Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

New Stable Kernel and Fingerprint Readers' Support in Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.17.1 Kernel Released

    For those that prefer waiting until the first point release of a new kernel series before upgrading, Linux 4.17.1 is out today.

    Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the Linux 4.17.1 kernel today barely a week and a half since 4.17.0 made its initial debut. It's largely been quiet on the 4.17 front with 4.17.1 containing just a handful of bug fixes affecting PCI, network, and other minor driver fixes representing a bulk of the changes. Only about one hundred lines of code was shifted around for this initial point release and none of the fixes are security related.

  • Fingerprint reader support, the second coming

    Fingerprint readers are more and more common on Windows laptops, and hardware makers would really like to not have to make a separate SKU without the fingerprint reader just for Linux, if that fingerprint reader is unsupported there.

    The original makers of those fingerprint readers just need to send patches to the libfprint Bugzilla, I hear you say, and the problem's solved!

    But it turns out it's pretty difficult to write those new drivers, and those patches, without an insight on how the internals of libfprint work, and what all those internal, undocumented APIs mean.

    Most of the drivers already present in libfprint are the results of reverse engineering, which means that none of them is a best-of-breed example of a driver, with all the unknown values and magic numbers.

Chromebooks Now Run Android, GNU/Linux and Windows Software (via CodeWeavers/Wine)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • CodeWeavers Demo a Windows app Running on a Chromebook using Linux and Wine

    As you may know Google is bringing Linux apps to Chromebooks — but did you realise that the feature could pave the way for Windows apps, too?

    Yup, we’re talking Wine, the Windows software compatibility that is a staple part of the Linux app ecosystem.

    Be it for Adobe Photoshop or games like Fortnite and WoW, Wine is the go-to fudge when you need an app that lacks a native Linux equivalent.

  • Here are all the Chromebooks that run Android and Linux apps

    In May of 2016, Google first announced that it would be releasing updates to Chrome OS that would allow Android apps on Chromebook. While the rollout of suppport for Android apps on Chromebook devices has been slow, there are now a healthy number of first and third-party devices that can run the hundreds of millions of apps available from the Google Play Store. In May 2016, Google revealed that it would also start adding Linux app support to Chromebooks by lacing them in a Debian-based virtual machine. The company’s own Pixelbook is the first Chromebook that can run Linux apps, although just in a preview release.

  • Acer Chromebook 13 and Spin 13 may be first Chromebooks to ship with day-1 Linux app support

    Google revealed Linux app support for Chromebooks at this year's I/O conference, but at the time the only supported device was the first-party Pixelbook. The 2nd device to get the feature was Samsung's ARM-powered Chromebook Plus, and other recently released devices Like HP's Chromebook x2 haven't had Linux app support at all. But, if a recent commit is any indicator, Acer's Chromebook 13 and Chromebook Spin 13 may be the first Chromebooks to run Linux apps from day 1, no update necessary.

  • Linux apps on Chromebooks makes running Windows apps easier

    Now that Google is allowing users of (some) Chromebooks to run Linux applications alongside Chrome apps, there’s an odd side effect: it’s also easier to run some Windows applications.

    CrossOver from CodeWeavers is a utility that adds a compatibility layer to Mac and Linux that allows you to install and run some Windows applications on those platforms. A few years ago the developers of CrossOver released an Android version that could run on Chromebooks that support Android apps.

Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSD Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

Last month Samsung introduced the 970 Series solid-state drives with the mainstream 970 EVO models and 970 PRO models for professionals/enthusiasts. The 970 Series moves to a 64-layer flash and uses a five-core Phoenix controller. For those curious about the Samsung 970 EVO performance under Linux, I have carried out some quick benchmarks to show off its potential under Ubuntu.

Read more

Automation controller upgraded with new Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

Filed under
Linux

Techbase has upgraded its Linux-powered ModBerry M500 controller with the RPi 3 Model B+ SBC, advancing to a 1.4GHz SoC, GbE, and dual-band WiFi-ac. The launch follows several new NanoPi and Orange Pi based ModBerry M300 models.

Techbase announced the availability of a new version of its ModBerry M500 industrial control computer (also called the ModBerry NPE M500), which advances from the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B to the new Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ SBC. The updated ModBerry M500 offers a more powerful, feature-rich alternative to the ModBerry 500, which is based on the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3), as well as the ModBerry 500 M3, which combines the RPi 3-like CM3 with an ESP32 module.

Read more

Desktop: Themes, Plasma, GNOME Boxes, Mageia, Fedora and Voice Chat Software for Linux Gaming

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Top 30 Best Ubuntu Themes That Will Blow Your Mind

    Over the last year, we covered different themes for Ubuntu; most of them being GTK themes inspired by material design and flat design. It has been a while since our last theme article and I figure today will be a day to present you with a somewhat mega list.

