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Microsoft

Microsoft versus Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • From Windows to Linux: yes, that is still a thing

    A request from a bank to look at a switch from Windows to Linux has led to UK-based IT specialist Patrick Fitzgerald and his colleagues at British firm i-Layer developing a detailed method for an institution to make the transition.

    Fitzgerald, who gave a talk about it at SUSECon 2016, has been in the IT business for a long time. He and his colleagues only came up with the detailed plan when he had to tackle the task set for him by the Allied Irish Bank.

    "The bank has 900 branches and 7500 teller workstations," Fitzgerald said. "After the move, just two people are needed to manage the lot." He added that the smallest branch had just two users, one teller and ran on bandwidth of 128k.

    The bank initially called him in for advice and help when it experienced a shortage of trained staff.

  • A Loopy Non-Interview With Linux Advocate Marcel Gagné

    This week, Roblimo again takes a virtual trip up to the Great White North, that would be Canada for the benefit of the NSA and those of you taking notes at home, and has way too much fun hanging out with Linux advocate Marcel Gagné.

  • Why open source Munich may bring Windows back [Ed: Microsoft paid a lot of money for Wim Coekaerts to pretend that "Microsoft loves Linux", but he has just quit]
  • Open source champion mulls return to Microsoft [Ed: More Microsoft nonsense courtesy if its proxy Accenture which tries to undermine Munich's migration and success story]
  • The Renaissance Continues for Open Source Artificial Intelligence [Ed: the latest Microsoft openwashing from the usual suspects]

Wim Coekaerts Quits Microsoft

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Microsoft

Wim Coekaerts first got a job working as a support analysts for Oracle in Belgium in March 1995. He ended up moving up the ranks at Oracle, leading Linux and virtualization efforts, until he left in March 2016.

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Microsoft (and Accenture/Lenovo) Attacks on GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

When Microsoft Pays Companies to Play Along With the "Loves Linux" Lie

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Microsoft
  • Why Is Corporate Linux Welcoming Microsoft?

    The next largest Linux companies are even smaller.Canonical Software and SUSE are both private companies, so their income is unreported, but both have around 700 employees apiece.

    In other words, what is easy to miss if you are working with Linux and open source regularly is how small their corporate presence actually is. Probably, the average computer user has never heard of Red Hat, Canonical, or SUSE.

    However, when a small company welcomes a megacorporation into its professional association or signs an agreement with one, its name is reported in places where it is rarely heard. By association, it becomes a player.

    For example, take the case of Canonical. Founded in 2004, it has never reported a profit, although its OpenStack division did well enough in 2015 that going public was briefly an option.

  • Trinity Updated, Welcoming Microsoft, Munich Backslide

    Why oh why is the Linux world so quick to welcome our once mortal enemy into the fold? Matt Hartley today said it basically boils down to "the lines between proprietary and free software are blurring" - at least for those wanting them to blur. I imagine they're still pretty bold to Richard Stallman types. Nevertheless, Hartley said for corporate Linux that line is fairly blurry and, for said corporations, Microsoft's new leaf seems sincere. He also said that Microsoft's desire to use Linux proves we've won world domination as we always said we wanted. In addition, Microsoft lends credibility to companies such as Red Hat, SUSE, or Canonical and cooperation might be the best hedge against future patent litigation.

Open-source pioneer Munich debates report that suggests abandoning Linux for Windows 10

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Over a nine year period starting in 2004, the council moved about 15,000 staff from using Windows and Office to LiMux—a custom version of the Ubuntu desktop OS—and other open-source software. At the time, Munich was one of the largest organizations to reject Windows, and Microsoft took the city's leaving so seriously that then CEO Steve Ballmer flew to Munich to meet the mayor.

Now a report commissioned by current mayor Dieter Reiter to help determine the future of IT at the council has outlined a project to make Windows 10 and Microsoft Office available to all departments, and give staff the choice about whether to use Windows or LiMux.

If Windows subsequently became a popular choice, the report says "it could be investigated whether it makes economic sense to continue using Linux as a client operating system".

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Web Browsers

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Microsoft
OSS
  • Another 40 million people bolt from Microsoft's browsers as mass exodus continues [iophk: "can only truly leave the browser by leaving that so-called OS, because it is tied into the system"]

    Microsoft’s browsers hemorrhaged another 40 million users last month, according to analytics vendor Net Applications, pushing the year’s total number of deserters near the one third of a billion mark.

    Net Applications pegged the combined user share of Internet Explorer (IE) and Edge at 28.4% for October, a fall of 2.3 percentage points. The month’s decline was the second-largest ever for Microsoft’s browsers, behind only May’s plummet of 2.7 points.

    Unlike in most previous months, Microsoft’s bane was not Google’s boon, but instead Mozilla’s. Firefox’s user share jumped nearly 2 percentage points, to 11.1%. Atop an almost-as-large increase in September, Mozilla’s Firefox has stepped away from a precipice, and in two months recovered almost all the losses it incurred during the past year.

