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Ubuntu 18.04 Vs. Fedora 28

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Linux

Hello folks. Today I'll highlight some of the features and differences between the two popular Linux distros; Ubuntu 18.04 and Fedora 28. Each has their own package management; Ubuntu uses DEB while Fedora uses RPM, but both of them features the same Desktop Environment (GNOME) and aims to provide quality desktop experience for the Linux users.

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Kernel: Linux 4.18, Linux 4.19, Linux Plumbers Conference and Mesa 18.1.6 Release Notice

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Linux
  • Patches Revised For AMD Zen Based Hygon Dhyana Server CPUs

    Patches have been revised for the Linux kernel to support the initial Hygon Dhyana server CPUs that are the licensed AMD Family 17h "Zen" technology, basically the EPYC server CPUs for the Chinese market.

    Back in June the initial Hygon Dhyana Linux patches were posted and today they were revised for the third time. V3 of the Hygon Dhyana patches are re-based against the latest Linux 4.18 development code and rework some of the vendor checking codes for improved consistency.

  • Qualcomm Adreno 600 Series Support Proposed For Linux 4.19 Kernel

    While a bit late, Freedreno lead developer Rob Clark is hoping to see the Qualcomm Adreno 600 series bring-up happen for the Linux 4.19 kernel cycle.

    The MSM Direct Rendering Manager has long been prepping for Adreno 600 series support as the latest-generation Qualcomm graphics found on their Snapdragon SoCs. The initial code for A6xx was posted earlier this year including work by Qualcomm / Code Aurora on that hardware bring-up. With Linux 4.19 queued in DRM-Next is already the "DPU1" display code needed for newer SoCs and Rob Clark is hoping to get the working A6xx support in place for this cycle.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Early Registration Ending Soon!

    The early registration deadline is August 18, 2018, after which the regular-registration period will begin. So to save $150, register for the Linux Plumbers Conference before August 18th!

  • Mesa 18.1.6 Release Notice

    Due to a busy week and a slip of my mind I didn't get out the announcement for 18.1.6 on Wednesday. Therefore, I'm planning to make the release Monday August 13th, at or around 10AM PDT.

  • Mesa 18.1.6 On The Way With Over Three Dozen Fixes

    While Mesa 18.2 is baking for release later this month, Mesa 18.1 remains the currently supported stable series. Final release preparations are underway for Mesa 18.1.6 as the latest bi-weekly point release.

    Mesa 18.1.6 is expected to be released this coming Monday, 13 August, and so far has staged more than three dozen fixes as confirmed via Friday's release notice.

Proprietary Software on GNU/Linux: Dropbox and VMware Player 14

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GNU
Linux
Software
  • Dropbox makes the cloud rain poop on Linux users

    Cloud storage rules -- especially when coupled with a local backup plan. Quite frankly, it is one of the best computing innovations of all time. How cool is it that you can easily backup important files to an offsite location? Let's be honest -- before the cloud, many computer and smartphone users didn't bother backing up at all. While many still do not, the cloud has definitely improved the situation through convenience and affordability.

  • VMware Player 14 review - Alternate reality

    VMware Workstation Player is a very decent program, especially for new users. It comes with a reasonable set of options, it tries to guess what you're doing and help, and for lightweight use, it makes perfect sense. But if you are an advanced user, you will definitely need and want more, and this is where the full pro version comes into play. Or alternatively, go for other options. Overall, it remains similar to version 4, which I tested several years ago.

    My biggest gripe is not having hardware acceleration, which significantly improves the performance of virtual machines. The network and storage side of things are less critical for everyday use. Multi-VM is also important if you need to create more complicated setups or labs. That said, the program is simple and easy, and has a very gentle curve for people just freshly starting in the virtualization world. Worth testing, but always remember, 'tis but a teaser for the heavyweight just hiding behind the corner. Indeed, for me, the big take from this endeavor is that I need to test the Workstation as well. We shall see.

