no longer open its Windows 8 source code to the Chinese government, however the security scheme of the Windows 8 operating system is designed to provide better access for Microsoft to users' database. For China it's a big challenge for our cybersecurity," said Yang Min, a professor at China's Fudan University, through a translator.

"Your identity, account, contact book, phone numbers, all this data can be put together for big data analysis," explains another academic, Ni Guangnam. "The US has a law that requires anyone that has this data to report to the government. The data might be a good way for the US to monitor other countries."

This report follows the Chinese government banning Windows 8 from a chunk of its public sector PCs in late-May.

In March 2013, El Reg reported that Canonical had partnered with various Chinese government agencies to develop and support a Linux distribution named Ubuntu Kylin for the country. Given this television segment, we imagine installations of that OS are about to increase.

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Also: China escalates rhetoric in campaign to ban Windows 8

Microsoft's China Syndrome

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The history of Linux in China is chequered. Android is doing extremely well there, even if it tends to be varieties that are more or less independent from Google (no bad thing.) But on the desktop, GNU/Linux has had a pretty disastrous showing. That's strange, because you would think that the Chinese authorities would jump at the chance to adopt a free operating system that was independent of the US, and which could be inspected for NSA backdoors even before the current Snowden leaks showed why that would be a good idea.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation's certification sets new benchmark for admins

At LinuxCon last week, the Linux Foundation announced a new certification scheme for Linux professionals to complement their existing training activities. The Linux Foundation Certification Program offers a peer-verified certification for both early-career and engineer-level systems administrators for a fee of $300. The process involves a real-time skill test administered via a remote-access virtual machine running one of several Linux distributions. To ensure the rules are followed, a human proctor watches the test via screen-sharing and video camera using your own computer at a location of your choice. The certification tests real-world skills for both sys admins and more senior engineers at the command line and in configuration files. Read more

Linux Mint Debian to Be Called "Betsy"

"The upcoming release of LMDE will be version 2, codename 'betsy' and it will use a Debian 'jessie' package base. The team is currently adapting to the new LMDE, setting up its repositories and porting various packages onto it. The target for a stable release is estimated for this November, along with an official upgrade path from UP8 to Betsy," said the leader of the Linux Mint project, Clement Lefebvre. Read more

Adapting to the Mobile World

Now more than ever companies are gaining a mobile presence due to the popularity of smartphones and tablets. It is important to any company’s success to become part of the mobile world if they want to build business. Consumers used to look up companies in the phonebook, but now the first action consumers take when they need to find a company is to look them up online. If consumers cannot find a company online, they are likely to find a different company instead of continuing the search through other means. Because the Internet is so easily accessed from mobile devices now, consumers use their devices to find their favorite companies so a strong mobile presence is a must if companies do not want to lose business. Hasbro goes mobile According to Mobile Marketer, Hasbro has decided to create a mobile presence in order to keep up with video games. So far Hasbro’s Monopoly application has been a great success because it promotes family and friend engagement and users can personalize the app by uploading pictures of themselves to use as game pieces. Consumers like personalization, and so if companies want to see success from their mobile marketing strategies they should consider personalizing them to consumers in some way. Companies hesitate to go mobile because they are set in their ways, and they might already be seeing success, however as technology advances all companies should consider building a mobile presence if they want to continue to be successful. Successful mobile marketing techniques Thanks to mobile devices there are a number of ways companies can reach out to consumers who use them. SMS advertisements are a great way to personalize advertising for consumers making them feel important and ultimately driving in business. Marketing applications are another way companies can engage with consumers on a more personal basis. Consumers like to be in control, and applications are a great way they can control the type of marketing they receive. If apps are intriguing enough, consumers are likely to promote them to friends and family, which will ultimately promote business. Convenience of being mobile Consumers like the convenience of being able to locate and engage with their favorite companies from their mobile devices, so it is important that companies maintain that presence. Consumers are looking for ways to make their lives easier, and being able to purchase products with the click of a button or pay bills on the fly will only increase business for companies because consumers are always looking for convenience. Being mobile can benefit companies in several ways, but one way that is especially appealing to companies is the ease of keeping track of business thanks to their mobile presence. Mobile devices and websites help companies to keep track of important data such as which marketing strategies are working the best and where most of the sales are coming from. Being mobile can enhance business in several ways and should be a priority for all companies. Mobile Technology News brought to you by businesstexter.com Source: mobilemarketer.com/cms/news/gaming/18437.html

Why we use open source - Australia’s Immigration agency explains

Why choose open source? “In some ways, [the open source software used by the agency] is effectively more capable” than commercial products, he said. “In terms of cost-effectiveness, [it] wins hands down: no license/maintenance fees, extensible architecture [and] global open source R&D.” The team uses an open source software package called ‘R’. Read more