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Videos: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0, Enso OS 0.3.1, OpenShift and Upbound

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GNU
Linux
Interviews
  • OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 overview | The best! ...until OpenMandriva does better.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Enso OS 0.3.1 Run Through

    In this video, we look at Enso OS 0.3.1. Enjoy!

  • Video from KubeCon 2019: Red Hat in Barcelona

    From May 21-25, Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage rolled into KubeCon Europe 2019 in Barcelona, Spain, a rare chance to bring different parts of the Red Hat community together from across Europe and the U.S. While there, we took the opportunity to sit down with members of the teams that are shaping the next evolution of container native storage in Red Hat OpenShift and throughout the Kubernetes ecosystem.

    We’ve put together highlights from Barcelona, where you’ll see what happens when you gather 7,700 people from the Kubernetes ecosystem in one place. You’ll also hear from members of Red Hat’s team in Barcelona—Distinguished Engineer Ju Lim, Senior Architect Annette Clewett, Rook Senior Maintainer Travis Nielsen and others—about what’s exciting them now, and what’s ahead.

  • Bassam Tabbara: Next 10 Years Should Be About Open Cloud

    During KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, Barcelona, we sat down with Bassam Tabbara – CEO and founder of Upbound to talk about the company he is building to make the next decade about Open / Open Source Cloud, breaking away from the proprietary cloud. Tabbara shared his insights into how AWS, Azure and the rest leverage open source technologies to create the proprietary clouds. He wants to change that.

189 Lives Changed - By Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I've been at this business of putting Linux-powered computers into the homes of financially disadvantaged kids since 2005, one way or the other. That's 14 years and north of 1670 computers placed. Throughout those years, I've shared with you some of our successes, and spotlighted the indomitable spirit of the Free Open Source Community and The Linux Community as a whole. I've also shared with you the lowest of the low times for us, and me personally.

But through it all, Reglue has maintained our mission of placing first-time computers into the homes of financially disadvantaged students. By onesies and twosies mostly. A multi-machine learning center here and there, by far the greatest is the Bruno Knaapen Technology Learning Center. And as much of a challenge as that was, we have another project of even greater measure.

If you don't know who Bruno Knaapen is, I suggest you follow the link. Bruno will go down in history as a person who helped more people adapt to Linux than anyone, at any time. Bruno's online contributions are still a treasure trove of Linux knowledge. So much, individuals pay out of their pocket to make sure that information remains available. Going down that list, you will come to understand the tenacity and knowledge that man shared with his community. I was one of those that learned at his elbow.

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Official x86 Zhaoxin Processor Support Is Coming With Linux 5.3

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Linux

Zhaoxin is the company producing Chinese x86 CPUs created by a joint venture between VIA and the Shanghai government. The current Zhaoxin ZX CPUs are based on VIA's Isaiah design and making use of VIA's x86 license. With the Linux 5.3 kernel will be better support for these Chinese desktop x86 CPUs.

Future designs of the Zhaoxin processors call for 7nm manufacturing, PCI Express 4.0, DDR5, and other features to put it on parity with modern Intel and AMD CPUs. It remains to be seen how well that will work out, but certainly seems to be moving along in the desktop/consumer space for Chinese-built x86 CPUs while in the server space there's the Hygon Dhyana EPYC-based processors filling the space for Chinese servers.

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There's A Professional Grade Digital Cinema Camera Powered By Linux

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Linux

Digital camera startup Octopus Cinema has been designing the "OCTOPUSCAMERA" as a digital cinema camera that's professional grade yet is an open platform with removable/upgradeable parts and this camera platform itself is running Linux.

The OCTOPUSCAMERA supports up to 5K full frame recording, weighs less than 1kg, and is powered by Linux. It's a rather ambitious device and they aim to be shipping in 2020.

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Also: Old Linus Torvalds is back: Linux page caching sparks 'bulls**t' outburst [Ed: Anti-Linux writers of the CBS tabloid ZDNet are mobbing Torvalds into silence again]

Linux Package Managers Compared – AppImage vs Snap vs Flatpak

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Package managers provide a way of packaging, distributing, installing, and maintaining apps in an operating system. With modern desktop, server and IoT applications of the Linux operating system and the hundreds of different distros that exist, it becomes necessary to move away from platform specific packaging methods to platform agnostic ones. This post explores 3 such tools, namely AppImage, Snap and Flatpak, that each aim to be the future of software deployment and management in Linux. At the end we summarize a few key findings.

