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Linux

Sparky 2021.10

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Sparky 2021.10 of the (semi-)rolling line is out; it is based on Debian testing “Bookworm”.

This iso update provides:
– all packages upgraded as of October 12, 2021
– Linux kernel 5.14.9
– Calamares 3.2.44.3
– i386 libs removed from amd64 iso images
– small improvements

No reinstallation is required if you installed Sparky 2021.09, simply keep it up to date.

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Microsoft and CNET confuse users with fake “This PC can’t run Windows 11” errors. Suggest buying a completely new computer.

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft and CNET confuse users with fake “This PC can’t run Windows 11” errors. Suggest buying a completely new computer.

Mostly, if your machine doesn’t have “Security Theater Boot” and the “Toilet Paper Module” (I jest.) available to be turned on, you need to buy another computer.

Except that you don’t. You could format Windows off your computer entirely and go on happily using GNU/Linux for many more years without fake incompatibility messages from your pals at Microsoft and Intel, where sales have been in the dumps and they need fake error messages to drive new sales.

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Audiocasts/Shows: LINUX Unplugged, mintCast, Linux in the Ham Shack

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Life Changing Virtualization | LINUX Unplugged 427

    Wimpy stops by with a new tool that will change your virtualization game, and we share our thoughts on Ubuntu 21.10 and take the flavor challenge.

  • mintCast 371.5 – Minus One

    1:37 Linux Innards
    35:41 Vibrations from the Ether
    50:04 Check This Out
    53:53 Announcements & Outro

  • LHS Episode #434: Linux Install Media Deep Dive

    Hello and welcome to the 434th installment of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts discuss creating bootable images to start your computer with Linux or install the operating system. Discussion ranges from CDs to DVDS, USB flash drives and Micro SD cards. Also touched on are persistence, running distros from install media, dual booting and more. We hope you enjoy this episode and come back for the next one. Have a great week.

Clapper – A New Gnome Media Player for Linux

Filed under
Linux
GNOME

Clapper is a free and open-source media player. It was built for GNOME using GJS with the GTK4 toolkit. For its media backend, Clapper uses GStreamer, and it renders everything via OpenGL. The app is built with memory friendliness in mind.

It ships with all the features you expect in a basic media player and more. This includes windowed, floating, and full-screen viewing modes. Other features include using playlists from a file, floating mode, and hardware acceleration.

Note that working with playlists is feature-limited in Flatpak version to contents of user “Videos” directory by default. Clapper can only open playlist files with the .claps file extension. There should be a single file path per line which can be either relative or absolute. Playlists can also contain HTTP links instead of file paths.

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WSL is now Available as an App via Windows Store. But why?

Filed under
Linux
News

Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) is reconfigured by Microsoft to be deployed by Windows store as an app. We investigate the reason behind this move in this article.
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Video/Audio: CLI, Firefox Keylogging, and Full Circle Weekly

Filed under
GNU
Linux

GNOME: Platform Design Goings On

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

The GNOME design team has recently been working on GNOME’s application development platform, and I thought that it might be interesting for people to hear about what we’ve been up to.

The following is an overview of our recent platform design activities, particularly libadwaita. It will give an idea of what is currently going into the GNOME platform from a UXD perspective, as well as some of things that people might expect from the platform in the future.

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Also: GNOME's Platform Design Continues Evolving From Dark Mode To Toast

Intel: DG2, AMX, and MPX

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Intel Posts Latest DG2/Alchemist Linux Patches In Requiring 64K Page Size Handling - Phoronix

    While Linux 5.15 brings very early bits around DG2/Alchemist graphics card support, further work is needed to bring it into usable shape for end-users. The latest new patch series to be posted came out today with more driver changes needed around local device memory handling for DG2.

    New with DG2 is that the hardware only is supporting 64K page sizes and larger. The i915 device memory for DG2 and future discrete graphics can only support 64K or larger for the GTT page size even if using say 4K for the kernel page size on x86_64 systems.

