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Linus Torvalds at Open Source Leadership Summit

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Linux
  • Video: Linus Torvalds on How to Build a Successful Open Source Project

    Linux creator Linus Torvalds took the stage at Open Source Leadership Summit this week to share some of his secrets to success in building one of the world’s largest and most successful open source projects.

    After 25 years of development, the Linux kernel last year reached more than 22 million lines of code with more than 5,000 developers from about 500 companies contributing, according to the 2016 Linux Kernel Development Report.

  • Tech industry innovation is bullshit

    Open sauce's Mr Sweary Linus Torvalds has waded into tech companies who keep banging on about innovation.

    Swearing at the Open Source Leadership Summit, Torvalds said he really hates the technology industry's celebration of innovation. He thinks it is smug, self-congratulatory, and self-serving.

Linux Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Linux Lite Among The Best Lightweight Linux Distributions

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Linux

Today, we will look at Linux lite 3.2. This is neither a distro aiming to be a lightweight distro nor a distro trying to unleash the power of Linux with all apps preloaded. Instead, It tries to strike that perfect balance between them. Now, almost all of the distros aim to do that then, what is so special about this distro which makes it unique. Well, let me introduce to the distro first and I think why it achieved so much more than other distros becomes clear after that.

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Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • What's Still Left TODO With The Intel ANV Vulkan Driver

    With yesterday having marked one year since the release of Vulkan as well as one year since the ANV Vulkan driver code was open-sourced, here's a look at some of what's still left to be tackled by this open-source Vulkan Linux driver for HD/Iris Graphics.

  • Nouveau Changes Prepped For Linux 4.11 Kernel

    Ben Skeggs has queued up the planned open-source NVIDIA (Nouveau) driver changes for the imminent Linux 4.11 cycle.

    He now has a linux-4.11 Git branch with the Nouveau DRM driver changes expected for this next kernel cycle.

  • A Lot Of The OpenGL Shader Cache Code Has Landed In Mesa

    Timothy Arceri, who is now working for Valve (on the open-source AMD driver stack after leaving Collabora), has landed significant portions of his work built upon others for providing an on-disk shader cache within Mesa.

CruxEX 3.3 (CRUX 3.3)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Enlightenment 0.21.6 Desktop Environment Adds New Wayland Improvements, Bugfixes

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GNU
Linux

It's been two months since its last update and the Enlightenment 0.21 desktop environment and window manager for Linux-based operating systems has received today a new point release, the sixth in the stable series.

Enlightenment 0.21.6 is a bugfix and stability release that attempts to address various of the issues discovered by the development team behind the open-source software or reported by users since the last update. A total of 28 changes were included in the new version, some of them bringing improvements for the Wayland display server.

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Leftovers: GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
  • New And Best Features Of Linux Kernel 4.10

    Back in December, 2016, Linux boss Linus Torvalds rolled out Linux kernel 4.9. Thanks to tons of code due to Project Ara’s ‘greybus’ and AMD GPU register definition files, it was the biggest ever kernel release in terms of commits. The release also opened the Linux kernel 4.10 merge window. Kernel 4.10 is expected to be released this weekend–most probably on February 19.

  • Renesas joins industrial Linux organisation

    Starting with the RZ/G series of microcontrollers (1.5GHz ARM, 3D graphics, HD video), it plans to develop an embedded platform for industrial applications incorporating the project’s industrial-grade Linux operating system (OS).

  • Open source industrial software gets momentum with Civil Infrastructure Platform
  • Best Linux distros for small businesses in 2017

    Running a small business is no easy task. The last thing you need is extra complexity in your IT infrastructure – so why turn to Linux? Well, it could (if you're lucky) actually turn out to be a less complex choice for many tasks, depending on the distribution you select. And, critically, Linux is free; at least if you don't figure in support costs. That's an overhead ticked off the list.

    So what's the best choice for your small business? We've approached this selection with a few criteria in mind. Stability is first and foremost, because if you're putting a distro to work, uptime is critical, and solid support provision comes a close second.

  • Kernels Becoming Tumbleweed Norm, Grub 2 Gets Release Candidate

    Two Linux Kernels per week in openSUSE Tumbleweed is becoming the norm as the rolling release is providing daily snapshots of new software that are closely aligned with upstream development.

