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Linux

Linux Devices

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Linux
  • SPI On Embedded Linux

    Are you already comfortable working with Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) parts and looking for a challenge? We suspect many of you have cut your teeth on 8-bit through 32-bit microcontrollers but how much time have you spent playing with hardware interfaces on embedded Linux? Here a new quest, should you choose to accept it. [Matt Porter] spoke in detail about the Linux SPI Subsystem during his presentation at FOSDEM 2017. Why not grab an embedded Linux board and try your hand at connecting some extra hardware to one of the SPI buses?

  • PiMiniMint

    The idea of having a computer in an altoids tin came to me back when in early 2012, shortly after the original raspberry pi came out. With the release of the pi zero, this became a possibility. The first version of the PiMiniMint contains a screen, wifi, Bluetooth, 32gb of storage, an infrared camera, and a full size USB port. When I decided to add a battery, I realized the camera needed to be removed. The current vision of the PiMiniMint contains a battery life of around 6-8hrs, a 2in screen, 32gb of storage, Bluetooth, wifi, and a full sized USB port (in the form of an OTG cable).

  • Nextcloud ready Raspberry Pi image

    I would like to introduce NextCloudPi, a ready to use Raspbian 8 image with the latest Nextcloud 11.0.1.

  • We've started to order things!

    Once we have the kernel and OS running well enough for "almost" normal usage, I'll start sending the prototypes to the prototype orders as well as auction some more here at the boards.

  • Project Idea: PI Sw1tch

    While gaming is not high on my agenda anymore (... or rather at all), I have recently been mulling buying a new console, to act as much as a home entertainment center as a gaming system.

    Having owned several generations PlayStation and Sega products, a few new consoles caught my eye. While the most "open" solution, the Steambox sort-of fizzled out, Nintendo's latest console Switch does seem to stand out of the crowd. The balance between power and portability looks like a good fit, and given Nintendo's previous successes, it wouldn't be surprising if it became a hit.

Linux 4.9.11

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Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.11 kernel.

All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

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Also: Linux 4.4.50

Top 5 Linux distros of 2017

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Linux

Ever since it was introduced, Linux has been gaining rapid popularity among users. Linux is used for networking, software development and web hosting. However, choosing the right distro is very important given that there are dozens of them which can fulfil your needs.

A distro, or distribution, is tech-talk for a Linux operating system (OS). Each distro is differentiated by its default interface, i.e. the way it looks, the library of apps officially supported by the specific “brand” of Linux, catalog of stock applications and even repositories. In the Linux world, there are hundreds of different flavors of distro. Examples include Debian, Ubuntu and Red Hat (among many others).

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Xfce Resurgence

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Releases, releases, releases!

    So it’s not that I’ve been quiet and lazy – I was actually busy preparing some releases and hacking on stuff. So here’s an update on what’s been going on and what’s to come.

  • Alternative Global Menu For MATE And Xfce: Vala Panel AppMenu [PPA]

    A while back I wrote about TopMenu, a panel plugin that provides global menu (AppMenu) support for MATE, then also included support for Xfce and LXDE.

    The problem with TopMenu is that it only partially supports GTK3, it doesn't support LibreOffice, and with Ubuntu 16.04, it doesn't support Qt (4 or 5) applications.

    Here's where Vala Panel AppMenu comes in.

  • Parole Media Player 0.9.0 Released

    Development for the Xfce media player is back on! Well over a year since the last release, Parole 0.9.0 brings a fresh set of features and fixes.

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed.

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Android and Tizen Leftovers

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Android
Linux
  • Video: The Future of Samsung Tizen TV, a new user interface for your changing moods

    It’s our vision that helps us shape what tomorrow’s technology will look like. Samsung Design America are no strangers to the idea of vision and want to conceptualise the future of television or in our case Tizen television.

    Samsung wanted to realise how their products could adapt to this new world in which you are able to play any of the world’s media content, which is available anytime, anywhere on any given device.

  • Smartphone App: Indian Rail IRCTC PNR Status available in Tizen Store
  • NuAns is back with Neo Reloaded, but it's Android-powered

    Back in 2015, Japanese company NuAns showed off its Windows 10-powered Neo smartphone for the first time. It's selling point was the TWOTONE interchangeable covers for its back. The phone debuted at CES 2016, post which the company announced its plans for the device's global launch through a Kickstarter campaign.

  • New LG G6 photos surface
  • OnePlus 3 and 3T get Nougat-based Hydrogen OS 3.0 update
  • What devices are Android Authority readers using?
  • The Facts-Based Survey of Mobile Money Globally Focusing on the Reality and Numbers - Ignores totally the utterly trivial noise of Apple Pay, Bitcoins and Paypal

    World has 2.5 Billion active users of mobile payments already in 2016. That is more than the total active user base of Facebook. The value of mobile payment transactions last year was worth $600 Billion dollars. Easily ten times bigger than the total combined value of all app stores, iOS, Google Play and others, put together. Just in tickets sold onto mobile alone, the world saw 11.5 Billion mobile tickets delivered last year. The bulk of those were on busses, trains and airplanes, not movies, rock concerts and lottery tickets. Mobile coupons are worth $30 Billion dollars all by that category alone. All this is discussed in today's blog article. This article sets in proper relationship the various technologies that you probably have heard of about mobile payments such as mobile internet based services like Paypal, NFC based payments like Apple Pay, Starbucks style mobile wallets, M-Pesa style SMS payments, Bitcoins, but also QR codes, USSD, MMS and WAP Billing. This article offers the most thorough treatment of mobile payments in the public domain currently, and it focuses on where the money is. 54% of all mobile payments processed last year went through..... SMS. There are tons of case examples and statistics from all around the world: Australia, China, Finland, India, Japan, Kenya, Malaysia, Norway, Philippines, South Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, UK and USA. There are major corporations and brands discussed who do remarkable things with mobile payments today like Air Asia, Castrol, Coca Cola, Finnair, Lifebuoy, Nordstrom, Rihanna and Tally Weijl.

