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Linux

Linux 4.15 Development Updates

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Development
Linux

5 Coolest Linux Terminal Emulators

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Linux

Sure, we can get by with boring old GNOME terminal, Konsole, and funny, rickety, old xterm. When you're in the mood to try something new, however, take a look at these five cool and useful Linux terminals.

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MX 17 Linux: The Best of 2 Linux Worlds

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Linux
Reviews

MX-17 Beta 1 images are available for download here. If you are looking for a computing platform that is a bit different and very reliable, check out the latest MX 17 Beta releases. Try out the various installation options. See how they work on your slowest legacy hardware.

If you like what you see, keep using the Beta release on USB until the final release of MX 17 comes out shortly. Then you can install it to your computer's hard drive in frugal mode, keep your existing Linux distro where it is, and choose which one to run with each new boot-up.

The beauty of MX Linux is you do not have to deal with wiping or partitioning your hard drive or fussing with the unpredictability of maintaining a dual-boot setup.

MX Linux is a powerful, easy-to-use computing platform that goes beyond lightweight performance without filling your computer with software bloat.

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Raspberry Pi 3 clone offers Allwinner H2, H3, or H5 SoCs for $9 to $29

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Linux

Libre Computer’s open source “Tritium” SBCs run Ubuntu or Android on Allwinner H2+, H3, or 64-bit H5 SoCs, and have an RPi 3 like layout and 40-pin header.

Earlier this year, Shenzhen-based Libre Computer successfully funded its quad Cortex-A53 Amlogic S905X based Le Potato SBC on Kickstarter for $25 to $35. Now, the company has returned to Kickstarter to launch a second hacker SBC with a Raspberry 3-like form factor, layout, and 40-pin expansion interface. The Tritium is available in packages of $9, $19, or $29, depending on whether you want it configured with the Allwinner H2+, Allwinner H3, or Allwinner H5.

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Wandboard.org launches i.MX8M-based SBC with RPi expansion

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Android
Linux
Ubuntu

Technexion’s Wandboard.org unveiled open source “Wand-Pi-8M” SBCs that run Linux on a quad-A53 i.MX8M, and offer WiFi/BT, GbE, HDMI 2.0, and a 40-pin RPi link.

Technexion and its Wandboard.org community project opened pre-orders on three successors to its i.MX6 based Wandboard and almost identical Wandboard Reload SBCs that tap NXP’s long awaited, quad-core, Cortex-A53 i.MX8M SoC. Unlike the Wandboards, the smaller, Raspberry Pi like (85 x 56 x 19.3mm) Wand-Pi-8M-Lite ($89), Wand-Pi-8M-Pro ($99), and Wand-Pi-8M-Deluxe ($119), are standard SBCs rather than sandwich-style COM-and-carrier products. The boards ship in Spring 2018.

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GNU/Linux in HPC

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GNU
Linux
Server

GNU/Linux World Domination (in HPC)

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GNU
Linux
Server
  • China moves ahead of US on Top 500 supercomputer list; Linux now found on every machine

    The bi-annual Top 500 supercomputer list has reached its fiftieth edition, bringing with it two important milestones: China has more machines on the list than the US, and every computer now runs Linux.

    Boasting 202 entries, China can now claim more supercomputers in the top 500 than ever before. At the same time, the US has its lowest number of places—144—since the list began 25 years ago. Back in June, China took 159 spots while the US led with 169.

  • It took 19 years, but Linux finally dominates an entire market

    LINUX MAY well still be viewed as the preserve of 'hobbyists', but there's one category of devices in which Linux rules the market: supercomputers. 

    According to ZDNet, it's the first time that Linux systems have taken all 500 spots in the TOP500 Supercomputer list - with the last two non-Linux supercomputers dropping off between the lists released in June and November of this year.

Attacks on GNU/Linux and Openwashing, E.E.E.

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Devices: Tizen, Android, QEMU Bridge

Filed under
Android
Linux
  • TV4 to bring Advertising Video on Demand Apps to Samsung Smart TVs

    As times change, the way we consume television content has been changing too. Cable TVs, Satellite broadcasts, Direct to Home and now internet streams thanks to the faster internet and Smart TVs have all made it easier to watch content that we like. One company that has been evolving with time to deliver better content is the popular Swedish commercial broadcaster TV4 which is a part of Bonnier Group.

  • Register here for Samsung’s webinar on how Tizen wearables can improve Enterprise productivity
  • An update on the Android problem

    Android has been a great boon to the kernel community, having brought a great deal of growth in both the user and the development communities. But Android has also been a problem in that devices running it ship with kernels containing large amounts (often millions of lines) of out-of-tree code. That fragments the development community and makes it impossible to run mainline kernels on this hardware. The problematic side of Android was discussed at the 2017 Maintainer Summit; the picture that resulted is surprisingly optimistic.

    Greg Kroah-Hartman started by saying that he has been working for some time with the system-on-chip (SoC) vendors to try to resolve this problem, which he blames primarily on Qualcomm for having decided not to work upstream. Qualcomm has since concluded that this decision was a mistake and is determined to fix it, but the process of doing so will take years. The other SoC vendors are also committed to closing the gap between the kernels they provide and the mainline but, again, getting there will take a while.

  •  

  • Hardware and Software Engineers Designing SoC FPGAs Stand to Profit from Aldec QEMU Bridge
  • QEMU 2.11-RC1 Released: Drops IA64, Adds OpenRISC SMP & More

    QEMU 2.11-RC1 is available for this important piece of the open-source Linux virtualization stack.