    Kernel 4.9.8 and 4.9.9 were released in the 20170208 and 20170212 snapshots respectively and the later brought a fix for a Btrfs system call.

Networking and Servers

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GNU
Linux
Server
  • Your OpenStack Cloud Is Only As Good As The Linux You Install It On

    OpenStack services and drivers require a robust and integrated Linux operating system for top-performing functionality.

    OpenStack is not (just) an operating system; it’s cloud infrastructure.

    Open source developers and technologists from around the world collaborate on OpenStack to create infrastructure and tools for building and managing public and private clouds. According to the overview provided by the OpenStack Foundation, OpenStack is a “cloud operating system” that is designed to control and manage large pools of compute, storage, and networking resources.

    In more practical terms, OpenStack is a framework of at least 10 independent core services that all function together as the foundation for cloud infrastructure. At its very basic level, OpenStack is a set of services provided via a group of Python-written scripts that work in conjunction with another. Like any script, service, or plugin, they require an operating system (OS) to run, function, and perform. In OpenStack’s case, the OS of choice is Linux.

  • The Basics: Explaining Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and Docker Swarm

    Containers, a lightweight way to virtualize applications, are an important element of any DevOps plan. But how are you going to manage all of those containers? Container orchestration programs—Kubernetes, Mesosphere Marathon, and Docker Swarm—make it possible to manage containers without tearing your hair out.

    Before jumping into those, let's review the basics. Containers, according to 451 Research, are the fastest growing cloud-enabling technology. The reason for their appeal is that they use far fewer system resources than do virtual machines (VMs). After all, a VM runs not merely an operating system, but also a virtual copy of all the hardware that the OS needs to run. In contrast, containers demand just enough operating system and system resources for an application instance to run.

  • What's the difference between NFV automation and NFV orchestration?

    NFV automation is the ability to transfer manual network configuration to technology; NFV orchestration creates the deployment and automation blueprint.

  • AT&T, Intel, Google, Microsoft, Visa, and More to Speak at Open Networking Summit 2017

    The Linux Foundation has announced keynote speakers and session highlights for Open Networking Summit, to be held April 3-6, 2017 in Santa Clara, CA.

    ONS promises to be the largest, most comprehensive and most innovative networking and orchestration event of the year. The event brings enterprises, carriers, and cloud service providers together with the networking ecosystem to share learnings, highlight innovation and discuss the future of open source networking.

  • Developing open source software defined standards

    The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) is announcing its new Open Innovation Pipeline made possible through the aligned operations of ONF and Open Networking Lab (ON.Lab) as these two organizations finalize their pending merger.

    ON.Lab, with CORD and ONOS, successfully brought together operators, vendors and integrators to build solutions for carrier networks by leveraging SDN, NFV and Cloud technologies through an open source approach to solution creation. Operators have embraced the approach, and the industry is in the midst of a resulting transformation revolutionizing how solutions will be built for 5G mobile, ultra broadband and other next-generation networks.

Desktop: Munich’s Fake News On GNU/Linux, More Misleading Headlines, and "You've come a long way baby!"

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GNU
Linux
  • Munich’s Fake News On GNU/Linux

    Truth doesn’t seem to matter much in politics these days. Just repeat a lie. If enough believe it, you get what you want… Despite proof that GNU/Linux works for Munich, the mayor and friends are going to migrate back to Wintel at all costs.

  • Munich's vote to return to Windows annoys Linux and LibreOffice community [Ed: This headline is misleading and needs correcting]

    THE GERMAN CITY of Munich has voted to investigate the viability of creating a Windows 10 client, thus ending its multi-million euro, nine-year experiment in running the municipality on Linux.

    A final decision will be taken later, but the announcement marks the first step on the road back to Microsoft, just three years after completing the transition.

  • Linux desktops: You've come a long way baby!

    Anyone who has used Linux for the last 15 years or so knows that things have gotten better and better when it comes to desktop environments. There are plenty to choose from and, as the years have gone by, Linux desktops have made big advances in terms of features and quality.

    One redditor recently noted how much better Linux desktops are today in a thread on the Linux subreddit.

Tizen News

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Linux
  • Google under Investigation for obstructing Samsung’s development of Tizen

    Google, the maker of the Android Operating System (OS), has had an anti-competitive Investigation launched against it by The South Korean Fair Trade Commission (FTC), to see whether it has obstructed Samsung’s development of the Tizen platform to replace the Android OS on its mobiles.