Canonical Releases New Linux Kernel Live Patch for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS & 16.04 LTS

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Linux
Ubuntu

Available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), the new kernel live patch fixes a total of five security vulnerabilities, including the recently disclosed critical TCP flaw (CVE-2018-5390) discovered by Juha-Matti Tilli, which could allow a remote attacker to cause a denial of service.

The rebootless kernel security patch also addresses a vulnerability (CVE-2018-13405) in the inode_init_owner function in fs/inode.c in the Linux kernel through 4.17.4 that could allow a local user to escalate his/her privileges by creating a file with an unintended group ownership and then make the file executable and SGID (Set Group ID).

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Linux Foundation and DRM

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Linux
  • Academy and Linux Launch Software Foundation [iophk: "FUD + DRM"]

    The ASWF is the result of a two-year investigation by the Academy’s Science and Technology Council into the use of Open Source Software (OSS) across the motion picture industry. The survey found that more than 80% of the industry uses open source software, particularly for animation and visual effects. However, this widespread use of OSS has also created challenges including siloed development, managing multiple versions of OSS libraries (“versionitis”) and varying governance and licensing models that need to be addressed in order to ensure a healthy open source ecosystem.

  • Hollywood taps the Linux Foundation to create a home for its open-source projects

    Some 13 companies are listed as founding members alongside the Academy, including The Walt Disney Co., video game giant Epic Games Inc. and DreamWorks Animation LLC. A sizable portion of the foundation’s remaining backers hail from the tech industry. Among them are Intel Corp., Cisco Systems Inc. and Google LLC’s cloud division.

Budgie Desktop, KDE and GNOME

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GNU
KDE
Linux
GNOME
  • Summertime Solus | The Roundup #7

    For those that missed our announcements of last week’s Hackfest, you can watch it via the video embedded below. Most of this roundup will cover the work that has been done since the last roundup (in the specific sections in this blog) as well as the Hackfest, so if you don’t want to sit through the 10 hours of content, feel free to just keep reading.

  • Solus Linux & Its Budgie Desktop Seeing Summer 2018 Improvements

    The Solus Project has shared some of the work they've been engaged in this summer with their Linux distribution as well as their GTK3-based Budgie Desktop Environment.

  • Community Data Analytics Are Going to Akademy

    If you are interested in community data analytics, you will have several opportunities to discuss them during Akademy.

    Firstly, there will be my talk titled Bringing Community Data Analysis Back to KDE (why the hell did I use "Analysis" there... I only used "Analytics" everywhere so far, odd). It will happen on Saturday at 15:30 in room IE7. The slot is a bit small for the topic, but I'll try my best to create interest. Indeed you can catch me around talks to chat about it, and...

    Secondly, there will be a BoF "Discussing Community Data Analytics" on Monday at 10:30 in room 127. We hope to see people coming up with interesting questions to explore or willing to lend a hand in those explorations. See you there!

  • The birth of a new runtime

    Runtimes are a core part of the flatpak design. They are a way to make bundling feasible, while still fully isolating from the host system. Application authors can bundle the libraries specific to the application, but don’t have to care about the lowlevel dependencies that are uninteresting (yet important) for the application.

    Many people think of runtimes primarily as a way to avoid duplication (and thus bloat). However, they play two other important roles. First of all they allow an independent stream of updates for core libraries, so even dead apps get fixes. And secondly, they allow the work of the bundling to be shared between all application authors.

    [...]

    This runtime has the same name, and its content is very similar, but it is really a complete re-implementation. It is based on a new build system called BuildStream, which is much nicer and a great fit for flatpak. So, no more Yocto, no more buildbake, no multi-layer builds!

    Additionally, it has an entire group of people working on it, including support from Codethink. Its already using gitlab, with automatic builds, CI, etc, etc. There is also a new release model (year.month) with a well-defined support time. Also, all the packages are much newer!