    - Dropped support for IA64 Itanium architecture. Also being dropped with QEMU 2.11 is AIX support.

LWN: Realtime Summit, Maintainers Summit and More (Paywall Expired)

Filed under
Linux
  • A report from the Realtime Summit

    The 2017 Realtime Summit (RT-Summit) was hosted by the Czech Technical University on Saturday, October 21 in Prague, just before the Embedded Linux Conference. It was attended by more than 50 individuals with backgrounds ranging from academic to industrial, and some local students daring enough to spend a day with that group. What follows is a summary of some of the presentations held at the event.

  • USBGuard: authorization for USB

    USBGuard is a security framework for the authorization of USB devices that can be plugged into a Linux system. For users who want to protect a system from malicious USB devices or unauthorized use of USB ports on a machine, this program gives a number of fine-grained policy options for specifying how USB devices can interact with a host system. It is a tool similar to usbauth, which also provides an interface to create access-control policies for the USB ports. Although kernel authorization for USB devices already exists, programs like USBGuard make it easy to craft policies using those mechanisms.

  • A kernel self-testing update

    Shuah Khan is the maintainer of the kernel's self-test subsystem. At the 2017 Kernel Summit, she presented an update on the recent developments in kernel testing and led a related discussion. Much work has happened around self-testing in the kernel, but there remains a lot to be done.

  • Kernel regression tracking, part 2

    The tracking of kernel regressions was discussed at the 2017 Kernel Summit; the topic made a second appearance at the first-ever Maintainers Summit two days later. This session was partly a repeat of what came before for the benefit of those (including Linus Torvalds) who weren't at the first discussion, but some new ground was covered as well.

    Thorsten Leemhuis started with a reprise of the Kernel Summit discussion, noting that he has been doing regression tracking for the last year and has found it to be rather harder than he had expected. The core of the problem, he said, is that nobody tells him anything about outstanding regressions or the progress that has been made in fixing them, forcing him to dig through the lists to discover that information on his own. He had, though, come to a few conclusions on how he wants to proceed.

  • Bash the kernel maintainers

    Laurent Pinchart ran a session at the 2017 Embedded Linux Conference Europe entitled "Bash the kernel maintainers"; the idea was to get feedback from developers on their experience working with the kernel community. A few days later, the Maintainers Summit held a free-flowing discussion on the issues that were brought up in that session. Some changes may result from this discussion, but it also showed how hard it can be to change how kernel subsystem maintainers work.

    The first complaint was that there is no consistency in how maintainers respond to patches. Some will acknowledge them right away, others take their time, and others will sometimes ignore patches altogether. James Bottomley defended the last group, saying that it is simply not possible to respond to all of the patches that show up on the mailing lists. The discussions can get nasty or, with some posters, a maintainer can end up stuck in a never-ending circle of questions and reposts. Arnd Bergmann suggested that maintainers could adopt a standard no-reply reply for such situations.

  • The state of Linus

    A traditional Kernel-Summit agenda item was a slot where Linus Torvalds had the opportunity to discuss the aspects of the development community that he was (or, more often, was not) happy with. In 2017, this discussion moved to the smaller Maintainers Summit. Torvalds is mostly content with the state of the community, it seems, but the group still found plenty of process-related things to talk about.

    The kernel development process is going well, with one big exception, Torvalds said: developers still seem unable to distinguish the merge window from the period after -rc1 is released and he doesn't understand why. An extreme example was the MIPS subsystem which, as a result, was not merged at all for two release cycles. Most of the issues are not so extreme, but the problem is ongoing.

  • Maintainers Summit: SPDX, cross-subsystem development, and conclusion

    The 2017 Maintainers Summit, the first event of its type, managed to cover a wide range of topics in a single half-day. This article picks up a few relatively short topics that were discussed toward the end of the session. These include a new initiative to add SPDX license tags to the kernel, the perils of cross-subsystem development, and an evaluation of the summit itself.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: AMDGPU, Radeon, Intel DRM

  • AMDGPU DC Code Lands For Linux 4.15 Kernel
    Linus Torvalds has accepted the AMDGPU DC display code pull request for the Linux 4.15 kernel. AMD Linux users can now rejoice! Overnight David Airlie sent in the AMDGPU DC pull request for Linux 4.15 and since then Linus Torvalds was active on the kernel mailing list ranting about AMD header files and other unrelated to DC code. He was also pulling in other PRs... It was getting a bit worrisome, given the DC code not being in pristine shape, but it was exciting as heck to see this evening that he did go ahead and pull in the 132 thousand lines of new kernel code to land this AMDGPU DC. Linus hasn't provided any commentary about DC on the kernel mailing list as of writing.
  • Radeon VCN Encode Support Lands In Mesa 17.4 Git
    It's an exciting day for open-source Radeon Linux users today as besides the AMDGPU DC pull request (albeit still unmerged as of writing), Radeon VCN encoding support has landed in Mesa Git.
  • The - Hopefully - Final Stab At Intel Fastboot Support
    Intel's Maarten Lankhorst has sent out what could be the final patches for enabling "fastboot" support by default within their DRM graphics driver.

Raspberry Digital Signage 10

It shows web pages from Internet, LAN or internal sources (a WordPress installation comes already installed by default on the SD card); there is no way to escape this view but rebooting the machine. Marco Buratto has released Raspberry Digital Signage 10.0 today, which comes with the latest and greatest Chromium build (featuring advanced HTML5 capabilities, Adobe Flash support and H264/AVC video acceleration), so you can display more attractive resources, more easily. Read more

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