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Desktop GNU/Linux and Microsoft Intervention

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Linux Mint 18.3 beta due for release this week

    The final release of the Linux Mint 18 series, Linux Mint 18.3, is due to see its beta release sometime this week. The final release will follow in tow a week or so after the beta. Ever since July, we’ve been tracking the changes that are due for Mint 18.3 "Sylvia", however, the team behind the distribution have announced several last minute changes so it’s worth going over those now.

  • Munich has putsch against Linux [Ed: does not quote any of the other side's arguments; Microsoft played dirty to cause this. It has been well documented.]

    Once the open sauce poster-boy Munich city council's administrative and personnel committee has decided to purge Linux from its desk-top and invite Windows 10 to return by 2020.

    [...]

    She said the cost of the migration will not be made public until November 23, but today about 40 percent of 30,000 users already have Windows machines.

  • My Adventure Migrating Back To Windows

    I have had linux as my primary OS for about a decade now, and primarily use Ubuntu. But with the latest release I have decided to migrate back to an OS I generally dislike, Windows 10.

  • Samsung ditches Windows, shows Linux running on Galaxy Note 8 over DeX

    Samsung is now planning to deliver a full-fledged operating system over Samsung DeX with Linux, instead of Windows. While initially, Samsung’s DeX was supposed to run Windows 10 desktop in a virtual environment, the company is now leaning on Linux to offer a desktop experience.

  • Samsung demos Linux running on a Galaxy Note8 smartphone

    It has been known for some time that Samsung has been experimenting with the idea of running Linux distributions through its DeX platform on its Galaxy smartphones. The idea, being quite simple, is basically there to allow the user to use their device for multiple purposes, one of these being a replacement for the traditional desktop.

  • Samsung Demonstrates Ubuntu 16 Running Natively On DeX

    Samsung Electronics is entertaining the idea of bringing the full-fledged Linux operating system to the Samsung DeX platform, and these efforts were highlighted in a recent concept demo video published on YouTube by Samsung Newsroom, showcasing Samsung DeX running the Ubuntu 16 Linux distribution. Assuming that this feature will be implemented, it may place the DeX docking station on the radars of more potential customers as the product could grow in popularity especially amongst Linux users.

Take Linux and Run With It

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

"How do you run an operating system?" may seem like a simple question, since most of us are accustomed to turning on our computers and seeing our system spin up. However, this common model is only one way of running an operating system. As one of Linux's greatest strengths is versatility, Linux offers the most methods and environments for running it.

To unleash the full power of Linux, and maybe even find a use for it you hadn't thought of, consider some less conventional ways of running it -- specifically, ones that don't even require installation on a computer's hard drive.

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Split Screen is Coming to Google's Pixelbook Chromebook, Here's a Sneak Peek

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Good news for PixelBook owners today as Chromium evangelist at Google François Beaufort informs the community via his Google+ page that split screen support is coming to the Chromebook Pixel.

In an attempt to improve the multitasking capabilities of Chromebooks, Google implemented split screen support in the latest Chrome OS Dev channel via a new flag called "Split view in Tablet mode," which can be enabled only on the Google Pixelbook.

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Btrfs Zstd Compression Benchmarks On Linux 4.14

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Of the many new features in Linux 4.14, one of the prominent additions is initial support for Zstd compression that is initially wired in for transparent file-system compression with SquashFS and Btrfs. Here are some benchmarks of Zstd Btrfs compression compared to the existing LZO and Zlib compression mount options.

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Collabora's Role in Linux Development

Filed under
Development
Linux
  • Nine Collabora Developers Have Contributed 46 Patches to the Linux 4.14 Kernel

    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today on the contributions made by the Collabora developers to the recently released Linux 4.14 kernel series.

    Linux kernel 4.14 is the newest long-term supported (LTS) kernel series, bringing exciting new features like support for AMD Secure Memory Encryption, bigger memory limits, Heterogeneous Memory Management to support upcoming GPUs, faster TBL flushing, asynchronous non-blocking buffered reads, and much more.

  • Collabora & Linux Kernel 4.14

    Linus Torvalds has released Linux 4.14, so it's time to take a look at the Collaborans' contributions to this release. On total, we had 9 developers who authored 46 patches all around the kernel. In addition, 7 Collaborans contributed their time to review and test 40 patches. Finally, over a hundred patches found their way to Linus tree via our team, who provided over 108 non-author sign-offs during this development cycle.

    Taking a deeper look at the contributions, Sebastian Reichel continued on his role as the Power Supply maintainer. Aside from several improvements for the da9052 PMIC driver, he added a driver for PWM controllable vibrators, which will be used by the Motorola Droid 4. Romain Perier, who recently left Collabora, touched several users of the PCI DMA Pool wrappers, which is currently deprecated, and updated them to use the DMA Pool API directly, making it one step closer to complete his proposal to remove the pci_poll_*() macros.

Samsung Demo of GNU/Linux on Phones

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets
  • Watch: Ubuntu Linux Running on Galaxy S8 with Samsung DeX - Concept Demo

    Samsung recently published a new video on its YouTube channel demoing the recently launched "Linux on Galaxy" concept it introduced last month for Galaxy S8, S8+, and Note8 smartphones.

    Promising to bring the full Linux PC experience to your mobile device, the "Linux on Galaxy" concept relies on the Samsung DeX dock station, which transforms a Samsung Galaxy S8, S8+, or Note8 smartphone into a full-fledged desktop or workstation if you attach a monitor, keyboard, and mouse.

    Basically, Samsung DeX offers convergence for your Galaxy smartphone, something that Canonical wanted to create with its Ubuntu Linux operating system and the Unity 8 user interface that it's no longer under development. And now, Samsung wants to give you the full Linux PC experience on your smartphone.