  • Smartphone Game: Ninja Assassin’s comes to the Tizen Store for Samsung Z1, Z2, and Z3
  • GameAnalytics releases SDK for use with Tizen apps

    Of late we have been reporting on SDKs being released by some of the popular software service providers for the Tizen OS. Today’s new addition to this list comes from GameAnalytics. GameAnalytics until now has been available for iOS, Android, Windows, Unity, Unreal, etc and provides game developers with an easy to use service for getting valuable analytical data of their players. The most important part of the service is that it is completely free of cost. Tizen game developers can now make use of GameAnalytics’ SDK for Tizen and implement it into their games.

  • Smartphone App: HDR Camera take HD photos on your Tizen Devices

    Lots of new apps were added to the Tizen Store this month like games, funny apps, music and video apps, photo editing, camera apps, entertainment apps etc. Lately, we have also had many good camera apps added like InstaTags, Monograph. Sweet camera, angleCam etc.

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More in Tux Machines

Latvian Ventspils controls costs with open source

The administration of Ventspils, Latvia’s sixth largest city, is an avid user of free and open source software. The main benefits: cost and resource optimisation. Read more

Ubuntu Touch finds a home on a conflict-free, fair-trade, user-maintainable handset

Handset maker Fairphone is teaming up with the community project UBports, which seeks to get Ubuntu Touch on mobile devices. They will be showing off Ubuntu Touch running on the Fairphone 2 during Mobile World Congress, which starts February 27 in Barcelona. While Ubuntu is probably not the first name that comes to mind when you think of mobile devices, the phone in question offers some compelling features. “UBports Foundation will be showcasing its work at the Canonical booth, the company behind Ubuntu. Canonical is planning to tell about the latest developments around the convergence of its devices and UBports Foundation will share its mission ‘Ubuntu On Every Device’ with the visitors,” UBports said in a February 8 press release. Currently, UBports’ website lists three devices as “fully working as daily drivers:” The OnePlus One, Nexus 5, and the Fairphone 2, with the latter showing all parts as functioning with Ubuntu Touch, save the GPS radio. (Interestingly, the UBports project website for the Fairphone 2 still lists the GSM radio [in addition to the GPS] as a work in progress. However there is a video of two people talking with the handset, so it’s likely the Fairphone 2 project website is out of date.) The website also has instructions for flashing Ubuntu to the Fairphone 2. Read more

BSD Leftovers

  • LLVM/Clang 4.0 Is Running Late Due To Seven Blocker Bugs
    LLVM 4.0 was supposed to have been released by now, but it's running late due to open blocker bugs. Hans Wennborg commented on the mailing list that while the release should have happened on 21 February, serving as release manager, he hasn't tagged the release yet due to open blocker bugs.
  • FreeBSD-Based pfSense 2.3.3 Open-Source Firewall Released with over 100 Changes
    Rubicon Communications' Jim Pingle announced the availability of a new point release to the pfSense 2.3 stable series, which adds over 100 improvements and a bunch of new features. Updated to FreeBSD 10.3-RELEASE-p16, the pfSense 2.3.3 maintenance release is here more than seven months after the 2.3.2 update and introduces several new packages, including TFTP Server, LCDproc, cellular, and tinc, a lot of improvements for the OpenVPN and IPsec implementations, as well as numerous stability and security fixes from FreeBSD. Dozens of bug fixes are included in pfSense 2.3.3 for WebGUI, graphs and monitoring, gateways and routing, notifications, Dynamic DNS, captive portal, NTP and GPS, DNS, resolver and forwarder, DHCP and DHCPv6 servers, router advertisements, HA and CARP, traffic shaping, firewall, rules, NAT, aliases, states, users, authentication, and privileges.
  • “Hi, I’m jkh and I’m a d**k”
    Yesterday, I was privy to a private email message discussing a topic I care deeply about. I contacted the author and said “You really need to make this public and give this a wider audience.” His response boiled down to “if I wanted it to get a wider audience, I was welcome to do so myself.” So here’s my first ever guest post, from Jordan K Hubbard, one of the founders of the FreeBSD Project. While this discussion focuses on FreeBSD, it’s applicable to any large open source project.

Linux Graphics