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Linux Devices and Tizen

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  • Industrial Internet of Things Set to Rocket Towards 100bn Devices
  • Build Your Own Raspberry Pi Camera

    During the past few years, my BirdCam setup has evolved significantly. As I mention in the UpFront section of this issue, I hope to get the stream transferred to a YouTube Live stream at some point, so I can watch the feathery show on my television. And although watching the birds is the end goal, I'm constantly on a mission to improve the quality and flexibility of my setup.

  • COM Express Type 6 and Type 7 modules feature security chip

    Kontron’s Linux-ready Intel 6th Gen Type 6 and 5th Gen Type 7 COM Express modules integrate its new Security Solution Approtect technology.

  • Huawei Honor S1 Smartwatch Launched, Not Android Wear, Not Likely Tizen either

    Today, Huawei unveiled their next smartwatch branded as the Honor S1. We previously reported on the possibility that this new wearable device would run Tizen. According to a report in the JoongAng Ilbo newspaper Huawei are currently working with Samsung to deploy the Tizen operating system in its next smartwatches. Well today the unveil happened and strangely enough there is no mention of Android Wear in any of the supporting documentation, but also there is no mention of Tizen either ! Looking at the User Interface (UI) it definitely isn’t an Android Wear device, as Google will not let OEMs alter its appearance, but more of a bespoke Operating System (OS).

  • Game: War Thunder for Samsung Z1, Z2, Z3 [Ed: Mono...]

    More action games come rolling in as War Thunder is released on the Tizen Store for Tizen smartphones. This is a Unity game that has been released for the Tizen platform. The game is brought to you by Pham Dinh, the same person that brought you Action Strike, Zombie Reborn, Call of Duty , and Danger Run.

Linux Foundation and Linux

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  • Surprise release candidate of Linux 4.9 kernel has element from Project Ara

    I suppose I should introduce myself. I’m Private 78523 Benjamin Carly Rae Jepsen-Calico-Smith. I’m not very important to the platoon. I’m new, you see, but all the other cats have gone to the Furball and Bucket and said I have to stay here. And Commander Torvalds has been on the line with special instructions.

    Basically, he’s closed the kernel window for RC1 of Linux 4.9 early. And the Colonel is asleep. I bet he’s going to make it my fault.

    The Commander said: "I usually do the releases on a Sunday afternoon, but occasionally cut the merge window short by a day just to keep people on their toes, and make sure people learn not to send in last-minute pull requests. No gaming the merge window to the last day. This is one such release.”

  • Kernel 4.9 merge window highlights

    The 4.8 kernel was released on October 2nd. This also marked the start of the merge window for the 4.9 kernel. The merge window is the time period when kernel subsystem maintainers send their pull requests for new features to be included in the 4.9 kernel. Here are a few features pulled into the 4.9 kernel that might be of interest for Fedora users.

  • Linux 4.9 Kernel Tacks On Over 200k Lines Of Code

    With all the new features in Linux 4.9, obviously Tux put on a bit of weight this kernel cycle... Here's some numbers.

    In yesterday's Linux 4.9 feature overview I failed to mention the latest code stats for this exciting kernel update that's introducing Greybus, boasts experimental GCN 1.0 AMDGPU support, supports 29 new ARM machines, and much more.

  • The Linux Foundation Moves to Unite the JavaScript Ecosystem

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Unity 8 Preview In Ubuntu 16.10

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Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak has just been released with quite a few number of new stuff and a first preview of Unity 8 desktop environment. Unity could be installed in Ubuntu 16.04 but it comes with 16.10 pre-installed. Unity 8 has been in development since 2013 and anyone who has seen or used Ubuntu phone will quickly notice the similarities and some major differences.

Read<br />

Parted Magic 2016_10_18 Disk Partitioning Live CD Released with over 800 Updates

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Today, October 18, 2016, Parted Magic LLC announced the release and general availability of a new, updated version of their once free Parted Magic disk partitioning Live CD.

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Wine and Games for GNU/Linux

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  • Wine-Staging Release 1.9.21

    The Wine Staging release 1.9.21 is now available.

  • Wine-Staging 1.9.21 Improves Its Vulkan Wrapper

    Re-basing to last week's Wine 1.9.21 release is a new version of Wine-Staging that incorporates various experimental/testing patches atop this code-base for running Windows binaries on Linux and other operating systems.