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Raspberry Pi 4 is here!

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Linux

The latest version of the Raspberry Pi—Raspberry Pi 4—was released today, earlier than anticipated, featuring a new 1.5GHz Arm chip and VideoCore GPU with some brand new additions: dual-HDMI 4K display output; USB3 ports; Gigabit Ethernet; and multiple RAM options up to 4GB.

The Raspberry Pi 4 is a very powerful single-board computer and starts at the usual price of $35. That gets you the standard 1GB RAM, or you can pay $45 for the 2GB model or $55 for the 4GB model—premium-priced models are a first for Raspberry Pi.

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Linux 5.2-rc6

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Linux

I really was hoping that we'd continue to have an increasingly quiet
and shrinking rc series. But that was not to be.

rc6 is the biggest rc in number of commits we've had so far for this
5.2 cycle (obviously ignoring the merge window itself and rc1). And
it's not just because of trivial patches (although admittedly we have
those too), but we obviously had the TCP SACK/fragmentation/mss fixes
in there, and they in turn required some fixes too.

Happily we did pick up on the problem quickly - largely thanks to the
patches making it into distro kernels quickly and then causing
problems for the steam client of all things - but it's still something
that doesn't exactly make me get the warm and fuzzies at this point in
the release cycle.

I'm also doing this rc on a Saturday, because I am going to spend all
of tomorrow on a plane once again. So I'm traveling first for a
conference and then for some R&R on a liveaboard, so I'm going to have
spotty access to email for a few days, and then for a week I'll be
entirely incommunicado. So rc7 will be delayed.

I was thinking that I timed it all really well in what should be the
quietest period of the release cycle for me, and now I obviously hope
that last week really was a fluke.

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Linux Foundation Leftovers

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Kernel: Rants, PulseAudio 12, Valve-Related Bug and Mesa 19.1.1 RC

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • 'Bulls%^t! Complete bull$h*t!' Reset the clock on the last time woke Linus Torvalds exploded at a Linux kernel dev

    Linux kernel chieftain Linus Torvalds owes the swear jar a few quid this week, although by his standards this most recent rant of his is relatively restrained.

    Over on the kernel development mailing list, in a long and involved thread about the functionality and efficiency of operating system page caches, firebrand-turned-woke Torvalds described Aussie programmer Dave Chinner’s arguments in the debate as "bullshit," "complete bullshit," and "obviously garbage."

    To be fair to the open-source overlord, this is a far less personal attack than previous outbursts, such as the time he slammed "some security people" as "just f#cking morons," or that unforgettable straight-to-the-point detonation: "Mauro, SHUT THE F**K UP."

  • It Looks Like PulseAudio 13.0 Will Be Releasing Soon

    It's been a year since the release of PulseAudio 12 and even eleven months since the last point release but it looks like the next PulseAudio release will be out very soon.

    The next PulseAudio release has been under discussion with the sorting out of when the release will take place and any blocker bugs. As it stands now, there is just one blocker bug remaining and that is addressing a regression.

  • A One Line Kernel Patch Appears To Solve The Recent Linux + Steam Networking Regression

    As a follow-up to the issue reported on Friday regarding the latest Linux kernel releases causing problems for Valve's Steam client, a fix appears pending that with changing around one line of code does appear to address the regression.

    Linus Torvalds got involved and pointed out a brand new kernel patch that may solve the issue. That patch was quickly reaffirmed by Linux gamers as well as prominent Valve Linux developer Pierre-Loup A. Griffais.

  • Mesa 19.1.1 release candidate
    Hello list,
    
    The candidate for the Mesa 19.1.1 is now available. Currently we have:
     - 27 queued
     - 0 nominated (outstanding)
     - and 0 rejected patch
    
    
    The current queue consists mostly in fixes for different drivers (RADV, ANV,
    Nouveau, Virgl, V3D, R300g, ...)
    
    The queue also contains different fixes for different parts (Meson build, GLX,
    etc).
    
    Take a look at section "Mesa stable queue" for more information
    
    
    Testing reports/general approval
    --------------------------------
    Any testing reports (or general approval of the state of the branch) will be
    greatly appreciated.
    
    The plan is to have 19.1.1 this Tuesday (25th June), around or shortly after
    10:00 GMT.
    
    If you have any questions or suggestions - be that about the current patch queue
    or otherwise, please go ahead.
    