    Gnome is also looking at using this as the basics for its releases, its CI system and eventually the Gnome runtime.

Intel IWD Wireless Daemon v0.6 Released

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Linux

Out today is a new version of IWD, the Intel-developed wireless daemon for Linux systems. IWD v0.6 is the latest version which is actually a quick follow-up release to address bugs from IWD v0.5 issued this morning.

IWD 0.5 added support for using agents with EAP-GTC methods, improved support for "known networks" management, support for Simultaneous Authentication of Equals, now exposes supported modes of operation, and can support D-Bus auto-activation via systemd.

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Kernel, LF and Graphics: New Features, Hyperledger Global Forum, RadeonSI Gallium3D

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux 4.19 Certainly Is Going To Be A Big Kernel

    At the end of July I outlined some of the changes queued for Linux 4.19 while since then several more notable additions have become aligned for this next kernel cycle following the one week delay of Linux 4.18.

    Linux 4.18 should be out this weekend, which itself is bringing many changes, and in turn will mark the opening of the two week long merge window for 4.19.

  • Linux Live Kernel Patching Is On The Way For 64-bit ARM

    It's been a while since having any advancements to report on the live kernel patching front for being able to deploy primarily Linux kernel security fixes without having to reboot the system. There is some new progress on that front to report on now and that is the 64-bit ARM (ARM64/AArch64) support getting squared away.

  • Linux EDAC Support For AMD's Great Horned Owl

    The latest Linux kernel patch is for supporting ECC error detection via the Error Detection And Correction (EDAC) code with AMD's Great Horned Owl.

    Great Horned Owl is the codename for Family 17h Model 11h hardware, which is what launched back in February as the Ryzen Embedded V1000 series chips.

  • Linux Kernel Expectations For AMD Threadripper 2

    If you have already pre-ordered your AMD Threadripper 2990WX processor or just planning to be an early customer of that high-end desktop processor or the Threadripper 2950X, you may be wondering about Linux requirements from these new high-end AMD CPU offerings. Here's the gist of the Linux support state of AMD Zen+ CPUs for those wanting to get ready for Threadripper 2.

    There's still a few days to go until the global embargo expires for sharing Threadripper 2990WX/2950X performance benchmarks and reviews, at which time you'll be able to see my full Linux analysis of these new processors with plenty of tests... But for today we're just talking in general terms about Linux support requirements.

  • Keynote Sneak Peek for Hyperledger Global Forum – See Who’s Speaking

    Attend Hyperledger Global Forum to see real uses of distributed ledger technologies for business and to learn how these innovative technologies run live in production networks across the globe today. Hyperledger Global Forum will cut through the hype and focus on adoption. Attendees will see first-hand how the largest organizations in the world go beyond experimentation to lead blockchain production applications with measurable impact. Make your plans now to attend the premier blockchain event of 2018.

  • More OpenGL Extensions For RadeonSI Are The Latest In A Flurry Of Interesting Activity

    Marek Olšák has continued his busy work on the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver by implementing more extensions and adjusting various limits/constants to match the behavior of their proprietary driver.

    In the past few days Marek has fleshed out the EQAA GL extensions, ASTC compression for Gallium drivers, and yesterday was EXT_gpu_shader4 support for vintage/legacy OpenGL 2 applications.

  • Intel SSD 660p: 512GB Of NVMe Storage For $99 USD

A quick guide to switching from Windows to Linux

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GNU
Linux

Windows is hands down the most popular Operating System in the world. Being the most popular however doesn’t necessarily mean it is the best. Windows can be so nagging sometimes, especially with updates. Don’t get me started on the whole malware issue. It is the most targetted Operating System and that makes sense due to its shear scale of numbers. Also, not many people are fans of the one-size-fits-all that Windows is using on its consumer-grade system.

That said, if you are unhappy with your Windows experience, you could invest in a Mac or sell a kidney and get yourself their usually overpriced hardware to run their Operating System MacOS. But since you already have decent hardware with you, the world of Linux could very well be your next destination.