  • Linux x86 FPU Code Getting Reworked In Preparation For Intel AMX - Phoronix

    It's been one year now that Intel has been posting Linux kernel patches to enable AMX support for upcoming Sapphire Rapids processors. Over the past year their Linux kernel patches for enabling Advanced Matrix Extensions has gone through 11 rounds of review but that journey isn't over yet.

  • Glibc 2.35 Removes The Long-Deprecated Intel MPX Support - Phoronix

    Intel Memory Protection Extensions (MPX) never really took off and the Linux support has been deprecated for a while with the code elsewhere in the stack already having been removed while with the upcoming Glibc 2.35 release that GNU C Library is also flushing away its support.

Multiboot USB Creator Ventoy Adds a GUI Mode to Its Live ISO Image

Filed under
Linux
News
Software

If you haven’t heard of Ventoy before, let me tell that it’s a recently new bootable USB creation solution that works just by copying the image files of the operating systems you want to have a flash drive without formatting it over and over.

There are many great tools out there to create multiboot USB drivers, but Ventoy makes it easier than ever and supports almost all known GNU/Linux distributions, as well as Windows OSes up to Windows 11, Chrome OS, BSD, and other UNIX systems.

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Top 5 Most Stable Linux Distributions in 2021

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux is one of the utmost famous and free open-source platforms. Linux has recently gained a lot of attention and is widely used due to its security, scalability, and flexibility. The distribution named Linux does all the hard work for you by taking codes from open-source till compiling and then combining them into a single operating system so that you’re easily able to boot up and install. Furthermore, they also provide you with different options such as the default desktop environment, browser, and other software. Users can get an operating system by installing one of the most stable Linux distros.

Linux has numerous distinct features for different users. There are lots of Linux distributions for a variety of uses, including education, gaming, and developing software. Somehow I can find so many different Linux distributions that I can’t even remember the exact numbers. There are some unique tendencies, revealed in some clones of each other. So it’s kind of confusing. But that’s the beauty of Linux. Few features of Linux distributions are quite identical to one another, but some distributions have their own user interface and unique features.

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5 Best Ways To Secure Your Linux System Distribution

There are many ways to secure your Linux system distribution. Today, cyber attacks and computer hacking can be prevented by bolstering security systems. By securing a Linux system, a computer is shielded from identity theft, data extraction, and other forms of malware. Different ways of securing a Linux system can teach users how to avoid spam, scams, and phishing campaigns. As a Linux developer, you should follow basic principles to increase privacy, security and stability. In this article, we’ll discuss the best ways you can secure your Linux system. Enable full disk encryption (FDE) to secure your Linux system. You should encrypt your entire hard disk regardless of which operating system you are using. This will ensure that your data remains secure if the device is stolen. First, take advantage of full disk encryption at install time if possible. By encrypting your hard disk, a criminal will be unable to extract your information without an FDE password. Encrypt your full disk so you don’t have to worry about temporary files, swap files, or other directories containing sensitive information. Furthermore, you will notice that encrypting your full disk allows your computer to function at a similar level of performance. Certainly, consider FDE as a cybersecurity tip to help Linux users protect their computers. Read more

Radeon RX 6600 Linux Performance Rising Even Higher With Newest Open-Source Driver

Just one week ago was the public launch of the Radeon RX 6600 as the newest offering in the RDNA2 GPU line-up. While in our Radeon RX 6600 Linux review the performance was good on AMD's well regarded open-source driver stack and standing ground against the likes of the GeForce RTX 3060 with NVIDIA's proprietary Linux driver, it turns out the RX 6600 Linux performance can be even better already. Here are benchmarks of the Radeon RX 6600 on Linux across six different driver configurations. In particular, it appears that the driver state around 1 October that was used for the launch-day RX 6600 Linux review is actually less than ideal -- there appears to have been a regression around that point and with newer (as well as 21.2 stable) driver code there can be measurable gains to Linux gaming performance. Read more