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Linux Foundation's Work on SPDX and Work for Microsoft

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
  • SPDX clears confusion around software licenses

    Around this time every year, our minds turn to copyright. Or maybe they turn more to copyright. After all, open source works because of copyright law. As you may already know, copyright laws give the authors of works the exclusive right to copy (among other things) their work. These rights attach as soon as the work is fixed in a tangible medium (written down, saved to disk, etc.). So the rights that open source licenses grant rely on copyright law.

    But what rights are specifically granted? That depends on which license the developer selects. Most projects use one of a few standard licenses, but they're not always clearly communicated. For example, a project may be released under "the GNU General Public License (GPL)." But which version? And can the recipient choose a later version if they wish?

    The Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) is a Linux Foundation project to help reduce the ambiguity of software by defining standards for reporting information. The license is one such piece of information. SPDX provides a format for listing the specific license variant and version that applies to a software package. With over 300 licenses, you're likely to find the one you use. The License List contains a human-friendly name, a short name, and a link to the full license text. SPDX also provides guidelines for matching the text of a license file to the official text of the license.

  • The Linux Foundation announces Linux on Azure training course to speed with Linux and vice versa

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced on Thursday the availability of a new training course, LFS205 – Administering Linux on Azure.

    A large number of the virtual machines running in Azure are utilizing the Linux operating system. Both Linux and Azure professionals should make sure they know how to manage Linux workloads in an Azure environment as this trend is likely to continue.

  • The Linux Foundation launches 'Administering Linux on Azure' training course

    Linux is very much mainstream nowadays. What was once viewed as a hobby and niche project, is transforming the world. Many of the world's servers are running Linux-based operating systems. Hell, the most popular mobile operating system on the planet, Android, is Linux-based. Even closed-source champion Microsoft is embracing Linux by integrating it into Windows 10 and offering it on its Azure platform.

  • 4 Days Left to Submit Your Proposal for Open Networking Summit NA 2018

    The call for proposals deadline is quickly approaching! With more than 2000 attendees expected at this year’s event, submit before Sunday, January 14, 2018 at 11:59pm PST to share your ideas and expertise with the open networking community.

Linux and Graphics (Phoronix)

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Systemd 237 Will Have Support For WireGuard

    The next release of systemd, v237, will introduce support for WireGuard. WireGuard as a reminder is the effort to provide a fast, modern and secure VPN tunnel that eventually plans to be part of the mainline Linux kernel.

    Systemd's networkd component recently merged patches for supporting WireGuard that have been in the works since September 2016. From the systemd perspective it's implementing support for the new "wireguard" interface type and supporting key management.

  • Some Of The Other Changes Slated For Linux 4.16

    There's still a week and a half to go until the Linux 4.15.0 stable kernel release is expected and that rings in the Linux 4.16 merge window. On top of various Linux 4.16 changes already talked about, here's a look at some of the other kernel features/additions expected for this next release cycle.

  • Wayland 1.15 & Weston 4.0 Planning For Release Next Month

    Ongoing Wayland/Weston release manager Bryce Harrington of Samsung's Open-Source Group has laid out plans for the next releases of Wayland and the reference Weston compositor.

    It's been a half-year since the release of Wayland 1.14 and Weston 3.0, so Bryce is trying to build up interest in getting out new releases in the weeks ahead.

  • NVIDIA Contributes Some New Tegra/Nouveau Patches

    It's not any re-clocking code or magical improvements for Nouveau's Pascal support, but on the Tegra side a NVIDIA developer has volleyed some new open-source patches.

  • Initial Intel Ice Lake PCH Support Posted
  • The Linux Graphics Stack Gets Further Meson-ized: Now With Libdrm Support

    The work on adding optional Meson build system support to the Linux graphics stack and other key open-source projects continues...

    Going back to last September has been work for Meson-izing Mesa as an alternative build system rather than Autotools, CMake, or SCons within Mesa. It's been delivering fast results and since the initial port landed more Mesa components have become supported by the Meson build.

  • Server-Side GLVND Updated While X.Org Server 1.20 Drags On

    Adam Jackson of Red Hat has sent out the second version of the ongoing patches for providing server-side GLVND functionality for the X.Org Server.

    Most of you faithful Phoronix readers should be familiar with GLVND, the OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch Library. That's the effort led by NVIDIA and supported by others in the ecosystem for improving the "Linux OpenGL driver ABI" by allowing for multiple OpenGL drivers to happily co-exist on the same system without fighting over libGL.so. and the like. That's been going well but server-side GLVND for the X.Org Server takes things a step further.

  • A Look At Linux Hardware/Software Trends Over The Past Seven Years

    Here are some Linux hardware and software statistics going back to 2011.

Raspberry Pi Zero WH SBCs Are Now Available with Professionally Soldered Headers

Filed under
Linux

Meet Raspberry Pi Zero WH, the third Raspberry Pi Zero model, which offers the same features as Raspberry Pi Zero W and a professionally soldered header that might come in handy for those who don't know how to solder their own header on a Raspberry Pi Zero W board, and it's also perfect for those tiny projects of yours.