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Also: How to Install Linux Mint 19 Tara? | The Complete Installation Guide

Elementary OS Juno Brings Only Slight Changes to an Outstanding Platform

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OS
Linux

Elementary OS has been my distribution of choice for some time now. I find it a perfect blend of usability, elegance, and stability. Out of the box, Elementary doesn’t include a lot of apps, but it does offer plenty of style and all the apps you could want are an AppCenter away. And with the upcoming release, the numbering scheme changes. Named Juno, the next iteration will skip the .5 number and go directly to 5.0. Why? Because Elementary OS is far from a pre-release operating system and the development teams wanted to do away with any possible confusion.

Elementary, 0.4 (aka Loki) is about as stable a Linux operating system as I have ever used. And although Elementary OS 5.0 does promise to be a very natural evolution from .4, it is still very much in beta, but ready for testing. Because Juno is based on Ubuntu 18.04, it enjoys a rock-solid base, so the foundation of the OS will already be incredibly stable.

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RISC-V and NVIDIA

  • Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform Enlists Deep Learning Accelerator
    SiFive introduces what it’s calling the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. A demo shown at the Hot Chips conference consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive's HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive's silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • SiFive Announces First Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform With NVIDIA Deep Learning Accelerator Technology
    SiFive, the leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. The demo will be shown this week at the Hot Chips conference and consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive's HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the world's first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is well suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive's silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • SiFive Announces Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform with Nvidia Deep Learning Accelerator Technology
    SiFive, a leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA’s Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. The demo will be shown this week at the Hot Chips conference and consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive’s HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the world’s first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is well suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive’s silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • NVIDIA Unveils The GeForce RTX 20 Series, Linux Benchmarks Should Be Coming
    NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang has just announced the GeForce RTX 2080 series from his keynote ahead of Gamescom 2018 this week in Cologne, Germany.
  • NVIDIA have officially announced the GeForce RTX 2000 series of GPUs, launching September
    The GPU race continues on once again, as NVIDIA have now officially announced the GeForce RTX 2000 series of GPUs and they're launching in September. This new series will be based on their Turing architecture and their RTX platform. These new RT Cores will "enable real-time ray tracing of objects and environments with physically accurate shadows, reflections, refractions and global illumination." which sounds rather fun.

today's leftovers

GNOME Shell, Mutter, and Ubuntu's GNOME Theme

Benchmarks on GNU/Linux

  • Linux vs. Windows Benchmark: Threadripper 2990WX vs. Core i9-7980XE Tested
    The last chess benchmark we’re going to look at is Crafty and again we’re measuring performance in nodes per second. Interestingly, the Core i9-7980XE wins out here and saw the biggest performance uplift when moving to Linux, a 5% performance increase was seen opposed to just 3% for the 2990WX and this made the Intel CPU 12% faster overall.
  • Which is faster, rsync or rdiff-backup?
    As our data grows (and some filesystems balloon to over 800GBs, with many small files) we have started seeing our night time backups continue through the morning, causing serious disk i/o problems as our users wake up and regular usage rises. For years we have implemented a conservative backup policy - each server runs the backup twice: once via rdiff-backup to the onsite server with 10 days of increments kept. A second is an rsync to our offsite backup servers for disaster recovery. Simple, I thought. I will change the rdiff-backup to the onsite server to use the ultra fast and simple rsync. Then, I'll use borgbackup to create an incremental backup from the onsite backup server to our off site backup servers. Piece of cake. And with each server only running one backup instead of two, they should complete in record time. Except, some how the rsync backup to the onsite backup server was taking almost as long as the original rdiff-backup to the onsite server and rsync backup to the offsite server combined. What? I thought nothing was faster than the awesome simplicity of rsync, especially compared to the ancient python-based rdiff-backup, which hasn't had an upstream release since 2009.