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Linux

Mobile/Desktop Convergence

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Mobile/Desktop convergence is something that Purism had planned and has been developing since the launch of the Librem 5.

It all started with the amazing work that Adrien initiated with the libhandy library, that let the default Librem 5 applications be adapted from the exact same applications running on the laptops.

Now the Librem 5 team is moving a step further by letting the Librem 5 being used as a real desktop computer by simply plugging it into an external monitor, keyboard and mouse through a single USB hub. The feature is still under active development at the time of writing this article, but the different components are starting to come together and it is already pretty functional.

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Raspberry Pi automation add-on offers ADCs, DIDO, and UPS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Edgedevices.io’s second-gen “Pi-oT 2” Raspberry Pi automation add-on offers 8x ADCs, 6x digital outputs, and Ethernet plus options including a 2-hour UPS, RS485, 4x 24V digital inputs, and a 12-24VDC input.

Last year, Cleveland-based Pi-oT, now called Edgedevices.io, launched a Kickstarter campaign for a Pi-oT industrial controller add-on for the Raspberry Pi that is housed within a DIN-rail mountable chassis. Edgedevices.io has now returned to Kickstarter with a Pi-oT 2 model loaded with plenty of new features including DIDO and an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) while losing the 5x relays of the original.

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Also: Giveaway: Win one of three Linux-friendly LABISTS Raspberry Pi 4 8GB RAM Starter Kits worth $129.99!

What Does the Penguin Say?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I chalk this up to a few factors. First, Linux was practically born on the Web. In Linux’s infancy, Linus Torvalds not only made the kernel available online, but he attracted a throng of would-be contributors via Usenet who collaborated in Linux’s development. The Internet has been a significant distribution channel ever since, facilitating the obtainment and installation of desktop Linux distributions in the large majority of cases today.

Second, since one could not easily purchase a computer with Linux preinstalled until around the last decade, online communities were essential for fielding the questions of Linux initiates. It is comforting to know there are veterans who can help when setting up an entirely new OS, especially one so off the beaten path. This has traditionally been, and remains, Linux’s main analog to customer support that competing OSes offer.

Finally, and perhaps most significantly, Linux simply offers so many choices. Windows gives you Windows the Windows way. On Mac, you get Mac the way Mac was intended. Not so with desktop Linux. Why? Simply put, there is no one “desktop Linux.” With Linux, every distribution gives you a completely different suite of user programs built atop the kernel, sometimes with its own repackaging of the kernel itself.

Not least of the cornucopia of options that the desktop Linux world offers is that of desktop environments. Most distros present a handful of curated desktop environments. Between all the Linux distros out there, one will encounter literally dozens of them. The only hope a humble Linux user has of figuring out which one they might want, aside from taking them all for a spin, is to ask around. Users also really get into advocating for particular desktops. This is nearly always good-natured, leading to amusing, if not informative, discussion threads.

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PinePhone becomes a DIY Linux laptop with this 3D printed keyboard

Filed under
Linux

The folks at Pine64 are designing an official keyboard accessory for their Linux-powered smartphone. Eventually you’ll be able to purchase a physical keyboard that snaps onto the phone by replacing the back cover, and which will allow you to type with your thumbs without covering the display.

Or you could just 3D print your own keyboard for the PinePhone. That’s what one person seems to have done, and thanks to a series of design files posted a Thingiverse, you may be able to make your own… although there’s still some work required to make it fully functional.

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Best Linux distros for Windows users in 2020

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Switching operating systems is no small feat. You have to learn to find your way around the alien environment, traverse a new applications menu, and navigate through the nooks and crannies of the system settings to set up your new digs as per your requirements.

It can be an inundating experience, especially for people coming from proprietary operating systems like Windows. Linux distributions, thanks to their open source nature, offer a lot more access than their closed source cousins, which makes the transition particularly difficult for many users.

This is where these specialized distros, designed for Windows users, come into the picture. Their objective is to allow users to experience the goodness of Linux while minimizing the learning curve that’s associated when switching to a different operating system. They all take various steps to ensure that the transition is as effortless as possible.

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Awkward History of Linux and Latest of Reiser5

Filed under
Linux
Reiser
  • Linux in 2020 [Ed: This is clearly conflating the kernel (Linux) with GNU, which predates it by almost one decade. It also perpetuates the myth that only Ubuntu brought GNU/Linux to the masses.]

    Hello. Today I would like to share with you, my perspective of Linux. Please take note that this is all my opinions and the way I see it. If you feel that I missed something very important or have a fact or two wrong, please let me know.

    So Linux was announced for the first time, on the 25 of August 1991 by a Finnish student, called Linus Torvalds. Little did he know, and the world knows that 30 years later the world would be using it on a daily basis.