    
    Trivial merge conflicts
    -----------------------
    commit 25a34df61439b25645d03510d6354cb1f5e8a185
    Author: Kenneth Graunke 
    
        iris: Fix iris_flush_and_dirty_history to actually dirty history.
    
        (cherry picked from commit 64fb20ed326fa0e524582225faaa4bb28f6e4349)
    
    
    Cheers,
        J.A.
    
  • Mesa 19.1.1 Is Coming Next Week With A Variety Of Fixes

    Debuting two weeks ago was the Mesa 19.1 quarterly feature update while due out early next week is the first bug-fix point release.

    Mesa 19.1 is a huge update over 19.0 and earlier. Mesa 19.1 brought multiple new Gallium3D drivers as well as a new Vulkan driver (TURNIP), performance optimizations, new Vulkan extensions, mature Icelake support, and a variety of other features as listed in the aforelinked article.

Enso OS, A Desktop Mix between Xubuntu and elementary OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Enso OS is a relatively new GNU/Linux distro based on Ubuntu with XFCE desktop coupled with Gala Window Manager. Looking at Enso is like looking at a mix between Xubuntu and elementary OS. It features a Super key start menu called Panther and a global menu on its top panel, making the interface very interesting to try. This overview briefly highlights the user interface for you.

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Programming Leftovers

  • Intel Is Working On A New ‘Data Parallel C++’ Programming Language

    ntel has been working on its OneAPI project for quite some time. The company has now shared more details of the software project — including the launch of a new programming language called “Data Parallel C++ (DPC++).”

  • 6 Best Data Science and Machine Learning Courses for Beginners

    Many programmers are moving towards data science and machine learning hoping for better pay and career opportunities --- and there is a reason for it. The Data scientist has been ranked the number one job on Glassdoor for last a couple of years and the average salary of a data scientist is over** $120,000** in the United States according to Indeed. Data science is not only a rewarding career in terms of money but it also provides the opportunity for you to solve some of the world's most interesting problems. IMHO, that's the main motivation many good programmers are moving towards data science, machine learning and artificial intelligence.

  • Find the smallest number within a list with python

    In this example, we will create a python function which will take in a list of numbers and then return the smallest value. The solution to this problem is first to create a place holder for the first number within the list, then compares that number with other numbers within the same list in the loop. If the program found a number which is smaller than the one in the place holder, then the smaller number will be assigned to that place holder.

  • Basic Input, Output, and String Formatting in Python

    To be useful, a program usually needs to communicate with the outside world by obtaining input data from the user and displaying result data back to the user. This tutorial will introduce you to Python input and output. Input may come directly from the user via the keyboard, or from some external source like a file or database. Output can be displayed directly to the console or IDE, to the screen via a Graphical User Interface (GUI), or again to an external source.

  • Want to level up your Python? Join Weekly Python Exercise, starting July 2nd

    Let’s face it: Stack Overflow has made developers’ lives easier. Almost every time I have a question, I find that someone on Stack Overflow has asked it, and that people have answered it, often in great detail. I’m thus not against Stack Overflow, not by a long shot. But I have found that many Python developers visit there 10 or even 20 times a day, to find answers (and even code) that they can use to solve their problems.

  • Introducing pytest-elk-reporter

    Few years back I’ve wrote a post about how I’ve connected python based test to ELK setup - “ELK is fun”, it was using an xunit xml, parsing it and sending it via Logstash. Over time I’ve learn a lot about ElasticSearch and it’s friend Kibana, using them as a tool to handle logs. and also as a backend for a search component on my previous job. So now I know logstash isn’t needed for reporting test result, posting straight into elasticsearch is easier and gives you better control, ES is doing anything “automagiclly” anyhow nowadays.

Graphics: Weston 6.0.1, GPUs in OpenStack, Panfrost and Vulkan

  • weston 6.0.1
    Weston 6.0.1 is released with build system fixes to smooth the
    transition to Meson. Other miscellaneous bugfixes are also included.
    
    Note that the PGP signing key has changed to 0FDE7BE0E88F5E48.
    