5 Best Linux Password Managers

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Linux

How do you keep track of ton of user accounts and passwords in this online age. I hope you do not use one password for all your online accounts as that is not safe. You need to come up with the unique and secure passwords for all your online services and accounts. So how do you manage or keep track of these passwords. In your memory? Come on! I recommend you use a password manager.

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New Releases: Manjaro XFCE, Vine Linux, IPFire

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Manjaro XFCE 17.0-rc1 released

    Manjaro Fringilla was a great release! Now we are proud to announce our first release candidate of our next release, we call “Gellivara”. It took us more than two month to prepare this new release series for 2017.

  • Vine Linux 6.5 beta8 (final)
  • IPFire 2.19 Core Update 109 Hits Stable with Python 3 Support and OpenSSL 1.0.2k

    After being in development for the past two weeks, IPFire 2.19 Core Update 109 has today hit the stable channel and it's a recommended upgrade for all those who use the IPFire 2.19 series of the open-source, Linux-based firewall distro.

    As noted in our previous report, the most important feature of IPFire 2.19 Core Update 109 is the inclusion of the unbound 1.6.0 recursive and caching DNS resolver in the distro's built-in DNS proxy to address some important bugs, re-activate QNAME minimisation and hardening below NX domains, and implement the ability for the firewall to check if a router loses longer DNS responses.

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Ten Features You Will Not Find In The Mainline Linux 4.10 Kernel

    With last weekend mentioning ten exciting features of Linux 4.10, the tables have turned and now we are looking at ten features not found in the mainline our complete Linux 4.10 feature overview for all of the great stuff shipping in this kernel that should be out on Sunday. You may consider this article now as a bit of satire with some of these features weren't expected to appear in Linux 4.10 in the first place, but I am just mentioning several things that aren't in Linux 4.10 but some users would have found nice if they in fact happened.

  • SystemTap 3.1 has been released

    The SystemTap team has announced the 3.1 release of the tool that allows extracting performance and debugging information at runtime from the kernel as well as various user-space programs. New features include support for adding probes to Python 2 and 3 functions, Java probes now convert all parameters to strings before passing them to probes, a new @variance() statistical operator has been added, new sample scripts have been added, and more.

  • The X.Org Foundation Is Preparing For Their 2017 Elections

    This year's X.Org Foundation elections are warming up and will be getting underway shortly.

Linus The Man Behind Linux

Filed under
Linux

Well, we all have heard somewhere (if not using it already) about Linux an Operating System that hardly gets a virus, that runs applications created to run only on Linux and can’t run Windows and MacOS applications (at least not out of the box), and it's free, as in free beer or as in speech. But how was Linux created? Why is it free? Who created it?

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Android Leftovers

Google's Upspin Debuts

  • Another option for file sharing
    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.
  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files
    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.
  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub
    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share. Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.
  • Google devs try to create new global namespace
    Wouldn't it be nice if there was a universal and consistent way to give names to files stored on the Internet, so they were easy to find? A universal resource locator, if you like? The problem is that URLs have been clunkified, so Upspin, an experimental project from some Google engineers, offers an easier model: identifying files to users and paths, and letting the creator set access privileges.

RPi-friendly home automation kit adds voice recognition support

Following its successful Kickstarter campaign for a standalone Matrix home automation and surveillance hub, and subsequent release of an FPGA-driven Matrix Creator daughter board for use with the Raspberry Pi, Matrix Labs today launched a “Matrix Voice” board on Indiegogo. The baseline board, currently available at early-bird pricing of $45, has an array of 7 microphones surrounding a ring of 18 software-controlled RGBW LEDs. A slightly pricier model includes an MCU-controlled WiFi/Bluetooth ESP32 wireless module. Read more

The Year Of Linux On Everything But The Desktop

The War on Linux goes back to Bill Gates, then CEO of Microsoft, in an “open letter to hobbyists” published in a newsletter in 1976. Even though Linux wouldn’t be born until 1991, Gates’ burgeoning software company – itself years away from releasing its first operating system – already felt the threat of open source software. We know Gates today as a kindly billionaire who’s joining us in the fight against everything from disease to income inequality, but there was a time when Gates was the bad guy of the computing world. Microsoft released its Windows operating system in 1985. At the time, its main competition was Apple and Unix-like systems. BSD was the dominant open source Unix clone then – it marks its 40th birthday this year, in fact – and Microsoft fired barrages of legal challenges to BSD just like it eventually would against Linux. Meanwhile Apple sued Microsoft over its interface, in the infamous “Look and Feel” lawsuit, and Microsoft’s reign would forever be challenged. Eventually Microsoft would be tried in both the US and the UK for antitrust, which is a government regulation against corporate monopolies. Even though it lost both suits, Microsoft simply paid the fine out of its bottomless pockets and kept right at it. Read more