    So From 1991, Linux has been maturing several Linux Distros (operating systems) came and went away, with a few of the first ones still around today. But it was mainly/only for those who are computer "geeks" and not for everyday users. But that all changed in October 2004, when the first version of Ubuntu was released.

  • Reiser5 Logical Volume Management - Updates
      Reiser5 Logical Volume Management - Updates
    
    
    I am happy to inform, that Logical Volumes stuff has become more
    stable. Also we introduce the following changes, which make logical
    volumes administration more flexible and simple:
    
    
                      1. No balancing by default
    
    
    Now all volume operations except brick removal don't invoke balancing
    by default. Instead, they mark volume as "unbalanced". To complete any
    operation with balancing specify option -B (--with-balance), or run
    volume.reiser4(8) utility with the option -b (--balance) later.
    
    This allows to speed up more than one operations over logical volume
    being performed at once. For example, if you want to add more than one
    brick to your volume at once, first add all the bricks, then run
    balancing. There is no need to balance a volume between the addition
    operations.
    
    
                        2. Removal completion
    
    
    Operation of brick removal always includes balancing procedure as its
    part. This procedure moves out all data block from the brick to be
    removed to remaining bricks of the volume. Thus, brick removal is
    usually a long operation, which may be interrupted for various reasons
    In such cases the volume is automatically marked with an "incomplete
    removal" flag.
    
    It is not allowed to perform essential volume operations on a volume
    marked as "with incomplete removal": first, user should complete
    removal by running volume.reiser4 utility with option
    -R (--finish-removal). Otherwise, the operation will return error
    (-EBUSY).
    
    There is no other restrictions: you are allowed to add a brick to
    unbalanced volume, and even remove a brick from an unbalanced volume
    (assuming it is not incomplete removal).
    
    Comment. "--finish-removal" is a temporary option. In the future the
    file system will detect incomplete removal and automatically perform
    removal completion by itself.
    
    
                    3. Balancing is always defined
    
    
    Operation of volume balancing (regardless of its balanced status) is
    always defined, and can be launched at any moment. If the volume is
    balanced, then the balancing procedure just scans the volume without
    any useful work.
    
    It is allowed to run more than one balancing threads on the same
    volume, however currently it will be inefficient: other threads will
    be always going after the single leader without doing useful work.
    Efficient volume balancing by many threads (true parallelism) is not a
    trivial task. We estimate its complexity as 2/5.
    
    
              4. Restore regular distribution on the volume
    
    
    Custom (defined by user) file migration can break fairness of data
    distribution among the bricks. To restore regular (fair) distribution
    on the volume, run volume.reiser4 utility with the option -S
    (--restore-regular). It launches a balancing procedure, which performs
    mandatory data migration of all files (including the ones marked as
    "immobile") in accordance with regular distribution policy on the
    volume. Moreover, when the balancing procedure encounters a file
    marked as "immobile", its "immobile" flag is cleared up.
    
    
                             5. How to test
    
    
    The new functionality is available starting with the kernel patch
    reiser4-for-linux-5.10-rc3 and reiser4progs-2.0.4 (Software Framework
    Release number of both is 5.1.3).
    
  • Reiser5 Stabilizing Its Logical Volume Functionality - Phoronix

    This New Year's Eve will mark one year since the announcement of the in-development Reiser5 file-system. While the outlook for getting Reiser5 upstreamed into the mainline kernel remains murky given the out-of-tree status of Reiser4, Edward Shishkin does continue advancing this latest Reiser file-system iteration.

    Since last year's initial Reiser5 announcement, more features continue to be ironed out for this evolution of Reiser4. The latest Reiser5 functionality hitting a point of stability is its logical volume management.

GParted Live 1.1.0-8 Stable Release

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The GParted team has released a new stable version of GParted Live.

This release includes GParted 1.1.0, updated packages, and other improvements.

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openmamba “light” with LXQt desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The “light” version of openmamba is renewed by adopting the LXQt desktop environment which replaces the previous LXDE environment.

Meanwhile, the main release continues to provide users with an always up-to-date KDE Plasma desktop environment.

In the Downloads section all the supports are available to run in live mode and install openmamba on PCs (64 and 32 bit x86 compatible archs):

openmamba livecd rolling – ISO for live execution and installation of openmamba with KDE Plasma environment

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Review: ArchBang Linux 0111

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

ArchBang Linux is a lightweight distribution based on Arch Linux. Using the i3 window manager, it strives to be fast, up-to-date and suitable for desktop systems. The current snapshots of ArchBang use an unusual versioning convention with a day & month combination. For example, 0811 is the snapshot for the 8th of November. Previous versions used a year & month combination so that a snapshot from January 2014 would be 2014.01.