    - (1):
          zunitc: Fix undeclared identifier 'NULL'
    
    Alexandros Frantzis (1):
          clients/simple-dmabuf-egl: Properly check for error in gbm_bo_get_handle_for_plane
    
    Antonio Borneo (2):
          clients: close unused keymap fd
          log: remove "%m" from format strings by using strerror(errno)
    
    Daniel Stone (2):
          weston: Properly test for output-creation failure
          compositor: Don't ignore --use-pixman for Wayland backend
    
    Fabrice Fontaine (1):
          Fix build with kernel < 4.4
    
    Harish Krupo (4):
          meson.build: Fix warning for configure_file
          window.c: Don't assume registry advertisement order
          data-device: send INVALID_FINISH when operation != dnd
          Fix: clients/window: Premature finish request when copy-pasting
    
    Kamal Pandey (1):
          FIX: weston: clients: typo in simple-dmabuf-egl.c
    
    Luca Weiss (1):
          Fix incorrect include
    
    Marius Vlad (3):
          meson.build/libweston: Fix clang warning for export-dynamic
          compositor: Fix invalid view numbering in scene-graph
          compositor: Fix missing new line when displaying buffer type for EGL buffer
    
    Pekka Paalanen (7):
          meson: link editor with gobject-2.0
          meson: link cms-colord with glib and gobject
          meson: link remoting with glib and gobject
          meson: DRM-backend demands GBM
          meson: dep fix for compositor.h needing xkbcommon.h
          build: add missing dep to x11 backend
          libweston: fix protocol install path
    
    Scott Anderson (1):
          compositor: Fix incorrect use of bool options
    
    Sebastian Wick (1):
          weston-terminal: Fix weston-terminal crash on mutter
    
    Silva Alejandro Ismael (1):
          compositor: fix segfaults if wl_display_create fails
    
    Simon Ser (1):
          build: bump to version 6.0.1 for the point release
    
    Tomohito Esaki (1):
          cairo-util: Don't set title string to Pango layout if the title is NULL
    
    git tag: 6.0.1
    
  • Wayland's Weston 6.0.1 Released With Build System Fixes & Other Corrections

    Weston 6.0 was released back in March with a remote/streaming plug-in and Meson becoming the preferred build system among other improvements. Weston 6.0.1 was released today by Simon Ser with various fixes to this reference Wayland compositor. Weston 6.0.1 is mostly made up of Meson build system fixes/improvements to ensure a good Meson experience. There is also a fix for building with pre-4.4 kernels and a variety of other smaller fixes.

  • OpenStack Stein feature highlights: vGPU support coming in Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15

    Red Hat is working on the next release of the supported enterprise distribution of OpenStack, Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15, based on the Stein community release. In this multi-part blog series, we’ll be examining some of the features that Red Hat and the open source community have collaborated on–starting with a look to future workloads, such as artificial intelligence. "How does OpenStack enable next generation workloads?" you ask. When it comes to computer-driven decision making, machine learning algorithms can provide adaptable services that can get better over time. Some of these workloads, such as facial recognition, require GPUs to ingest and process graphical data in real time. But the more powerful GPUs often used for machine learning and such are expensive, power-hungry, and can take up a lot of room in the servers' chassis. When working with GPUs at scale, optimized utilization is key to more cost effective machine learning.

  • Panfrost Gallium3D Picks Up Yet More Features Thanks To Collabora's Summer Internship

    Just a few days ago I wrote how the Panfrost Gallium3D driver continues making incredible progress for this community-driven, open-source graphics driver targeting Arm Bifrost/Midgard graphics. There's yet another batch of new features and improvements to talk about. Most of this feature work continues to be done by Panfrost lead developer Alyssa Rosenzweig who is interning at Collabora this summer and appears to be spending most of her time working on this reverse-engineered Arm graphics driver supporting their recent generations of IP.

  • Vulkan 1.1.112 Released While Open-Source ANV + RADV Drivers Continue Marching Along

    Vulkan 1.1.112 was outed this morning as the newest documentation update to this high performance graphics and compute API. Vulkan 1.1.112 is quite a mundane update with just documentation corrections and clarifications this go around and not any new extensions. But at least the clarifications should help out some and other maintenance items addressed by this Vulkan 1.1.112 release. It's not a surprise the release is so small considering Vulkan 1.1.111 was issued just two weeks ago.

today's howtos

5 Best and Free Desktop Email Clients for Linux and Windows

If you are looking for free Email clients for Linux and Windows – here are 5 of them we list which you can try and consider for casual or professional uses. Web based email is popular today which can be accessed via browser or mobile apps. However, big and medium enterprises, generic users still prefers native desktop email clients for heavy and office uses. Microsoft Outlook is the most popular desktop email client which is of course not free and you have to pay huge licence fee to use. There are multiple options for free desktop email clients available. Here are the best 5 free and open source email clients which you can go ahead and try then deploy for your needs. Read more