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Microsoft

The Slim Possibility That Microsoft's SUSE Deal Could Be Good for Linux

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

linuxinsider.com (blog safari): Well July has come and gone for another year here in the Linux blogosphere, and not a moment too soon. It was a Microsoft-filled month, and that trend continued right up until the very end.

SUSE & Patent FUD: Who Do We Boycott Now?

Filed under
Microsoft
Web
SUSE

fossforce.com: Now that Microsoft and SUSE have announced they plan to continue sleeping together, I wonder if the folks at Techrights are rethinking their plans to pull the plug on Boycott Novell?

MS-DOS is 30 years old today

Filed under
Microsoft

extremetech.com: Thirty years ago, on July 27 1981, Microsoft bought the rights for QDOS (Quick and Dirty Operating System) from Seattle Computer Products (SCP) for $25,000. QDOS, otherwise known as 86-DOS, was designed by SCP to run on the Intel 8086 processor, and was originally thrown together in just two months for a 0.1 release in 1980.

Microsoft and SUSE extend Microsoft's controversial Novell Linux pact

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

zdnet.com: Microsoft and SUSE announced they are extending the 2006 Microsoft-Novell Linux patent-protection agreement, and that Microsoft is buying $100 million worth of SUSE Linux Enterprise certificates for its customers.

Is Microsoft Linux's New BFF?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

linuxinsider.com (blog safari): "M$ hates Free Software of any kind," asserted blogger Robert Pogson. "They have attacked Linux, the GPL, copyleft, etc. -- stuff that would be of no interest to them at all except their customers see the advantages of Free Software."

No apologies for Microsoft Windows

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

zdnet.co.uk: Recently I've had some discussion with colleagues about Mac OS X, Windows, and Linux in comparison to each other. Generally, I've found that most people agree that Mac OS X [and Linux] is more stable than Windows. But after that being said, they come back with an apology for Microsoft.

Linux receives 20th birthday video from Microsoft

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

digitizor.com: The Linux Foundation is celebrating 20 years of Linux and as a part of the celebration, they are accepting videos as part of a video contest. One of the video submission came form none other than Microsoft itself.

Watching our backs, and paging Dr. Godwin

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Microsoft

larrythefreesoftwareguy.wordpress: Is it time to start trusting Microsoft? The answer is clearly, “No. Absolutely not.” We should not trust Microsoft as far as Steve Ballmer can throw a chair.

Infamous Microsoft FUD Campaigns Against Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

junauza.com: Here is a look at the history of Microsoft's infamous FUD (Fear, uncertainty and doubt) campaigns against Linux and FOSS:

Microsoft contributes a lot of changes to Linux kernel 3.0

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

h-online.com: The 343 changes made by Microsoft developer K. Y. Srinivasan put him at the top of a list, created by LWN.net, of developers who made the most changes in the current development cycle for Linux 3.0.

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Canonical released today new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases, patching recently discovered security vulnerabilities, including the infamous BlueBorne that exposes billions of Bluetooth devices. The BlueBorne vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000251) appears to affect all supported Ubuntu versions, including Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) up to 16.04.3, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) up to 14.04.5, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) up to 12.04.5. Read more

Security: Updates, 2017 Linux Security Summit, Software Updates for Embedded Linux and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • The 2017 Linux Security Summit
    The past Thursday and Friday was the 2017 Linux Security Summit, and once again I think it was a great success. A round of thanks to James Morris for leading the effort, the program committee for selecting a solid set of talks (we saw a big increase in submissions this year), the presenters, the attendees, the Linux Foundation, and our sponsor - thank you all! Unfortunately we don't have recordings of the talks, but I've included my notes on each of the presentations below. I've also included links to the slides, but not all of the slides were available at the time of writing; check the LSS 2017 slide archive for updates.
  • Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT
    The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embedded devices is yet another tangible example of the importance of security before bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai has caused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers due to poorly secured routers. Many of these embedded devices run a variant of embedded Linux; typically, the distribution size is around 16MB today. Unfortunately, the Linux kernel, although very widely used, is far from immune to critical security vulnerabilities as well. In fact, in a presentation at Linux Security Summit 2016, Kees Cook highlighted two examples of critical security vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel: one being present in kernel versions from 2.6.1 all the way to 3.15, the other from 3.4 to 3.14. He also showed that a myriad of high severity vulnerabilities are continuously being found and addressed—more than 30 in his data set.
  • APNIC-sponsored proposal could vastly improve DNS resilience against DDoS