Apart from the shift in version numbers since the last time I tried ArchBang the distribution has also swapped out the Openbox window manager for i3 on the install media. I was curious to see how this would work. ArchBang has just one download option, a 914MB ISO file that runs on 64-bit (x86_64) machines.

The live media boots and brings up the i3 window manager. The wallpaper displays a nice water-focused nature scene. There is a Conky status panel displayed to the right of the desktop. Under the status readout there is a listing for keyboard shortcuts we can use to launch some programs, access desktop settings, and start the install process.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Derek Taylor, Open Source Security and Full Circle Weekly News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Why Do You Need All That Hardware? - YouTube

    I see this way too often in the comments of my videos and just browsing the Internet.

  • Episode 225 – Who is responsible if IoT burns down your house? – Open Source Security

    Josh and Kurt talk about the safety and liability of new devices. What happens when your doorbell can burn down your house? What if it’s your fault the doorbell burned down your house? There isn’t really any prior art for where our devices are taking us, who knows what the future will look like.

  • Full Circle Weekly News #191

    Getting Root on Ubuntu 20.04
    https://securitylab.github.com/research/Ubuntu-gdm3-accountsservice-LPE
    Intel Vulnerabilities in All Supported Ubuntus
    https://9to5linux.com/new-intel-vulnerabilities-now-patched-in-all-supported-ubuntu-releases
    Ubuntu Reverts Intel Microcode Flaws
    https://9to5linux.com/canonical-reverts-intel-microcode-update-in-ubuntu-due-to-boot-failures-in-tiger-lake-systems
    KDE Announces a Pinephone and Framework and an Update
    https://kde.org/announcements/kde-frameworks-5.76.0/
    https://kde.org/announcements/pinephone-plasma-mobile-edition/
    https://kde.org/announcements/plasma-5.20.3/
    Debian Has a New Theme
    https://bits.debian.org/2020/11/homeworld-will-be-the-default-theme-for-debian-11.html
    Feren OS November Snapshot Out
    https://medium.com/feren-os/the-feren-os-november-2020-snapshot-is-now-available-eeabf6806fb
    MX Linux 19.3 Out
    https://mxlinux.org/blog/mx-19-3-now-available/

    CentOS 7.9 Out
    https://lists.centos.org/pipermail/centos-announce/2020-November/035820.html

    Proton 5.13-2 Out
    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=Proton-5.13-2-Released

    System76’s Galago Pro Refresh Out
    https://9to5linux.com/system76-launches-new-galago-pro-linux-laptop-with-11th-gen-intel-core-cpus

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to install MySQL server on CentOS 8 Linux - nixCraft

    How do I install MySQL server 8.0 on CentOS 8 Linux server running on Linode and AWS cloud? How do I add and set up a new MySQL user and database account on the newly created CentOS server? Oracle MySQL server version 8.0 is a free and open-source free database server. It is one of the most popular database system used in web apps and websites on the Internet. Typically MySQL is part of the LAMP (Linux, Apache/Nginx, MySQL, Perl/Python/PHP) stack. Popular open-source software such as WordPress, MediaWiki, and others profoundly used by MySQL as a database storage engine. Let us see how to install MySQL server version 8.x on CentOS 8 Linux server.

  • Linux Fu: VPN For Free With SSH | Hackaday

    If you see a lot of banner ads on certain websites, you know that without a Virtual Private Network (VPN), hackers will quickly ravage your computer and burn down your house. Well, that seems to be what they imply. In reality, though, there are two main reasons you might want a VPN connection. You can pay for a service, of course, but if you have ssh access to a computer somewhere on the public Internet, you can set up your own VPN service for no additional cost. The basic idea is that you connect to a remote computer on another network and it makes it look like all your network traffic is local to that network. The first case for this is to sidestep or enhance security. For example, you might want to print to a network printer without exposing that printer to the public Internet. While you are at the coffee shop you can VPN to your network and print just like you were a meter away from the printer at your desk. Your traffic on the shop’s WiFi will also be encrypted.

  • YANUB: yet another (nearly) useless blog: QSoas tips and tricks: using meta-data, first level

    By essence, QSoas works with \(y = f(x)\) datasets. However, in practice, when working with experimental data (or data generated from simulations), one has often more than one experimental parameter (\(x\)). For instance, one could record series of spectra (\(A = f(\lambda)\)) for different pH values, so that the absorbance is in fact a function of both the pH and \(\lambda\). QSoas has different ways to deal with such situations, and we'll describe one today, using meta-data. [...] QSoas is a powerful open source data analysis program that focuses on flexibility and powerful fitting capacities. It is released under the GNU General Public License. It is described in Fourmond, Anal. Chem., 2016, 88 (10), pp 5050–5052. Current version is 2.2. You can download its source code there (or clone from the GitHub repository) and compile it yourself, or buy precompiled versions for MacOS and Windows there.

