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Microsoft

Red Hat lauds, criticizes Microsoft's Linux efforts

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Microsoft

infoworld.com: While applauding Microsoft's contribution of code to the Linux community this week, Red Hat nonetheless urged its rival to pledge that it will never use its patents against Linux.

Microsoft and Linux: A Checkered Past

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Linux
Microsoft

networkworld.com: Microsoft has had a checkered past with both Linux and its open source GPL licensing structure, so the move was a jaw dropper. Here is a look at some of the milestones since Microsoft internal memos leaked in 1998 that attacked the open source Linux operating system as it began to pick up steam as an alternative to Windows.

Microsoft Making Peace With Linux? Not So Fast

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Microsoft
  • Microsoft Making Peace With Linux? Not So Fast

  • Is Microsoft's GPL2 support really a big deal?
  • How Microsoft made open source selfish
  • Microsoft Foresees More Open Source Contributions
  • Microsoft code cannot taint Linux

Desktop Linux or Windows 7?

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Linux
Microsoft

earthweb.com: With the recession in full swing, I have found a growing number of people questioning the value of moving onto Windows 7 upon its release.

Linux slips into Microsoft's warm, deadly embrace

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Microsoft

infoworld.com: Make no mistake: This is a hostile action on Microsoft's part. Its stated mission is to squash Linux like a bug, and the easiest way to do that is to feign friendship -- to offer a bogus olive branch, then switch it out at the last minute for a nasty bundle of thorns.

Pigs do fly: Microsoft unleashes 20,000 lines of Linux code

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Microsoft
  • Pigs do fly: Microsoft unleashes 20,000 lines of Linux code

  • Virtualization, cloud underlie Microsoft's Linux kernel submission
  • Microsoft embraces GPL, opens Hyper-V to Linux with LinuxIC
  • Microsoft Delivers Code to the Linux Kernel – with help from Novell

  • Microsoft embraces Linux cancer to sell Windows servers
  • Microsoft donates code to Linux: Remember, folks, what comes after 'Embrace'
  • Microsoft contributes to Linux kernel: a CAOS Theory Q&A
  • Understanding Microsoft's Linux code shocker
  • It's getting cold in here

Microsoft's next operating system may start from BSD

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Microsoft

advogato.org: Barelfish. Have anybody heard such a beast? Not somewhere behind the steel walls - in the academic silence of ETH university Microsoft is building the next generation of its operating system.

I Fear Microsoft Geeks Bearing Gifts...

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Microsoft

opendotdotdot.blogspot: Look, those nice people at Microsoft Research are saving science from its data deluge-> Project Trident: A Scientific Workflow Workbench allows scientists to easily work with large volumes of data. Basically Project Trident is more Project Trojan Horse.

Comfort zones: Windows vs. Linux

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Linux
Microsoft

news.cnet.com: Where's your comfort zone? Windows, Mac, Linux? In the consumer laptop space, specifically Netbooks, there isn't much hope for a Linux-based operating system in the near term. So, first the bad news.

Microsoft aims to price itself into the open source market

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Microsoft

irishtimes.com: A fair price. What does that mean? If you ask most of us, abruptly, when we’re not expecting an economics exam, we’d say that a fair price is the cost of a good, plus a little on top for profit, writes Danny O'Brien.

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Is Open Source an Open Invitation to Hack Webmail Encryption?

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