    IE has shed 20.2 percentage points in 2016, and the fall shows no sign of stopping, or even slowing. In the last six months, four have recorded declines of 2 points or more, twice the number of the six months before that.

  • Microsoft loses about 40 million Internet Explorer users in one month

    Despite continued updates and improvements to its Edge browser, Microsoft can’t seem to hold on to users as they transition from various versions of Internet Explorer. The latest figures suggest that in October alone, Microsoft shed some 40 million users, with the likes of Chrome and Firefox scooping them up.

    Looking at the latest data from NetMarketShare, Chrome is still the undisputed king of the hill, boasting the kind of percentages Microsoft used to enjoy — with a 55 percent market share at the end of October. It found an extra 0.58 percent from the likes of Internet Explorer, which dropped a surprising 2.5 percent — equivalent to about 40 million users, per ComputerWorld.

  • Chrome/Chromium Now Enabling WebGL 2 By Default On The Desktop

    With the very latest open-source Chromium web-browser development code, WebGL 2.0 support is now being turned on by default for desktop (non-Android) builds.

    With the latest Chromium Git as of yesterday, WebGL 2 is turned on by default for the desktop but isn't yet ready to be turned on for the Android builds. The WebGL 2 support can be toggled via about:flags.

  • Firefox disables loophole that allows sites to track users via battery status

    Mozilla Firefox is dropping a feature that lets websites see how much battery life a visitor has left, following research showing that it could be used to track browsers.

    The feature, called the battery status API, allows websites to request information about the capacity of a visitor’s device, such as whether or not it’s plugged in and charging, how long it will last until it is empty, and the percentage of charge remaining.

    It was intended to allow websites to offer less energy-intensive versions of their sites to visitors with little battery power left: for instance, a mapping site could download less information, or a social network could disable autoplaying video.

Windows Gets Better... for Advertising Microsoft

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Microsoft
  • Here we go again: Microsoft's popping up ads from the Windows 10 toolbar

    When Microsoft’s Windows 10 deadline passed, many heaved a sigh of relief, thinking that Microsoft’s obnoxious popup reminders had finally been laid to rest.

    Surprise! Microsoft’s at it again, reminding users to sign up for Microsoft Rewards (formerly Bing Rewards) by using Edge, Windows 10’s built-in browser. My colleague Brad Chacos was hit by the ad above after hours, reported it, and immediately erased Edge from his toolbar.

    Here’s what we know: The popup doesn’t seem to appear if you use Edge frequently (Brad does not). Personally, I’ve never experienced a similar ad, though I use Edge as well as Microsoft Rewards, meaning there’s no need for such an ad to appear.

  • Microsoft: use Edge or Ads

    Windows 10 felt in many regards like an operating system that was not ready for release back when Microsoft released it. This was the case for the new system browser Microsoft Edge as well, as it lacked a lot of features.

    While it was highly optimized, it felt like a browsing shell more than a full browser in many regards. Microsoft worked on improving Edge, and it did so over time by introducing new functionality such as browser extensions.

  • Windows 10 Serving Edge Advertisements

    These ads appear over the Edge icon in the Windows 10 taskbar, even when Edge is not open. They do appear only when Edge is not the default system browser but that covers the majority of Windows 10 systems.

Latest on CodeWeavers/CrossOver

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Microsoft
Software
  • The Times Are a Changing

    When did it hit me that the times were a changin’ at CodeWeavers corporate Headquarters (and no it wasn’t when Bob Dylan got awarded the Noble Peace Prize for Literature)? Maybe it was when we introduced CrossOver on a platform not in our sandbox – ANDROID. Or when we lost our COO of 14 years to a new career opportunity, or rearranged the office (everyone had to move offices and have a new office mate), or chalk painted furniture, or had an office pet for a day, or when the conference room moved, or the standard monthly company meeting date moved after 20 years in existence (revolution). AND we bribed attendance with bagels instead of donuts. Or was it when everyone went from a Linux or macOS to a Windows system?

  • Microsoft Office 2013 Working On CrossOver 16

    CodeWeavers announced this week they've hit the milestone in CrossOver 16 development where they have been able to successfully register Microsoft Office 2016 in an internal alpha build of CrossOver 16. With this support in the upcoming CrossOver 2016, Office 2013 is working with all core functionality including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Project.

  • CodeWeavers to Bring Microsoft Office 2013 to CrossOver 16 for Linux and macOS

    On the third day of November 2016, CodeWeavers, the company behind the popular, yet commercial CrossOver graphical user interface (GUI) to Wine, celebrated a major milestone, as they successfully registered Microsoft Office 2013 in the application.

    Yes, you're reading that right, the next major CrossOver release, versioned 16, will bring support for the Microsoft Office 2013 office suite. What this means for you is that you'll finally be able to install, register and use Microsoft Office 2013 on your GNU/Linux or macOS operating system using CrossOver 16, due for release later this year.