"Imagine a Raspberry Pi Zero W. Now add a professionally soldered header. Boom, that’s the Raspberry Pi Zero WH," says Alex Bate. "It’s your same great-tasting Pi, with a brand-new…crust? It’s perfect for everyone who doesn’t own a soldering iron or who wants the soldering legwork done for them."

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Linux Phones That Could Not Survive

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Though it hasn’t been sunny for Linux on smartphones. There are some interesting things to look forward to. The Librem 5 Linux phone has been creating a lot of buzz and is expected to hit the floors this year. One major reason for a Pure Linux phone not being successful could be that they haven’t been made available to the world. Most of the times they are sold only in certain regions and with lower end configuration.

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Top 3 Linux Distributions That ‘Just Work’

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Linux

Twenty years ago, when I first started using Linux, finding a distribution that worked, out of the box, was an impossible feat. Not only did the installation take some serious mental acuity, configuring the software and getting connected to the Internet was often a challenge users were reluctant to attempt.

Today, things are quite different. Linux now offers distributions that anyone can use, right out of the box. But, even among those distros that “just work,” some rise to the top to stand as the best in breed. These particular flavors of Linux are perfect for users hoping to migrate away from Windows or mac OS and who don’t want to spend hours getting up to speed on how the platform works, or (more importantly) making the system perform as expected.

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Raspberry Pi: Hands-On with the Pi Server tool

Filed under
Linux
Server

When the Raspberry Pi Foundation announced Raspbian (Debian) Stretch for x86 and Macs, there was a very brief mention of something called PiServer to manage multiple Pi clients on a network, with a promise to cover it in more detail later.

Well, 'later' has now arrived, in the form of a new Raspberry Pi Blog post titled The Raspberry Pi PiServer Tool. In simple terms, the PiServer package allows you to manage multiple Raspberry Pi clients from a single PC or Mac server. Here are the key points:

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Remove GUEST Session From Ubuntu Login Screen

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Linux

A guest session on Ubuntu allows having a temporary user account and access the Ubuntu machine. The desktop of a guest session looks like it does when a regular user logs in. Behind the scenes, Ubuntu controls the access privileges for a guest session.

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Linspire 8.0 and Freespire 4.0 Slated for Release in mid-December 2018

Filed under
OS
Linux

If you think the release of Linspire 7.0 and Freespire 3.0 were just a one-off, think again because we're now in possession of the release roadmap for both operating systems, and it looks like we should be able to get our hands on the next major releases at the end of the year. But, in the meanwhile, we'll be able to test a lot of the beta versions for both Freespire 4.0 and Linspire 8.0, as well as to enjoy new incremental versions of current releases.

"Today we are releasing the release schedule and roadmap for Linspire and Freespire. These dates are not set in stone and there may be some alterations due to holidays and development mishaps. While the Freespire beta's will be available publicly the Linspire beta's will be available to subscription holders and insiders," says Roberto J. Dohnert in today's announcement.

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Tiny solderable quad Cortex-A17 module has 4GB RAM and HDMI 2.0

Filed under
Android
Linux

Sudo’s solderable, 65 x 40mm “SudoProc” module features a 1.8GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A17 SoC with 4GB LPDDR3, up to 512GB eMMC, a GbE controller, HDMI 2.0, and -25 to 85°C support.

Slovenia-based startup Sudo Sistemi reached out to us with news of an upcoming SudoProc computer-on-module touted for being solderable and compact (65 x 40 x 4.3mm). Sudo has yet to get back to our request for confirmation that the module’s 1.8GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A17 SoC is a Rockchip RK3288, although we can’t imagine what else it might be.

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Linux, Linux Foundation, and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Freedreno's MSM DRM Driver Wires In DEVFREQ Re-Clocking Support

    Freedreno open-source Qualcomm Adreno driver creator Rob Clark has sent in the set of updates for the MSM DRM driver targeting the Linux 4.16 kernel.

    The MSM Direct Rendering Manager updates for DRM-Next to go into Linux 4.16 are a bit late for the DRM staging, but these changes are mostly small. Besides some bug fixes and other minor code changes, the main feature addition for MSM in Linux 4.16 is DEVFREQ support for controlling the GPU clock frequency.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces New Linux on Azure Training Course [Ed: The Linux Foundation works for Microsoft now. Corrupted by the money. Microsoft meanwhile attacks Linux with patents.]
  • Automotive Grade Linux gets support from Toyota and Amazon as it eyes autonomous driving

    Open-source software was once something that large businesses shied away from, but over the course of the last few years, it’s made inroads into virtually every enterprise company. With Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), the Linux Foundation hosts a project that aims to bring open source to the car industry. As the AGL group announced at CES in Las Vegas today, Toyota and Amazon have now signed up to support the project, as well.

    Toyota, which is using AGL in the 2018 Camry, is joining as a platinum member, while Amazon opted for the silver level. Indeed, you may have seen another Toyota and Amazon mashup today, which is probably no coincidence.

  • R600 Gallium3D Gets More Fixes, Experimental SB Tessellation Support

    If you are still running with a pre-GCN AMD graphics card, a number of R600 Gallium3D commits landed in Mesa Git over night as well as an interesting patch series on the Mesa mailing list.

