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Docker Images Are Moving From Ubuntu To Alpine Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Docker is reportedly going to be migrating all of their official images from an Ubuntu base to now using Alpine Linux.

Alpine Linux is the lightweight distribution built atop musl libc and BusyBox while using a GrSecurity-enhanced Linux kernel. Alpine Linux uses OpenRC as its init system. If you are unfamiliar with this "Small. Simple. Secure." distribution, you can learn more via AlpineLinux.org. The image for Alpine is a mere 5MB.

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Also: Docker Founders Hire Alpine Linux Developer to Move the Official Images to Ubuntu

Ubuntu 6.06 To Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Performance Benchmarks: 10 Years Of Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

As I'm in the process of retiring an old AMD Opteron dual-socket system, prior to decommissioning it, I figured it would be fun to go back and re-benchmark all of the Ubuntu LTS releases going all the way back to the legendary 6.06 Dapper Drake release. So here are some fresh benchmarks of this AMD Shanghai system with eight cores and 16GB of RAM when re-benchmarking the releases from Ubuntu 6.06 through the latest Ubuntu 16.04 LTS development state.

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The Talos Secure Workstation Is A High-Performance Libre System

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Raptor Engineering is working on the Talos Secure Workstation, which is being advertised as a high-performance, open-to-the-firmware system that is much better than the commonly antiquated "freed" x86 systems. However, getting a high-performance, free software friendly workstation doesn't come cheap.

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Samsung begins updating Z1 Smartphone in India to Tizen 2.4 – version Z130HDDU0CPB1

Filed under
Linux

Today, we have some good news for our Samsung Z1 readers that are based in India, as their Z1 Smartphones begin receiving the much awaited final release of the Tizen 2.4 Operating System update version Z130HDDU0CPB1. The update will be delivered Over the Air (OTA), so will either use your WiFi or network providers cellular data. It is advised to use WiFi as the update is pretty big. For Tizen 2.3 users the size of the update from BOK2(2.3) is ~262MB. For Tizen 2.4 Beta users who are on COL6 the size of the update is ~17MB.

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Example Uses Of The Linux grep Command

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

The Linux grep command is used as a method for filtering input.

GREP stands for Global Regular Expression Printer and therefore in order to use it effectively you should have some knowledge about regular expressions.

In this article I am going to show you a number of examples which will help you understand the grep command.

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Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

Filed under
Linux
  • Unikernels

    When Linux applications have bugs that are difficult to diagnose (EG buffer overruns that happen in production and can’t be reproduced in a test environment) there are a variety of ways of debugging them. Tools such as Valgrind can analyse memory access and tell the developers which code had a bug and what the bug does. It’s theoretically possible to link something like Valgrind into a Unikernel, but the lack of multiple processes would make it difficult to manage.

  • Robert Hallock: GPUOpen is AMD’s Long-Term Open Source Strategy

    Last week AMD completed a major step in its initiative to open things up to the public under GPUOpen — a collection of tools for graphics, high performance compute and heterogeneous computing – as open source under the MIT license model. So when a company does something out of the ordinary, especially one with a large indirect influence in the mobile community, it’s worth looking further into it. I recently had the opportunity to speak with Robert Hallock, AMD’s Head of Global Technical Marketing, and ask a few questions about what this all means.

  • A Ton Of Direct3D 9 "Nine" State Tracker Improvements Hit Mesa
  • xf86-video-geode 2.11.18

    Yesterday, I pushed out version 2.11.18 of the Geode X.Org driver. This is the driver used by the OLPC XO-1 and by a plethora of low-power desktops, micro notebooks and thin clients. This release mostly includes maintenance fixes of all sorts. Of noticeable interest is a fix for the long-standing issue that switching between X and a VT would result in a blank screen (this should probably be cherry-picked for distributions running earlier releases of this driver). Many thanks to Connor Behan for the fix!

An Introduction to SELinux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Way back in kernel 2.6, a new security system was introduced to provide a mechanism for supporting access control security policies. This system was Security Enhanced Linux (SELinux) and was introduced by the National Security Administration (NSA) to incorporate a strong Mandatory Access Control architecture into the subsystems of the Linux kernel.

If you’ve spent your entire Linux career either disabling or ignoring SELinux, this article is dedicated to you — an introduction to the system that lives “under the hood” of your Linux desktop or server to limit privilege or even eliminate the possibility of damage should programs or daemons become compromised.

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Linux Benchmarks Of The C.H.I.P. $9 Computer

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

While Next Thing Co is still working to fulfill orders on the C.H.I.P. $9 computer over the next several months, I noticed that some benchmarks of this cheap Raspberry Pi competitor have begun appearing on OpenBenchmarking.org via the Phoronix Test Suite. Here are some of those benchmark results for this ARB single-board computer.

For those that don't recall this crowd-funding campaign, the C.H.I.P. is a $9 computer with a 1GHz ARM single-core processor, 512MB of RAM, and 4GB of storage. The C.H.I.P. is cheap. I hadn't paid much attention to the campaign since I'm more into high-performance ARM chips than whatever the cheapest ARM SBC is around. However, these early benchmark results on OpenBenchmarking.org are rather interesting.

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MaruOS claims to turn your Android phone into a Linux desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Odds are that the smartphone in your pocket is powerful enough to run some desktop apps like office suites, web browsers, and other productivity tools. But the software on most phones is designed for mobile devices, not desktop screens.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Leftovers: Software

today's howtos

Phoronix on NVIDIA

  • Compute Shader Support Patches For NVIDIA Fermi On Nouveau
    Samuel Pitoiset has published a set of twelve patches for implementing compute shaders support within the Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D driver for the GeForce 400/500 "Fermi" graphics processors.
  • NVIDIA Posts Latest PRIME Sync Patches On Road To Better Support
    Alex Goins of NVIDIA has spent the past several months working on PRIME synchronization support to fix tearing when using this NVIDIA-popular multi-GPU method. The latest patches were published this week.
  • The Best Graphics Card Brands For NVIDIA/AMD GPUs As A Linux Consumer?
    One of the most frequent topics I'm emailed about is any brand recommendations among NVIDIA and AMD AIB partners for graphics cards. For Linux users, is there a particular brand preference for graphics cards? The short story is, no, there isn't one particular brand when selecting either a GeForce or Radeon graphics card that a Linux gamer/enthusiast should go with over another AIB partner. Over the past 12 years of running Phoronix, there has been no single AIB partner that superbly stands out compared to the rest when it comes to graphics card AIB partner brands like ASUS, Zotac, HIS, MSI, etc. They all work under Linux, rarely the AIB differences extend beyond the heatsink/cooler and any default clock speed differences, and I haven't seen one that's over-the-top crazy about Linux. I also haven't seen any major partner consistently put the Tux logo or other Linux markings on their product packaging, let alone incorporate any Linux drivers onto their CD/DVD driver media.