  • Samsung Demos Ubuntu Running on a Galaxy Smartphone

    Samsung has shared a video of its 'Linux on Galaxy' app that lets developers run full desktop Linux distributions on select Galaxy smartphones.

  • Samsung cuts Windows from the loop, shows Ubuntu Linux running on the Samsung Galaxy Note 8

    Now Samsung has uploaded a concept video of what they want Linux on Galaxy to be like when it matures, allowing the sophisticated development of Android apps on an Android phone itself (and cutting Windows and MacOS completely out of the loop.)

Linux Kernel 4.14 Features Breakdown

Filed under
Linux
  • LTS Linux Kernel 4.14: No Regressions

    Linus Torvalds released version 4.14 of the Linux kernel on Sunday, Nov. 12 -- which was a week later than expected. The delay was due to some reverts that would have made the projected Nov. 5 release too early.

    One of the unsettling reverts was regarding an AppArmor patch that was causing a regression, a big no-no according to Torvalds, who stated the first rule of Linux kernel development: “we don't cause regressions.” After some back and forth, Linus reverted the offending commit himself and the problem was temporarily solved.

    And now the new kernel is here: Linux 4.14 is the 2017 Long-Term Stable (LTS) release of the kernel and will be supported for about two years. Greg Kroah-Hartman made the announcement in his blog and added that he would be supporting 4.14 with stable kernel patch backports "unless it is a horrid release," which, despite the delaying issues, doesn't seem to be the case.

  • The new long-term Linux kernel, Linux 4.14, has arrived

    Linus Torvalds quietly released the latest Linux 4.14 kernel on Nov. 12. It won't be a quiet release, though. The Linux developers had previously announced that 4.14 would be Linux's next long-term support (LTS) version of the Linux kernel. That's important because Linux LTS version now has a six-year life span.

    That changes everything for Linux device developers. As Google senior staff engineer Iliyan Malchev recently said, "All Android devices [...] are based of the LTS kernel. The problem with LTS is it's only two years. And so, by the time the first devices on a SoC [System on a Chip] hit the market, you have maybe a year, if you're lucky, of LTS support. And, if you're not, it's over." Now, Internet of Things (IoT), smartphone, and embedded Linux device developers can build gear knowing that it's operating system will be supported until 2023.

  • Linux Kernel 4.14 Announced, Adds Support for AMD Secure Memory Encryption and More

    Linux, the best-known and most-used open source operating system, got a major upgrade on Sunday. Linus Torvalds announced the latest version of the Linux kernel, version 4.14, and the many new features and tweaks packed inside it.

    One involves reverting code that improved the accuracy of the displayed CPU frequency on modern, dynamically-clocked processors in /proc/cpuinfo. It worked as intended in most cases, but there were lingering issues with overhead on machines with tens or hundreds of CPU cores. There’s a plan to bring the feature back, but not anytime soon.

    Another change is AMD Secure Memory Encryption, an optional feature that can be used to protect the contents of DRAM from physical attacks on the system, and a new “unwinder” which prints the list of functions (i.e.. stack trace, callgraph, call stack) that have been executed before reaching a determinate point of the code. Linux already had an unwinder, but it wasn’t as efficient as ORC unwinder, which doesn’t need to insert code anywhere and so doesn’t affect text size or runtime performance.

Linux Lite Users Are Among the First to Get Linux 4.14, Here's How to Install It

Filed under
Linux

As you know, Linus Torvalds released the Linux 4.14 kernel series on Sunday, November 12, 2017, and while most GNU/Linux distro maintainers are waiting for it to be marked as stable on kernel.org, which will happen when the first point release is out, namely Linux kernel 4.14.1, Jerry Bezencon prepared the new kernel for his users.

Linux kernel 4.14 is the new long-term supported (LTS) kernel series and introduces features like larger memory limits, zstd compression for the Btrfs and SquashFS file systems, Heterogeneous Memory Management for future GPUs, support for AMD Secure Memory Encryption, better cpufreq behavior, and much more.

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GNU Linux-Libre 4.14 Kernel Officially Released for Those Seeking 100% Freedom

Filed under
Linux

GNU Linux-libre 4.14 kernel is now available for download borrowing all the features incorporated in the recently released Linux 4.14 kernel, but without incorporating any proprietary drivers. Besides the usual deblobbing, this release also comes without the firmware subtree, which was removed upstream.

"The biggest change in this release is that the firmware subtree was removed upstream (thus the codename -ENOFIRMWARE), removing from the Linux kernel distribution a few pieces of Free firmware, and a number of non-Free ones. Alas, there are still a few pieces of non Free firmware remaining in Linux 4.14," said Alexandre Oliva.

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Firefox Quantum Now Rolling Out to All Ubuntu Linux Users, Update Now

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GNU/Linux Laptops for Developers

  • 5 New & Powerful Dell Linux Machines You Can Buy Right Now
    The land of powerful PCs and workstations isn’t barren anymore when we talk about Linux-powered machines; even all of the world’s top 500 supercomputers now run Linux. Dell has joined hands with Canonical Inc. to give Linux-powered machines a push in the market. They have launched five new Canonical-certified workstations running Ubuntu Linux out-of-the-box as a part of the Dell Precision series. An advantage of buying these canonical-certified machines is that the users won’t have to worry about incompatibility with Linux.
  • How to set up a Pixelbook for programming
    The beauty of Chrome OS is that most of the "state" of your system is in the cloud, attached to your Google Account, but if you have any local documents those will be gone. This is because Developer Mode basically destroys the physically secure design of Chrome OS. Now you're in Linux land, and local security is your job, not Google's. Every time you boot up now, you'll have the option to press Space bar and wipe the system again and return to the safety of vanilla Chrome OS. Press Ctrl-D to continue into the unknown.