    My compilation includes a few themes already featured on FossMint together with others you probably haven’t heard about yet. If you are keen on personalization and UI beauty then I’m sure that my compilation will blow your mind.

  • Release AnnouncementsPlasma 5.13.0
  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Now Available, OpenGear's New NetOps Automation Platform, New Zynthian Raspberry Pi Synthesizer and More

    KDE released Plasma 5.13.0 today. The team has "spent the last four months optimising startup and minimising memory usage, yielding faster time-to-desktop, better runtime performance and less memory consumption. Basic features like panel popups were optimised to make sure they run smoothly even on the lowest-end hardware. Our design teams have not rested either, producing beautiful new integrated lock and login screen graphics." New features in Plasma 5.13 include Plasma Browser Integration, redesigned system settings, new look for lock and login screens, improved KWin graphics compositor and more. See the release announcement for links to download pages for live images, distro packages and source.

  • Contributing to Boxes

    I have to admit that Boxes is a bit late for the Flatpak party, but that’s not a problem. The technical difficulties of getting a virtualization hypervisor to run inside the flatpak sandbox are mostly overcomed. This way, contributing to Boxes has never been easier.

    In the following sections I will describe the step-by-step process of making your first code contribution to GNOME Boxes.

  • Mageia at RMLL – and a roundup

    RMLL  (also known as LSM, Libre Software Meeting) is one of Mageia’s important annual events and 2018 is no different. It’s the premier world meeting for Libre Software, upon the principles of which our distro and our community is based.

    This year RMLL is to be held in in Strasbourg, and we have a booth! We’re calling for people to come and spend a little time on the stand, or a lot of time if you have a lot – we need Mageians to come talk to people about our distro, and encourage them to try us out, join the community and contribute in any way they want. It’s also a great opportunity to meet a wide variety of people in the Libre Software community, both developers and users, and catch up on what’s happening in our world.

  • GLPI version 9.3

    GLPI (Free IT and asset management software) version 9.3~RC2 is available. RPM are available in remi-glpi93 repository for Fedora ≥ 25 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 6.

  • Best Free Voice Chat Software for Linux Gaming

    It’s estimated that more than 1.4 billion people play computer games, with about 750 million of them participating in online gaming. That’s a colossal market for Linux to tap. The design of online games is diverse, ranging from simple text-based environments to the incorporation of complex graphics and immersive virtual worlds.

    Although gamers rely on their keyboards, communicating with fellow players with the keyboard is often arduous, and an unnecessary distraction when in-game. While shortcut keys can streamline communicating, nothing compares to the convenience of being able to talk into a headset, and share messages in real time.

Linux: NOVA Filesystem, Systemd 239, LF Deep Learning Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • New NOVA Filesystem

    Andiry Xu (working with Lu Zhang, Steven Swanson and others) posted patches for a new filesystem called NOVA (NOn-Volatile memory Accelerated). Normal RAM chips are wiped every time you turn off your computer. Non-volatile RAM retains its data across reboots. Their project targeted byte-addressable non-volatile memory chips, such as Intel's 3DXpoint DIMMs. Andiry said that the current incarnation of their code was able to do a lot already, but they still had a big to-do list, and they wanted feedback from the kernel people.

    Theodore Y. Ts'o gave the patches a try, but he found that they wouldn't even compile without some fixes, which he posted in reply. Andiry said they'd adapt those fixes into their patches.

    The last time NOVA made an appearance on the kernel mailing list was August 2017, when Steven made a similar announcement. This time around, they posted a lot more patches, including support for SysFS controls, Kconfig compilation options and a significant amount of documentation.

  • Systemd 239 Is Being Prepped For Release With Many Changes

    Systemd developers have begun wrangling the v239 release together. Among the features coming are a change where the network interface device naming may now be different (though it seems to primarily affect SR-IOV/NPAR situations), support for using the RestrictNamespaces property multiple times, the sd-boot systemd boot functionality has new configuration settings so you can turn off Windows/macOS partition discovery, sd-boot should now pick a better screen resolution when booting a HiDPI system, systemd-resolve has been renamed to resolvectl, a NoNewPrivileges property has been added to turn off acquiring of new privileges system-wide, swap files should now work for hibernation now, networkd now automatically uses the kernel's route expiration feature, documentation improvements, and many other changes.

  • LF Deep Learning Foundation Announces Project Contribution Process

    I am very pleased to announce that the LF Deep Learning Foundation has approved a project lifecycle and contribution process to enable the contribution, support and growth of artificial intelligence, machine learning and deep learning open source projects. With these documents in place, the LF Deep Learning Foundation is now accepting proposals for the contribution of projects.