Microsoft Fakes FOSS

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Microsoft
OSS
  • No, Microsoft does not love open source

    I used to follow Microsoft's intellectual property Twitter account in order to see exactly how much Microsoft loved open source as it bragged about all the people it had coerced into signing patent agreements. I guess someone realized that crowing about that was not a great idea, because today the feed tweets puff pieces about how great software patents are and how they drive innovation (through litigation).

    The truth is that Microsoft’s principal open source strategy hasn’t changed and probably never will. The point of open source to Microsoft (or any other company) is to give you an on-ramp to its platform. For Microsoft, that platform is morphing from Windows to Azure, so of course Microsoft has dialed back its rhetoric toward Linux. If you read Microsoft hates Linux, then you probably won’t host your VMs on Azure -- same deal if you have a choice between two virtual private clouds. Duh, Microsoft loves Linux ... on Azure. Why wouldn’t it?

    Microsoft may even be willing to accept open source that's tied to its technologies, but not directly to its platform. Generally these will be “children’s edition” versions like .Net Core. I’m not saying Visual Studio for Linux isn’t progress, but is anyone really itching to run .Net on Linux? I mean, after the outrageous commercial success of Mono (/sarcasm), are any of you going, “Woo-hoo, I want to write .Net code and run it on Linux”? Bueller? Bueller? Anyone?

    Now, about those lawsuits -- Microsoft likes it both ways: Embrace on one hand, and get tidy patent settlements on the other. People who work at Microsoft say it's a big company, and as with all big companies, the left hand doesn’t know what the right hand is doing. Actually, that would be dismal management -- if “we love open source” was really part of Microsoft's strategy.

    As evidence that Microsoft loves open source and Linux, last year Microsoft noted some long-running lawsuits that it wasn't really winning and dropped them. Repositioning “we cut our losses” to “because we love you” is good PR. Respect! But let’s talk about real change.

  • Hard 'committals', Microsoft open sources cloud hardware [Ed: Yet more openwashing of Microsoft; this is NOT "Open Source" (as per OSI licences)]

Windows 10 market share stalls after free upgrade offer ends

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Microsoft

Windows 10's market share has stalled, according to all three of the traffic-measurement tools The Register tracks at the start of each month.

Our three sources are Netmarketshare, StatCounter and analytics.usa.gov. All three investigate web traffic to determine operating system prevalence, with the third source only considering traffic to United States Government web sites.

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More in Tux Machines

Boards With Linux

  • Latest Linux Maker Boards Gamble on Diversity
    As usual, last week’s Embedded World show in Nuremberg, Germany was primarily focused on commercial embedded single board computers (SBCs), computer-on-modules, and rugged industrial systems for the OEM market. Yet, we also saw a growing number of community-backed maker boards, which, like most of the commercial boards, run Linux. The new crop shows the growing diversity of hacker SBCs, which range from completely open source models to proprietary prototyping boards that nevertheless offer low prices and community services such as forums and open source Linux distributions.
  • Rugged, expandable 3.5-inch Skylake SBC supports Linux
    Diamond’s 3.5-inch “Venus” SBC offers an Intel 6th Gen CPU, -40 to 85°C support, up to 20GB of ruggedized RAM, and mini-PCIe and PCIe/104 OneBank.
  • How enthusiasts designed a powerful desktop PC with an ARM processor

    The purpose of the gathering was to get the ball rolling for the development of a real desktop based on ARM. The PC will likely be developed by 96boards, which provides specifications to build open-source development boards.

Has Interest in Ubuntu Peaked?

This graph represents Google search volume for Ubuntu (the OS) from 2004 until now, 2017. Looking at the image it us hard to not conclude one thing: that interest in Ubuntu has peaked. Read more Also: Ubuntu splats TITSUP bug spread in update

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Windows flaw lets attackers take over A-V software

    A 15-year-old flaw in every version of Windows right from XP to Windows 10 allows a malicious attacker to take control of a system through the anti-virus software running on the system.

  • Google Continues to Make Strides in Improving Android Security
  • Google cites progress in Android security, but patching issues linger
  • Dark Matter
    Today, March 23rd 2017, WikiLeaks releases Vault 7 "Dark Matter", which contains documentation for several CIA projects that infect Apple Mac Computer firmware (meaning the infection persists even if the operating system is re-installed) developed by the CIA's Embedded Development Branch (EDB). These documents explain the techniques used by CIA to gain 'persistence' on Apple Mac devices, including Macs and iPhones and demonstrate their use of EFI/UEFI and firmware malware. Among others, these documents reveal the "Sonic Screwdriver" project which, as explained by the CIA, is a "mechanism for executing code on peripheral devices while a Mac laptop or desktop is booting" allowing an attacker to boot its attack software for example from a USB stick "even when a firmware password is enabled". The CIA's "Sonic Screwdriver" infector is stored on the modified firmware of an Apple Thunderbolt-to-Ethernet adapter.