Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

When Linux required installation parties

Filed under
Linux

I studied math in college. Back then, ordinarily, math students didn't have access to the computer lab; pen and paper were all we needed to do our work. But for my one required programming class, I got access to the college computer lab.

It was running SunOS with remote X terminals (this was circa 1996). I immediately fell in love with Unix. I fell in love with the command line, X Windows, the utilities—all of it.

When the class ended, I lost my access. A friend told me about this thing called Linux, where you could install a Unix operating system on your own PC. Back then, installing Slackware on your PC was non-trivial.

Read more

Snake your way across your Linux terminal

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Welcome back to the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. It's hard to say exactly, but my definition is anything that helps you have fun at the terminal.

We've been on a roll with games over the weekend, and it was fun, so let's look at one more game today, Snake!

Snake is an oldie but goodie; versions of it have been around seemingly forever. The first version I remember playing was one called Nibbles that came packaged with QBasic in the 1990s, and was probably pretty important to my understanding of what a programming language even was. Here I had the source code to a game that I could modify and just see what happens, and maybe learn something about what all of those funny little words that made up a programming language were all about.

Read more

Growing Your Small Business With An Affordable OS

Filed under
OS
Linux

Your small business needs to grow, there's no doubt about that. Expansion is the name of the game when you have a one or two man company, and you're going to want to bring on at least 20 or more people to really get the cogs grinding. And if you're working on a digital interface, slowly phasing pen and paper out of the office you operate in, you're going to need plenty of people around to oil the engine and keep the tech in a usable state.

Because of this, technology helps your small business grow, and can do quite a few wonders for the time and effort you invested into it. Even if you're working on a minimal budget, there's quite a few option to look into to make sure you've got just as much of a chance as the shop next door to you that seems to have a never ending stream of customers. After all, you've got to get your internal processes working perfectly first, and with a bit of technological aid, you might manage that faster than you first thought.

Read more

Linux 4.20-rc6

Filed under
Linux

Hmm. Things look fairly normal. just under half of the patch is to
drivers (gpu, networking, nvdimm, block, media..), with the rest being
tooling (mostly bpf selftests) core networking, documentation and some
arch updates, Some filesystem, core kernel and mm fixes in there too
(we've had some last-minute THP reverts and discussion for how to
re-do it next time).

Most of it looks pretty small and normal. Would I have preferred for
there to be less churn? Yes. But it's certainly smaller than rc5 was,
so we're moving in the right direction, and we have at least one more
rc to go.

I say "at least", not because I'm particularly worried about the
technical details and any outstanding bugs, but because of the whole
holiday season timing. I still suspect that what I'll do is release
4.20 just before xmas (so with the usual "rc7->final" cadence) but
then just leave a dead week for the holiday season. Again encouraging
everybody to send in their pull request for the merge window *before*
the holiday season, but I might just either ignore them for a week, or
take it very slow and easy.

And of course, if we have something worrisome come up, any technical
issues can derail that plan, but I don't think there's anything bad
pending now.

Linus

Read more

Also: Linux 4.20-rc6 Kernel Released - "Looks Fairly Normal"

Editorial: An open letter to Valve on why they should keep on embracing Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

News in the last week, heck, in the last few weeks and months have the potential to shake up the games industry significantly. It certainly may have huge repercussions for Linux gaming. It’s also been a little hard to follow sometimes, so I decided to explain many of the developments of the past few months and put them within an easy-to-understand context.

Read more

Here's The Best Linux Distro For Your Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Extreme

Filed under
Linux

When I evaluate any combination of hardware and operating system, my goal is to have 100% out-of-the-box functionality and start testing. That's a demand I place on both Windows and Linux. I'm currently in the process of reviewing Lenovo's ThinkPad X1 Extreme (watch for separate Windows 10 and Linux reviews), but in the interim wanted to share my experience installing a few different Linux distributions on it. Beyond that, I want to provide an enthusiastic recommendation for X1 Extreme users wanting the easiest desktop Linux experience right out of the box.

Read more

Top 20 Best Tizen Apps for November 2018

Filed under
Linux

Once again, we’re here with the monthly rundown of the most downloaded apps from the Tizen Store. As usual, the month of November 2018 also didn’t bring any BIG good news for the Tizen smartphone users, except for a WhatsApp update. WhatsApp for Tizen got a relatively huge update early in November which helped the App grab a firm hold in the top spot of the most downloaded apps list once again.

