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Linux

Dilution and Misuse of the "Linux" Brand

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Linux
Microsoft
Legal

Samsung, Red Hat to Work on Linux Drivers for Future Tech

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Linux
Red Hat

The metaverse is expected to uproot system design as we know it, and Samsung is one of many hardware vendors re-imagining data center infrastructure in preparation for a parallel 3D world.

Samsung is working on new memory technologies that provide faster bandwidth inside hardware for data to travel between CPUs, storage and other computing resources. The company also announced it was partnering with Red Hat to ensure these technologies have Linux compatibility.

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Mozilla Firefox 102 Is Now Available for Download, Adds Geoclue Support on Linux

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Linux
News
Software
Moz/FF

Firefox 102 is now here to introduce support for Geoclue on Linux, a D-Bus service that provides geolocation services when needed by certain websites.

It also improves the Picture-in-Picture feature by adding support for subtitles and captions for the Dailymotion, Disney+ Hotstar, Funimation, HBO Max, SonyLIV, and Tubi video streaming services, and further improves the PDF reading mode when using the High Contrast mode.

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9to5Linux Weekly Roundup: June 26th, 2022

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Linux
News

This week was all about software releases as Plasma users got a new update to their favorite desktop environment, video editors got new releases of the Pitivi and Shotcut apps, music and photography enthusiasts got new releases of the Mixxx and digiKam apps, and the next major Krita release promises big things for digital painting artists.

Not so many distro releases this week, but we did get a new version of KaOS Linux for fans of the latest and greatest KDE software, as well as a new EndeavourOS ISO snapshot that brought a major new feature for fans of ARM devices, and I had the pleasure of taking it for a spin on my Raspberry Pi 4 computer.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Open Source Security Podcast, GNU World Order, Brodie Robertson, and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Josh Bressers: Episode 329 – Signing (What is it good for)

    Josh and Kurt talk about what the actual purpose of signing artifacts is. This is one of those spaces where the chain of custody for signing content is a lot more complicated than it sometimes seems to be. Is delivering software over https just as good as using a detached signature? How did we end up here, what do we think the future looks like? This episode will have something for everyone to complain about!

  • GNU World Order 466

    **kde-dev-scripts** , **kde-dev-utils** , **kde-gtk-config** , **kdebugsettings** , **kdeclarative** , and **kdeconnect**. from Slackware set **kde**.

  • How to install Microsoft Edge on Pop!_OS 22.04 - Invidious [Ed: Edge is malware and a password stealer; don't even use it]
  • Source Vs Binary Package Managers: What's The Best? - Invidious

    Most Linux distros at this point use a binary based package management solution but source based solutions still do exist, the question is which is better and why have source based distros all but disappeared.

Linux 5.19-rc4

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Linux

So we've had a couple of fairly small rc releases, and here we finally
start to see an uptick in commits in rc4. Not what I really want to
see in the middle of the release cycle, but not entirely surprising
considering how quiet it's been so far.

And while 5.19-rc4 is a bit larger than previous rc's, and is a bit
larger than we usually see at this point, it's by no means anywhere
near record size. So more of a "a bit bigger than usual" than a "Oh my
God, this thing is huge".

The changes are also spread out fairly widely, and nothing really
stands out. I think the individually biggest patches are the reverts
to the printk threading changes that people wanted to really think
about some more, since the changes had caused some issues. The rest of
the diffstat is _fairly_ flat, with perhaps the vc4 drm patches
standing out a bit.

So at least right now this all feels like "making up for a small rc3"
rather than anything really worrisome, and probably just a result of
timing some of the patches shifted into rc4. But let's see how this
develops over the next couple of weeks.

The full shortlog with all the details is below, and I don't think
there's any larger pattern here. We've got all the usual architecture
fixes, driver fixes all over the place, and filesystems, core
networking, and tooling (perf and selftests). A lot of the changes
here are one- and few-liners.

Please do go test. Thanks,
                  Linus

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Stable Kernels: 5.18.7, 5.15.50, 5.10.125, 5.4.201, 4.19.249, 4.14.285, and 4.9.320

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Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 5.18.7 kernel.

All users of the 5.18 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.18.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.18.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h

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Also: Linux 5.15.50

Linux 5.10.125

Linux 5.4.201

Linux 4.19.249

Linux 4.14.285

Linux 4.9.320

Linux Mint: The Beginner-Friendly Linux Operating System for Everyone

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Linux

This article contains all the necessary information you need for Linux Mint and helps you to learn and make a wise decision on your journey with this operating system.
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Windows vs Linux: What's the best operating system?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The way you utilise your PC can often depend on the operating system you use as well as your level of technical knowledge. Even though most people will turn to macOS or Windows when deciding on an OS, if you want something you can customise, there's nothing better than Linux.

Despite the fact that it isn’t as popular as Windows, Linux offers far more avenues for customisation than any other OS as it's built on an open source foundation. It's certainly more intimidating to the average user as a result, but it can be incredibly powerful, and rewarding, if you possess the skills to fully take advantage of it.

Obviously, there are advantages and disadvantages with both systems that are useful to know before making the decision on which is best for you.

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Audiocasts/Shows: MPROCS, Linus Torvalds, and Linux Foundation Outsourcing to Microsoft Proprietary Software

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GNU
Linux
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today's howtos

  • How to install go1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

  • molecule test: failed to connect to bus in systemd container - openQA bites

    Ansible Molecule is a project to help you test your ansible roles. I’m using molecule for automatically testing the ansible roles of geekoops.

  • How To Install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, MongoDB is a high-performance, highly scalable document-oriented NoSQL database. Unlike in SQL databases where data is stored in rows and columns inside tables, in MongoDB, data is structured in JSON-like format inside records which are referred to as documents. The open-source attribute of MongoDB as a database software makes it an ideal candidate for almost any database-related project. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the MongoDB NoSQL database on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • An introduction (and how-to) to Plugin Loader for the Steam Deck. - Invidious
  • Self-host a Ghost Blog With Traefik

    Ghost is a very popular open-source content management system. Started as an alternative to WordPress and it went on to become an alternative to Substack by focusing on membership and newsletter. The creators of Ghost offer managed Pro hosting but it may not fit everyone's budget. Alternatively, you can self-host it on your own cloud servers. On Linux handbook, we already have a guide on deploying Ghost with Docker in a reverse proxy setup. Instead of Ngnix reverse proxy, you can also use another software called Traefik with Docker. It is a popular open-source cloud-native application proxy, API Gateway, Edge-router, and more. I use Traefik to secure my websites using an SSL certificate obtained from Let's Encrypt. Once deployed, Traefik can automatically manage your certificates and their renewals. In this tutorial, I'll share the necessary steps for deploying a Ghost blog with Docker and Traefik.

Red Hat Hires a Blind Software Engineer to Improve Accessibility on Linux Desktop

Accessibility on a Linux desktop is not one of the strongest points to highlight. However, GNOME, one of the best desktop environments, has managed to do better comparatively (I think). In a blog post by Christian Fredrik Schaller (Director for Desktop/Graphics, Red Hat), he mentions that they are making serious efforts to improve accessibility. Starting with Red Hat hiring Lukas Tyrychtr, who is a blind software engineer to lead the effort in improving Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and Fedora Workstation in terms of accessibility. Read more

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers