Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

Is New Ubuntu 18.10 Worth Installing?

Filed under
Linux

The new Ubuntu release "Cosmic Cuttlefish" has hit the OS market after 6 months of development. I've been using it since it came out and now here is what I have to say about it. In this article, I'll talk about the new things it brings in and also if it's the release worth upgrading to. So let's go.

Read<br />
more

Suddenly Linux runs in Android

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

Yes, Android is based on a modified version of the Linux kernel. But once you’ve got Android running, you can utilize this app to get Linux running inside Android. But why, you might be asking – why would you want to do that? If you have to ask, you might just want to turn back now. With this app, users are able to run Debian or Ubuntu, games like Adventure or Zork, and Math systems like Gnuplot, Octave, and R.

UserLand allows one Session at a time and can also monitor filesystems. If you’re looking for a graphical interface, and not just a command line system, you might want to take a peek at the operating system Android. In other words: This is mostly just for fun, and a sort of proof of concept – but it has so much potential!

Read more

Linux Devices: ARM/Linux in Servers and Embedded, Chromecast

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Love Microsoft Teams? Love Linux? Then you won't love this

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft loves Linux. Unless you are a Linux user who happens to want to use Teams. In that case, you probably aren’t feeling the love quite so much.

Read more

Linux-driven embedded PCs target autonomous cars

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Kontron announced two Ubuntu-driven computers for autonomous vehicles. The S2000 is a lab dev platform with a Xeon 8160T and the EvoTRAC S1901 offers a choice of Kontron modules including a new Atom C3000 based, Type 7 COMe-bDV7R.

Kontron has launched a Kontron’s S2000 Development Platform for developing autonomous in-vehicle computers and is prepping an EvoTRAC S1901 in-vehicle PC for use in advanced automotive applications, including autonomous vehicles. Both systems ship with Intel processors running a pre-installed Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Linux stack. The systems follow earlier Kontron automotive computers such as the EvoTrac G102 in-vehicle cellular gateway.

Read more

Introduction To BASH Scripting - Learn BASH #1

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to the introductory series on BASH scripting. This series will cover a complete guide on BASH starting from the foundation of computer programming then progressing on to the basic constructs of this scripting language and finally, you will also create a simple mini-project using this scripting language.

Read<br />
more

Single-board computer guide updated: Free software is winning on ARM!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

In many geeky circles, single-board computers are popular machines. SBCs come in small form factors and generally run GNU/Linux, but unfortunately, many boards like the popular Raspberry Pi are dependent on proprietary software to use. The Free Software Foundation maintains a list of system-on-chip families, sorted by their freedom status.

Unfortunately, this list had not been updated in several years. While it was accurate when it was published, free software is constantly improving. Today, more and more boards are usable with free software. On the graphical side, the Etnaviv project has reached maturity, and the Panfrost project, with which I have been personally involved, has sprung up. The video processing unit on Allwinner chips has been reverse-engineered and liberated by the linux-sunxi community in tandem with Bootlin. Rockchip boards have become viable competitors to their better known counterparts. Even the Raspberry Pi has had a proof-of-concept free firmware replacement developed. Free software is winning on ARM.

Read more

Stable kernels 4.18.15, 4.14.77 and 4.9.134

Filed under
Linux

Official TV HAT brings DVB-T2 streaming to the Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has launched a Raspberry Pi TV HAT with a Sony CXD2880 TV tuner for receiving DVB-T2 transmissions in Europe. The $21.50 board debuts a half-size HAT format.

The computer that was born to empower technology education in the UK can now be rejiggered into an old-fashioned idiot box. The Raspberry Pi Foundation has produced an official HAT add-on board for the Raspberry Pi with a Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) tuner that receives terrestrial TV signals. The $21.50 Raspberry Pi TV HAT lets you stream DTV-T2 and DTV-T video in the UK and Europe.

Read more

Raspbian Linux distribution updated, but with one unexpected omission

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Those last two are the ones that really produced some excitement in the Raspberry Pi community. Just look at that next to last one... so innocent looking... but then go and look at the discussion in the Pi Forums about it.

For those who might not be familiar with it, Mathematica (and the Wolfram language) is a technical computing system that is very widely used in both education and industry. It has been included on the Raspberry Pi since the beginning, and when you consider that a normal "desktop" license costs €160 for a "student", or €345 for "home and hobby", it's an exceptionally good deal to get it for free with a $35 Raspberry Pi. That makes it a bit easier to understand why some users would be upset about it being removed.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Intel Core i9 9900K vs. AMD Ryzen 7 2700X Linux Gaming Benchmarks

Complementing the just-published Intel Core i9 9900K Linux benchmarks with the launch-day embargo lift are the Linux gaming benchmarks... This article is looking at the Linux performance between the Core i9 9900K and AMD's Ryzen 7 2700X in a variety of native Linux games as well as comparing the performance-per-Watt. So if you are a Linux gamer and deciding between these sub-$500 processors, this article is for you. If you didn't yet read the main article that features a 15-way CPU comparison on Ubuntu 18.10 with the Linux 4.19 kernel, here is a recap of this new Coffeelake refresh CPU. The Core i9 9900K is an eight-core / sixteen-thread processor with 3.6GHz base frequency and 5.0GHz turbo frequency. This 14nm CPU has a 16MB L3 cache, dual channel DDR4-2666 support, and a 95 Watt TDP. There is also the onboard UHD Graphics 630, but if you're a gamer, that isn't going to cut it. The Core i9 9900K is launching at $499 USD. Read more

Intel Core i9 9900K Linux Benchmarks - 15-Way Intel/AMD Comparison On Ubuntu 18.10

Intel sent over the Core i9 9900K as their first 9th Gen Coffeelake-S CPU hitting store shelves today. With the embargo on that now expired, let's have a look at how well this eight-core / sixteen-thread processor performs under Linux. The Core i9 9900K is Intel's new answer for competing with the likes of the AMD Ryzen 7 2700X, but does come at a higher price point of $499 USD. While the Core i9 9900K is a Coffeelake refresh, rather than being six cores / twelve threads, they are matching AMD's precedent set by the Ryzen 7 processors in having eight cores / sixteen threads. This 14nm 8C / 16T processor has a base clock frequency of 3.6GHz with a turbo frequency at 5.0GHz, a 16MB L3 cache and supports dual-channel DDR4-2666 memory. Read more

Google: Desktop, Server and Kernel

  • Chrome OS Linux support to gain folder sharing, Google Drive, more
    Chrome OS has been shaping up to be the all-in-one system, combining the best of Google’s ecosystem, including Android apps, with the power of Linux apps. The latter is still in beta phase with improvements and new features in every update. Today we take a look at some of the features coming soon to Chrome OS Linux apps. Chrome OS first gained its Linux app support, also known as Crostini, with version 69. While it’s certainly not flawless, the support has been groundbreaking, enabling everything from full photo editors to Android Studio on Chrome OS. With upcoming versions of Chrome OS, Google is working to smoothen the rough edges of Crostini to make it easier to use.
  • Google Cloud CTO Brian Stevens on using open source for competitive advantage in the public cloud
    As all three continue to vie for the affections of CIOs, how they market their respective public cloud propositions to enterprise IT buyers has subtly shifted over time. For evidence of this, one only has to look at how little fuss the big three now make about rolling out price cuts for their services compared to several years ago, when one provider announcing a price drop would not only make headlines, but prompt its competitors to publicly follow suit too. This in itself is indicative of the fact enterprises expect more from providers than just access to cheap commodity IT services these days, and that ongoing cost reductions are simply an accepted part of using cloud, Google Cloud CTO Brian Stevens, tells Computer Weekly.
  • KUnit: A new unit testing framework for Linux Kernel
    On Tuesday, Google engineer Brendan Higgins announced an experimental set of 31 patches by introducing KUnit as a new Linux kernel unit testing framework to help preserve and improve the quality of the kernel’s code. KUnit is a lightweight unit testing and mocking framework designed for the Linux kernel. Unit tests necessarily have finer granularity, they are able to test all code paths easily solving the classic problem of difficulty in exercising error handling code.