Facebook, despite lacking features its Android and iOS counterparts boast, remains the second most downloaded app. Facebook Messenger, meanwhile, is back at third after temporarily losing the spot to a new game, Counter Terror: Pursuit, in October. Below is the list of the top 20 most downloaded apps.

Read more

The 5 Best Linux Distros for Laptops

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Maybe you’ve just purchased a brand new laptop. Or maybe you have an older laptop sitting in your closet that you’d like to bring back to life. Either way, the best Linux distros for laptops are those that offer better driver support and can accommodate the performance offered by most laptops.

People buy laptops for a specific purpose. That may be software development, creating graphic content, gaming, or office work. The Linux distros below are well suited to run on any laptop.

Read more

High Resolution Scroll-Wheel Support Re-Added Ahead Of Linux 4.21

Filed under
Linux

After a short-lived experience on Linux 4.20 when it was added and then reverted due to fallout, the reworked high-resolution scroll-wheel support will re-premiere with Linux 4.21.

This high-resolution scroll wheel support is intended to provide a "smoother" scrolling experience on newer mice, particularly those from Microsoft and Logitech. Windows has supported high resolution scrolling with these mice while Linux had not. A few days back I wrote about the reworked HID implementation going through its patch review process and now that material is queued in HID-Next.

Read more

Also: Automotive Grade Linux Booth at CES 2019 Showcases Amazon Alexa Integration, 2019 Toyota RAV4, and 20 Open Source Automotive Demos

Intel's OpenGL Driver Will Now Make Better Use Of KHR_debug For Shader Debugging

Linux 4.19.8 Released With BLK-MQ Fix To The Recent Data Corruption Bug

Filed under
Linux

Hopefully you can set aside some time this weekend to upgrade to Linux 4.19.8 as there's the BLK-MQ fix in place for the recent "EXT4 corruption issue" that was plaguing many users of Linux 4.19.

Greg Kroah-Hartman just released a number of stable kernel point releases. Linux 4.19.8 has just some minor additions like supporting the ELAN0621 touchpad, quirking all PDP Xbox One gamepads for better support, and some minor fixes... Linux 4.19.8 wouldn't be worthy of a shout-out had it not been for Jens Axboe's BLK-MQ patches part of this release.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Snake your way across your Linux terminal

Welcome back to the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. It's hard to say exactly, but my definition is anything that helps you have fun at the terminal. We've been on a roll with games over the weekend, and it was fun, so let's look at one more game today, Snake! Snake is an oldie but goodie; versions of it have been around seemingly forever. The first version I remember playing was one called Nibbles that came packaged with QBasic in the 1990s, and was probably pretty important to my understanding of what a programming language even was. Here I had the source code to a game that I could modify and just see what happens, and maybe learn something about what all of those funny little words that made up a programming language were all about. Read more

Growing Your Small Business With An Affordable OS

Your small business needs to grow, there's no doubt about that. Expansion is the name of the game when you have a one or two man company, and you're going to want to bring on at least 20 or more people to really get the cogs grinding. And if you're working on a digital interface, slowly phasing pen and paper out of the office you operate in, you're going to need plenty of people around to oil the engine and keep the tech in a usable state. Because of this, technology helps your small business grow, and can do quite a few wonders for the time and effort you invested into it. Even if you're working on a minimal budget, there's quite a few option to look into to make sure you've got just as much of a chance as the shop next door to you that seems to have a never ending stream of customers. After all, you've got to get your internal processes working perfectly first, and with a bit of technological aid, you might manage that faster than you first thought. Read more

Security: Polkit, CSP, Ansible and Router Hardening Checklist

  • Polkit CVE-2018-19788 vs. SELinux
  • Why is your site not using Content Security Policy / CSP?
    Yesterday, I had the pleasure of watching on Frikanalen the OWASP talk by Scott Helme titled "What We’ve Learned From Billions of Security Reports". I had not heard of the Content Security Policy standard nor its ability to "call home" when a browser detect a policy breach (I do not follow web page design development much these days), and found the talk very illuminating. The mechanism allow a web site owner to use HTTP headers to tell visitors web browser which sources (internal and external) are allowed to be used on the web site. Thus it become possible to enforce a "only local content" policy despite web designers urge to fetch programs from random sites on the Internet, like the one enabling the attack reported by Scott Helme earlier this year.
  • Red Hat Ansible Playbooks Password Exposure Vulnerability [CVE-2018-16859]
    CVE-2018-16859. A vulnerability in Red Hat Ansible could allow a local attacker to discover plaintext passwords on a targeted system.
  • Router Hardening Checklist