  • Many ways to sort file content on Linux

    The Linux sort command can arrange command output or file content in a lot more ways than you might realize--alphabetically, numerically, by month and randomly are only some of the more interesting choices. In this post, we take a look at some of the more useful sorting options and explain how they differ.

  • How to install Luminance HDR

    Luminance HDR is an open-source GUI tool that provides an easy to use toolkit for HDR imaging. It is available on all major Linux operating systems and is excellent for photographers. In this guide, we will go over how to install Luminance HDR on Linux.

  • How to add a WordPress user sign up - Anto Online

    Adding an external user sign up page on a website allows users to register for different roles. Once registered, they can perform tasks such as adding new articles, new comments, and even performing other actions such as designing. Allowing a user to sign up is a common thing for bloggers and companies that accept guest posts. However, this feature can also be used to offer premium content for your members. But, this may require more custom fields and branding. The default WordPress sign up page contains fixed fields and a WordPress logo.

  • How to install Lyrebird on a Chromebook - a Discord Voice Changer

    Today we are looking at how to install Lyrebird, a voice changer for Discord on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to play Brawlhalla on Linux

    Brawlhalla is a free-to-play 2D fighting game. It was developed by Blue Mammoth Games, published by Ubisoft, and released on Nintendo Switch, Xbox One, PS4, and PC. In this guide, we’ll show you how to play it on Linux.

Games: RetroArch, PulseAudio, Anarch

  • You can now try the RetroArch Playtest on Steam for Linux | GamingOnLinux

    With the awesome RetroArch application for running emulators and all sorts coming to Steam, they now have a Playtest available you can opt into to try it out. Using the new dedicated Steam Playtest feature announced by Valve in early November, developers can have a banner on their Steam store page letting users request access. So the Libretro team have put this up, and as of today it also has Linux builds available for testing.

  • PulseAudio 14.0 Released With Better USB Gaming Headset Support - Phoronix

    While in 2021 we might begin to see PipeWire replacing PulseAudio by default at least on bleeding-edge distributions like Fedora, for now PulseAudio still is the dominant sound server used by desktop Linux distributions. Rolling out today is PulseAudio 14.0. PulseAudio 14.0 comes with many changes compared to PulseAudio 13.0 that shipped all the way back in September of 2019.

  • "Anarch", a new, public-domain Doom-like game coded from scratch in <256K

    I've argued that the video-game "Doom" is a sort of cultural version of Turing Completeness. Given that we're jamming computers and screens into just about any device these days, inevitably (and delightfully) someone gets it to run Doom: Watches, digital cameras, ATMs, pregnancy sticks. But you know what's even cooler? Creating your own new, original game in the exactly style of Doom, and making it so wildly resource-efficient that it fits in under 256K and will run on just about any computational device around. That's what the programmer Miloslav Číž has done, with his new game "Anarch". You can play it in your browser here or download it here; I just blasted away in it for a while, and it's a hoot — he neatly channels the mechanics and twitchy low-rez aesthetics of the original. Gameplay trailer is here; he put it in the public domain, and the code is all here on Gitlab.

Announcing Istio 1.6.14

This release contains bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.6.13 and Istio 1.6.14 Read more More:

  • ISTIO-SECURITY-2020-011
  • Support for Istio 1.6 has ended

    As previously announced, support for Istio 1.6 has now officially ended. At this point we will no longer back-port fixes for security issues and critical bugs to 1.6, so we heartily encourage you to upgrade to the latest version of Istio (1.8) if you haven’t already.

Moving into the future with the FSF tech team

The FSF is well-known for spearheading the advocacy and support of free software, not just by recommending it in the face of pervasive proprietary options, but also by condemning nonfree software altogether. Following this recommendation is hard, even for us, because of the ever-increasing dependency on software and computer networks that we are all subject to. To follow through with our commitment, our tech team maintains a large list of services that many other offices our size would have long ago been wrongly pressured into transferring to one of the handful of gigantic corporations that monopolize those services. Your work email account is most likely implemented through Gmail or Outlook; your office's software is likely to be served by Amazon Web Services, along with all the data backups; your company's customer service is likely to be managed through Salesforce or SAP, and so on. Make no mistake, this is true for your local government and school networks, too! In contrast, at the FSF, we never jumped on the outsourcing wagon, and we don't use any Service as a Software Substitute (SaaSS) in our operations. We run our own email servers, telephony and fax service, print shop, full server stack, backups, networking, systems monitoring, accounting, customer relationship management (CRM) software, and a long list of other tasks and software development projects, with a team of just four extremely dedicated technicians. And we implement this on hardware that has been carefully evaluated to meet very high ethical standards, criteria that we push for vendors to achieve through our "Respects Your Freedom" certification program. Read more