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Microsoft

Rumour that Microsoft considers purchasing Canonical

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Does Microsoft Love Linux As Much As It Hates Oracle SQL Databases?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Given the long wait, the SQL Server 2016 support for Linux servers seems to reflect a business tactic more than any actual love on Microsoft's part for the open source community.

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Microsoft Openwashing

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Microsoft

Wine 1.9.6 Better Detects GPUs Using Mesa Drivers

Filed under
Microsoft
Software

Wine 1.9.6 was released this morning as the latest bi-weekly development release of Wine.

Most prominent to Wine 1.9.6 is now that it better detects graphics cards using the Mesa drivers. There is also more support for Shader Model 5, C++ exception handling improvements, and a total of 32 known bug fixes. Shader Model 5.0 is what's needed by DirectX 11 support.

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Also: Wine 1.9.6 Is Out with Better Video Card Detection, Shader Model 5 Support

5 reasons Microsoft may never give up on Linux patent claims

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Legal

There are many reasons why Microsoft may not join the Open Innovation Network (OIN) anytime soon. First of all, if a company doesn’t want to use patents as a weapon, it won’t, whether or not it joins OIN.

At the same time, joining OIN doesn’t guarantee that a company won't use patents as a weapon. Both Oracle and Google are OIN members and they have locked horns in one of the fieriest battles in the open source world. IBM is one of the founders of OIN and it has also sued companies (like Groupon) over various patents.

So as much as I believe joining OIN sends a positive message, I don’t think that’s _the_ ultimate solution.

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Also: Microsoft's Linux Inquisitor Grand Master is off to Spotify

The one thing Microsoft must do - but won't - to gain open-source trust

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

So, why are people still paying up rather than fighting? Because patent litigation is incredibly expensive. It's cheaper to pay a $5 to $15 per device licensing fee than to pay a small fortune and take even a remote chance of failure in court.

And Microsoft? Come on, back in 2014, Microsoft was already making about $3.4 billion from its Android patents. Samsung alone paid Microsoft a billion bucks to license its Android patents. This is serious money even by Fortune 500 standards.

In its last quarter, between volume licensing and patents, Microsoft accounted for approximately 9 percent of Microsoft's total revenue.

And, that, of course, is why Microsoft is never going to stop charging for its Android patents. So long as the boys from Redmond can milk these patents for billions every year, they're going to keep them.

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Is Microsoft Trying To Attack Open Source And Linux With Its “Patent Bombs”?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Legal

Last week, Microsoft got involved in a legal issue and secured patent licenses from Wistron of Taiwan and Rakuten of Japan around Linux and Android technologies. While Microsoft is already making billions with its patents in Android, its history of Linux-related patent trolling isn’t hidden from anyone. The open source community remains frightened of Microsoft as no one knows who could be the next one to get a notice from Microsoft’s legal guys.

In another case that violates the trust of open source community, Microsoft has recently claimed that it came up with the idea for Continuum and “invented” the concept. On the other hand, Canonical has been working on Convergence since 2013, even though it was never released to the public up until recently.

There’s no doubt that Microsoft has made some serious contributions to the open source community and expressed its love for Linux. However, if Redmond really cares, it should work transparently to win the trust of the open source community as any company’s success in the world of open source depends on its users and developers.

Satya Nadella should also consider joining the Open Innovation Network (OIN) and sending a message the open source world to become a trusted member of the community.

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50 shades of Microsoft's flirtation with Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

If Microsoft really cares about Linux and open source, if they really want to be part of the community. they must win the trust of the community. As I've said before and will say again, if Microsoft really loves Linux, they must make a public pledge to not go after Linux. They should join the Open Innovation Network (OIN) to send a message to the Linux and open source world that they are in it with us, that they are not going to attack us, to destroy us if we use Linux.

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Microsoft Does to Oracle What Oracle Tried To Do to Red Hat

Filed under
Red Hat
Microsoft

In 2006, Oracle began trying to abscond with RHEL’s paying user base. On Thursday, Microsoft announced that it’s now going to give Oracle a similar treatment. What’s that they say about paybacks?

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SONIC is not, I repeat, NOT a Microsoft Linux distro

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Now, that's neat, but it's no Linux distribution. This is really just the next natural software-defined networking (SDN) step forward from Microsoft's previous "Linux release:" Azure Cloud Swtich (ACS).

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

Emulation or WINE

Fedora: The Latest

  • New "remi-php71" repository
  • PHP on the road to the 7.1.0 release
  • First round of Fedora 24 Updated Lives now available. (torrents expected later this week)
    As noted by my colleague on his blog the first round of F24 Updated Lives are now available and carry the date 20160720, Also as mentioned last week on his blog F23 Respins are not going to be actively made, however we and the rest of the volunteer team will field off-off requests as time and resources permit. We are considering a new/second tracker for the Updated Spins but as of today there are only .ISO files available at https://alt.fedoraproject.org/pub/alt/live-respins [shortlink] F24 Live-Respins . The F24 respins carry the 4.6.4-200 Kernel and roughly ~500M of updates since the Gold ISOs were released just 5 weeks ago. (some ISOs have more updates, some less)

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Snappy Packaging Happenings In The Fedora, Arch Space
    This week Canonical hosted a Snappy Sprint in Heidelberg, Germany where they worked to further their new package management solution originally spearheaded for Ubuntu Touch. This wasn't an Ubuntu-only event, but Canonical did invite other distribution stakeholders. Coming out of this week's event were at least positive moments to share for both Arch and Fedora developers. The Arch snaps package guy made progress on snap confinement on Arch. Currently when using Snaps on Arch, there isn't any confinement support, which defeats some of the purpose. There isn't any confinement support since it relies upon some functionality in the Ubuntu-patched AppArmor with that code not yet being mainlined. Arch's Timothy Redaelli has got those AppArmor patches now running via some AUR packages. Thus it's possible to get snap confinement working on Arch, but it's not yet too pleasant of an experience.
  • PhantomJS 2.1.1 in Ubuntu different from upstream
    At the moment of this writing Vitaly's qtwebkit fork is 28 commits ahead and 39 commits behind qt:dev. I'm surprised Ubuntu's PhantomJS even works.
  • Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS released
    Ubuntu 16.04 is a LTS version of Ubuntu.Now Ubuntu team has announced the release of it's first point release,Ubuntu 16.04.1.This first point release includes many updates containing bug fixes and fixing security issues as well and as always what most of users want from a distribution and most of distributions tries to perform,Stability.This release is also well focoused on stabilty as Ubuntu 16.04.