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Kernel and LF: Linux 5, FOSSology Turns 10, Xen Project Interview

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Linux
  • Linus Torvalds Wants Linux Kernel 5.0 To Be “Meaningless” And “Unpredictable”

    If you follow Linux kernel development closely, you must be knowing that major version transitioning, i.e., jump from Linux 2.0 to 3.0 and 3.0 to 4.0, has taken place in the past at every two million Git objects. This made perfect sense to make a transition to Linux v5.0 at 6 million Git objects landmark.

    [...]

    The announcement post also contained some information on Linux 4.17-rc1 release. He mentioned that apart from dropping many older and outdated architectures, the kernel development team is also adding support for a new architecture: nds32 (Andes Technology 32-0bit RISC architecture).

    Interestingly, this release is also historic as for the first time the team has removed more lines than it added. Again, that’s due to dropping a number of architectures.

  • FOSSology Turns 10 – A Decade of Highlights

    FOSSology turns ten this year. Far from winding down, the open source license compliance project is still going strong. The interest in the project among its thriving community has not dampened in the least, and regular contributions and cross-project contributors are steering it toward productive and meaningful iterations.

    An example is the recent 3.2 release, offering significant improvements over previous versions, such as the import of SDPX files and word processor document output summarizing analysis information. Even so, the overall project goal remains the same: to make it easier to understand and comply with the licenses used in open source software.

    There are thousands of licenses used in Open Source software these days, with some differing by only a few words and others pertaining to entirely different use universes. Together, they present a bewildering quagmire of requirements that must be adhered to, but only as set out in the appropriate license(s), the misunderstanding or absence of which can revert rights to a reserved status and bring about a complete halt to distribution.  

  • Xen Project Contributor Spotlight: Stefano Stabellini

    I started contributing to Xen Project in 2008. At that time, I was working for Citrix in the XenServer product team. I have been contributing every year since then, that makes it 10 years now!

Best Linux Distro for Programming

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Linux

Linux-based operating systems (often called Linux Distributions, or just Distros) are quite popular among programmers and developers since their announcement in the 90s. The Linux kernel itself is designed to be flexible and open for modifications and contributions, thus it can run on any hardware. The same principle is applied to almost the whole software stack above the kernel that constitutes the Linux Distribution as a complete product. In general, it is designed from programmers for programmers and freely available to everyone.

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96Boards CE Extended SBC runs Linux or AOSP on Kirin 970

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Linux

Lenovator has opened $299 pre-orders on LeMaker’s 96Boards CE Extended “HiKey 970” SBC, which offers an octa-core Kirin 970 SoC, 6GB LPDDR4, 64GB UFS storage, wireless, GbE, M.2, and CAN.

The HiKey 970 was partially unveiled in March by Linaro as part of its joint announcement of a 96Boards.ai program for unleashing the potential of AI technology on Arm SoCs. The LeMaker version of the HiKey 970 — the board will also be offered by Hoperun — is now available for presale for $299 by Lemaker distributor Lenovator, with shipments due by the end of April.

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Microsoft Linux, Linux 4.17, and Linux 5.0

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Linux
  • Microsoft built its own custom Linux kernel for its new IoT service [Ed: After Microsoft repeatedly violated the GPL and while Microsoft is blackmailing companies for using Linux. The 'new Microsoft': we exploit you while we attack you while lying about it and paying those who would otherwise complain about it.]

    At a small press event in San Francisco, Microsoft today announced the launch of a secure end-to-end IoT product that focuses on microcontroller-based devices — the kind of devices that use tiny and relatively low-powered microcontrollers (MCUs) for basic control or connectivity features. Typically, these kinds of devices, which could be anything from a toy to a household gadget or an industrial application, don’t often get updated and hence, security often suffers.

  • Linus Torvalds Kicks Off Linux 4.17 Development, Teases the Linux 5.0 Release

    Two weeks after the launch of Linux kernel 4.16, Linus Torvalds kicked off the development cycle of the Linux 4.17 kernel series by releasing the first Release Candidate (RC) build.

