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Microsoft

Would Linux help Adobe to pummel Microsoft?

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Microsoft

Matt Asay: John Dvorak thinks that Adobe has a Microsoft problem, and that Linux provides a clear solution: Adobe could port its Creative Suite...to Linux as a shot across Redmond's bow. Then the company should embrace Linux in-house and develop a complete, optimized Linux OS.

Also: Dvorak Has Right Idea, Wrong Platform

Why would anyone choose Windows over Linux?

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Linux
Microsoft

blogs.techrepublic.com: I am going out on a limb here…really opening myself up for a flame-war. But you know - there are some defining moments that beg for such an action. That action? To question why anyone (when they KNOW the difference) would seriously choose a Windows operating system over Linux.

The end of Windows as we knew it

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Microsoft

news.cnet.com: Glyn Moody has written a beautiful eulogy for the Windows desktop of yore, one that I heartily encourage you to read. Moody touches on a range of threats to Microsoft's desktop dominance, and in the process uncovers a rising threat to both Microsoft's desktop dominance and user freedom. The culprit?

The biggest Blue Screen of Death ever

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Microsoft

blogs.computerworld: No... Ah stuff; there I was watching the Olympics opening ceremonies when I thought, for just a second, that I saw a BSOD during the run up to the lighting of the Olympic flame. It turns out I hadn't been spending too much time at the keyboard. It seems that during the lighting ceremony that Windows really had fouled up on the world's largest stage.

Why Vista is not ready for Linux and Mac users

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Microsoft

izanbardprince.wordpress: I’ve started my simulated migration from Linux to Vista already, starting my dog food challenge two days early, I will go over my findings so far, sometimes making the assumptions a new Windows user would, and mostly from the perspective of a Linux “switcher”, with a dose of sarcasm.

Windows' days may be numbered

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Microsoft

computerworld.com: Some very interesting documents have been leaking out of Microsoft. They clearly indicate, believe it or not, that Microsoft is considering shifting its users from Windows to a new operating system: Midori.

Olympics Online, With a Hook

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Microsoft

nytimes.com: To view the video, it will be necessary to download a Microsoft Web browser software component based on a new proprietary technology, Silverlight. For many industry executives who compete with Microsoft the Silverlight strategy recalls a federal antitrust case in which Microsoft was found guilty.

Humor: A Better View of Microsoft Security

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Microsoft
Humor

blog.linuxtoday: Ordinarily I don't pay any more attention to Microsoft than I have to, but this was too funny to ignore: A Better View of Microsoft Security?; Microsoft to expand its Trustworthy Computing in a bid to help users and vendors understand security risks.

Why Microsoft cozied up to open source at OSCON

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Microsoft

linux.com: Last month at O'Reilly's Open Source Convention (OSCON), it seemed like Microsoft was everywhere you looked, avouching its interest in open source. Thanks to the company's history -- including some very recent history -- a great many in the open source community viewed the company's presence with mistrust, suspicious of Redmond's motives and apprehensive of what would follow. Surely Microsoft must want something, so what is it?

Microsoft's annual report: A study in open-source awareness...and ignorance

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Microsoft

Matt Asay: In reading through Microsoft's annual report, I am struck by how far the company has come in appreciating the threat that open source brings to Redmond. I'm also shocked by just how ill-informed the company continues to be with regard to open source as a business strategy.

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