    Hitting Mesa 17.4-dev Git a few hours ago were a number of R600 Gallium3D fixes. This time around the various fixes come courtesy of VMware's Roland Scheidegger, a long time Mesa developer. They are a variety of minor fixes. It's nice to see nevertheless as R600g doesn't get too much action these days.

  • xf86-video-intel Gets Coffee Lake Support

    The xf86-video-intel DDX driver now has support for the first "Coffee Lake" processors.

  • The Current CPU Driver Usage Difference Between RADV/RadeonSI & NVIDIA

    Yesterday I posted some fresh GPU/driver benchmark results for discrete AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards. These were some of the most competitive numbers yet we've seen out of the open-source RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV drivers while using the latest Linux 4.15 kernel, especially for the GTX 1060 vs. RX 580 battle. In the comments were requests to see some CPU utilization numbers, including from one of the Radeon Linux developers, so here is a look at how the CPU usage compares.

    With having some spare cycles this morning on that Core i7 8700K "Coffee Lake" desktop, I ran a CPU usage comparison with various Linux games when using the Radeon RX 580 (on Linux 4.15 + Mesa 17.4-dev + LLVM 6.0 SVN) vs. the comparable GeForce GTX 1060 (on Linux 4.15 + NVIDIA 390.12) for showing the latest CPU utilization difference for both OpenGL and Vulkan games.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Now Supports VK_EXT_discard_rectangles

    RADV co-founder Bas Nieuwenhuizen has landed support for the Vulkan VK_EXT_discard_rectangles extension within Mesa 17.4-dev.

  • RADV Gets Another Optimization For Micro-Benchmarks

    David Airlie and Bas Nieuwenhuizen's work on the RADV open-source Vulkan driver is quite relentless. David has posted yet another patch working on further optimizing the performance of this unofficial Radeon Vulkan driver living within Mesa.

  • The NVIDIA 390 Driver Is Playing Nicely With Linux 4.15 Kernel

    For those NVIDIA Linux users reliant upon the proprietary driver and wanting to upgrade to the Linux 4.15 kernel that will be officially released within the next two weeks, the 390.12 driver is playing nicely.

    Earlier NVIDIA driver releases ran into compatibility issues with the Linux 4.15 interfaces following the merge window (not due to KPTI, as some other FUD previously passed around by others). But with last week's NVIDIA 390.12 beta it has been working fine atop the Linux 4.15 Git kernel, including when Kernel Page Table Isolation is enabled for Meltdown prevention. (Retpoline support has yet to be mainlined, haven't tested the NVIDIA driver there yet to formally confirm if any breakage may happen.)

  • AMDGPU Queues More Fixes For Linux 4.16

    AMD sent in a fair number of AMDGPU updates slated for Linux 4.16 but now hitting the cut-off for major feature updates for DRM-Next code looking to make it into 4.16, AMD has submitted some fixes.

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Security: Updates, WordPress, Hardware Patches, and Open Source Security Podcast

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • WordPress 4.9.2 Security and Maintenance Release
    WordPress 4.9.2 is now available. This is a security and maintenance release for all versions since WordPress 3.7. We strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately. An XSS vulnerability was discovered in the Flash fallback files in MediaElement, a library that is included with WordPress. Because the Flash files are no longer needed for most use cases, they have been removed from WordPress.
  • Debian-Based SolydXK Linux OS Receives Patch for Meltdown Security Vulnerability
    The Debian-based SolydXK Linux operating system has been updated today with patches for the Meltdown security vulnerability, as well as various other new features and improvements. To mitigate the Meltdown security exploit that allows a locally installed program to access the memory, including the kernel memory, and steal sensitive information like passwords and encryption keys, the SolydXK 201801 ISO images are now powered by the latest kernel release with patches against this vulnerability.
  • Chakra GNU/Linux Now Patched Against Meltdown & Spectre Security Vulnerabilities
    It's time for users of the Chakra GNU/Linux operating system to patch their systems against the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities as new kernel updates landed today in the repos. Publicly disclosed earlier this month, the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities are affecting us all, but OS vendors and OEMs are trying their best to mitigate them so that no user can be the victim of attacks where their sensitive data is at risk of getting in the hands of the wrong person.
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 78 - Risk lessons from Hawaii

GNOME Devs to Users: Desktop Icons Are Moving to GNOME Shell with GNOME 3.28

There appears to be a lot of fuss lately about the removal of an option from the GNOME desktop environment that allows users to display icons on their desktops. Long story short, last month, near the Christmas holidays, GNOME developer Carlos Soriano shared his plans on removing a so-called "the desktop" feature from the Nautilus file manager starting with the upcoming GNOME 3.28 release of the desktop environment, proposing its integration into the GNOME Shell component. The feature is there to handle application icons on the user's workspace, but it shouldn't have been implemented in Nautilus in the first place, according to the developer. So for the GNOME devs to be able to add new features to the Nautilus file manager, they need to remove its ability to handle desktop icons and place the code somewhere else. Read more