    At the end of every Linux kernel development cycle, the merge window opens for the next release, in this case, Linux 4.17. Now, two weeks later, the merge window is closed, and public testers can start downloading, compiling, and installing the upcoming Linux 4.17 kernel on their favorite GNU/Linux distributions.

  • Linus Torvalds says Linux kernel v5.0 'should be meaningless'

    Following the release of Linux kernel 4.16, Linus Torvalds has said that the next kernel will be version 5.0. Or maybe it won't, because version numbers are meaningless.

    The announcement -- of sorts -- came in Torvalds' message over the weekend about the first release candidate for version 4.17. He warns that it is not "shaping up to be a particularly big release" and questions whether it even matters what version number is slapped on the final release.

Mainline Linux Kernel Almost Ready For Finally Supporting Unprivileged FUSE Mounts

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Linux

While the Linux 4.17 merge window officially closed yesterday with the release of Linux 4.17-rc1, FUSE maintainer Miklos Szeredi is now trying to get his changes added.

With FUSE (File-Systems in User-Space) updates being uncommon these days, Miklos forgot about sending them into the Linux 4.17 merge window but today is trying to get them added.

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Clonezilla Live Disk Cloning OS Gets New Massive Deployment BitTorrent Mechanism

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GNU
Linux

The open source and freely distributed Clonezilla Live disk cloning and imaging live system recently received a new stable release that adds several new features, enhancements, and other changes.

Clonezilla Live 2.5.5-38 is now the latest stable release of the live system based on the open-source partition and disk imaging and cloning Clonezilla software. It's synced with the software repositories of the Debian Sid operating system series and uses a recent kernel from the Linux 4.15 branch.

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Linux Foundation LFCS: James Medeiros

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Linux
Interviews

I spent my formative years glued to the CRT screen of my 486. In 1997 I was 12 years old and had discovered the local, text-only FreeNet -- my portal to the world's collective knowledge via 2400 baud modem. I quickly became familiar with the Lynx browser and eventually found the Schoolnet MOO (an object-oriented MUD which is still running today) where I made fast friends and began to explore basic coding in the environment. In high school, I was fortunate enough to have a fabulous teacher who gave us free time to experiment with installing our choice of operating systems on machines with swappable hard drives. My first Linux distribution was Mandriva (Mandrake at the time), but I've only recently made the switch to Linux as my primary OS.

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Linux and the beauty of browser-based games

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Linux
Gaming

Judged across all platforms and architectures, Linux is the most popular operating system on the planet, surpassing even Microsoft Windows. But one aspect of computing that the open source operating has trailed the Windows operating system is desktop gaming, where Linux only occupies a small percentage of the (desktop) market. As a result many of the most popular Windows desktop games are not available on Linux. So Windows users contemplating switching to Linux must first answer this question: Is my favorite Windows desktop game available on Linux?

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Tiny, rugged IoT gateways offer 10-year Linux support

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Linux

Moxa announced a line of rugged, compact “UC 2100” IoT gateways that run 10-year available Moxa Industrial Linux and optional ThingsPro Gateway middleware on a Cortex-A8 SoC.

Moxa announced the UC-2100 Series industrial IoT gateways along with its new UC 3100 and UC 5100 Series, but it offered details only on the UC-2100. All three series will offer ruggedization features, compact footprints, and on some models, 4G LTE support. They all run Moxa Industrial Linux and optional ThingsPro Gateway data acquisition software on Arm-based SoCs.

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10 Best Media Server Software for Linux in 2018

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GNU
Linux
Movies

A media server is simply a specialized file server or computer system for storing media (digital videos/movies, audio/music, and images) which can be accessed over a network.

In order to setup a media server, you need computer hardware (or perhaps a cloud server) as well as a software that enables you to organize your media files, and makes it easier to stream and/or share them with friends and family.

In this article, we will share with you a list of 10 best media server software for Linux systems. By the time you complete this article, you will be able to choose the most appropriate software to setup your home/office/cloud media server powered by a Linux system.

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Also: 5 Reasons Kodi Users Should Just Switch To Plex Already

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