    The LF Deep Learning Foundation, a community umbrella project of The Linux Foundation with the mission of supporting artificial intelligence, machine learning and deep learning open source projects, is working to build a self-sustaining ecosystem of projects. Having a clear roadmap for how to contribute projects is a first step. Contributed projects operate under their own technical governance with collaboration resources allocated and provided by the LF Deep Learning Foundation’s Governing Board. Membership in the LF Deep Learning Foundation is not required to propose a project contribution.

Intel in Linux 4.19 and MIPS

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Intel Begins Queuing Graphics Driver Improvements For Linux 4.19

    While the Linux 4.18 kernel merge window isn't even over until the end of the week followed by about eight weeks worth of testing before that kernel version will debut as stable, Intel open-source developers have already sent in their first pull request to DRM-Next of material they would like to begin staging for Linux 4.19.

    Intel's OTC developers are usually quite punctual in queuing up their tested work in DRM-Next for the next kernel cycle while even for their standards this is quite early with there being several days left to the current merge window.

  • Linux Kernel Patches Appear For A Line Of Intel MIPS SoCs

    It appears Intel is launching a line of SoCs based on the MIPS architecture.

    Hitting the kernel mailing list overnight is a set of kernel patches for bringing up the Intel GRX500 SoCs, which are based on the MIPS interAptiv design. MIPS interAptiv processor cores are based on a 32-bit, multi-core design and have been available the past few years. Background information on interAptiv is available from MIPS.com.

Linux Kernel 4.17 Now Ready for Mass Deployments as First Point Release Is Out

Filed under
Linux

Even if it's a small one changing only 23 files, with 131 insertions and 68 deletions, the Linux kernel 4.17.1 point release marks the Linux 4.17 kernel series as ready for mass deployments, which means that OS vendors can now start compiling it for their supported architectures and GNU/Linux operating systems to distribute the new kernel version to their users.

"I'm announcing the release of the 4.17.1 kernel. All users of the 4.17 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.17.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.17.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux stable.git;a=summary," said Greg Kroah-Hartman in the mailing list announcement.

Read more

Stable kernels 4.17.1, 4.16.15 and 4.14.49

Filed under
Linux

Zynthian Open Source Raspberry Pi Synthesiser

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Musicians may be interested in a new fully open source Raspberry Pi synthesiser aptly named the Zynthian which provides a “new class of machine” described as a “swiss army knife of synthesis, equipped with multiple engines, filters and effects”. The Raspberry Pi synthesiser is completely configurable and upgradable and offers an open platform for Sound Synthesis based on the awesome Raspberry Pi mini PC and Linux operating system making the synthesiser fully hackable.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation on Value of GNU/Linux Skills

  • Jobs Report: Rapid Growth in Demand for Open-Source Tech Talent
    The need for open-source technology skills are on the rise and companies and organizations continue to increase their recruitment of open-source technology talent, while offering additional training and certification opportunities for existing staff in order to fill skills gaps, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report, released today by The Linux Foundation and Dice. 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open-source talent, and nearly half (48%) report their organizations have begun to support open-source projects with code or other resources for the explicit reason of recruiting individuals with those software skills. After a hiatus, Linux skills are back on top as the most sought after skill with 80% of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise. 55% of employers are now also offering to pay for employee certifications, up from 47% in 2017 and only 34% in 2016.
  • Market value of open source skills on the up
    The demand for open source technology skills is soaring, however, 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open source talent, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report which was released this week.
  • SD Times news digest: Linux Foundation releases open-source jobs report, Android Studio 3.2 beta and Rust 1.27
    The Linux Foundation in collaboration with Dice.com has revealed the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report. The report is designed to examine trends in open-source careers as well as find out which skills are the most in demand. Key findings included 83 percent of hiring managers believes hiring open source talent is a priority and Linux is the most in-demand open-source skill. In addition, 57 percent of hiring managers are looking for people with container skills and many organizations are starting to get more involved in open-source in order to attract developers.

GNU/Linux Servers as Buzzwords: "Cloud" and "IaaS"

  • Linux: The new frontier of enterprise in the cloud
    Well obviously, like you mentioned, we've been a Linux company for a long time. We've really seen Linux expand along the lines of a lot of the things that are happening in the enterprise. We're seeing more and more enterprise infrastructure become software centric or software defined. Red Hat's expanded their portfolio in storage, in automation with the Ansible platform. And then the really big trend lately with Linux has been Linux containers and technologies like [Google] Cooper Netties. So, we're seeing enterprises want to build new applications. We're seeing the infrastructure be more software defined. Linux ends up becoming the foundation for a lot of the things going on in enterprise IT these days.
  • Why next-generation IaaS is likely to be open source
    This is partly down to Kubernetes, which has done much to popularise container technology, helped by its association with Docker and others, which has ushered in a period of explosive innovation in the ‘container platform’ space. This is where Kubernetes stands out, and today it could hold the key to the future of IaaS.

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more