    Notable to Wine-Staging 1.9.21 are improvements around its experimental Vulkan wrapper, which allows for running Windows Vulkan programs that in turn rely upon host's native Vulkan driver. There is also a GIF encoder added to its Windows codecs implementation.

  • Feral have released the minimum and recommend system requirements for Mad Max on Linux

    The release of Mad Max [Steam, Feral Interactive] for Linux is fast approaching this week (20th!) and Feral have now updated their website with the minimum and recommended system specifications.

Raspberry Pi (2 and 3) support in Fedora 25 Beta!

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Red Hat

So support for the Raspberry Pi in Fedora has been a long time coming and yes, it’s FINALLY here with support landing just in time for Beta!

The most asked question I’ve had for a number of years is around support of the Raspberry Pi. It’s also something I’ve been working towards for a very long time on my own time. The eagle-eye watchers would have noticed we almost got there with Fedora 24, but I got pipped at the post because I felt it wasn’t quite good enough yet. There were too many minor issues around ease of use.

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i.MX6-based Mini-ITX SBC does triple displays

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Advantech launched one of the first ARM Mini-ITX SBCs. The RSB-6410 runs Linux or Android on an i.MX6, and has mini-PCIe, SATA, M.2, and triple displays.

Advantech calls the RSB-6410 the world’s first RISC-based Mini-ITX motherboard. Considering that all ARM Cortex-A SoCs are RISC SoCs, there have actually been a few others, but it’s still a rarity for this x86-oriented, 170 x 170mm form factor.

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Development News

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  • KDevelop 5.0.2 released and available for Download

    Kdevelop is an IDE,available on Linux and Windows,so it covers a good users' response or in other words,we should say,CODERS' response Tongue.
    Anyway,Today Few hours ago,Sven Brauch made an announcement regarding the release of the next maintenance update of the Kdevelop 5.X series.

  • GTK Scene Kit Merged For GTK4

    The GTK+ Scene Graph Kit (GSK) has landed in mainline GTK+ Git as the "spiritual successor to Clutter" and now providing a scene graph for this GNOME toolkit.

  • This Week in GTK+ – 20

    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 191 commits, with 4159 lines added and 64248 lines removed.

  • The Linux Foundation strives to unite open-source JavaScript community
  • The Linux Foundation Helps Launch the JS Foundation

    Today, the Linux Foundation announced the creation of a new entity named the JS Foundation that will serve as an umbrella project and guiding force for various open-source utilities at the heart of the JavaScript ecosystem.

    The JS Foundation's primary mission is to help manage and fund projects, but also cultivate best practices in the JavaScript ecosystem.

  • The Ops Identity Crisis

    A big theme in the keynotes and conversation during Velocity Conf in NYC a few weeks ago was the role of ops in an "ops-less" and "server-less" world. It's also been a big feature in discussions on twitter and in conversations I've had with coworkers and friends in the industry. There are several things that stand out to me in these conversations: first, that some ops engineers (sysadmins, techops, devops, and SREs) are worried that they will be phased out if developers and software engineers are responsible for the operational tasks in their systems; second, that developers and software engineers do not have the skills needed to take over responsibility for operational tasks; and third, that building reliable systems is impossible without an operations organization.

Linux Devices

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  • How to fly your DIY Raspberry Pi drone

    We've shown you how to build your own drone, and once you’d fitted all the cables and powered up, you have been able to enjoy your first flight. However, if you’ve found that your drone has a tendency to fly off in a random direction or doesn’t seem to respond in the way that you want then we’re now going to take a look at the delicate process of connection and calibration.

    The calibration of the drone will be carried out using software called APM which enables us to calibrate the RC unit with the PXFMini autopilot module.

  • Demonstrating the Future of IoT

    Yesterday was a special day. It would be a nightmare day for most tech executive. I was a keynote speaker for OpenIoT Europe / Embedded Linux Conference from The Linux Foundation and was asked to demo IoT in front of more than a thousand [potentially multiple thousands] experts. If there is one thing software companies don't do enough, it is sending their executives to demo their new products. I survived and it went quite well. This blog post will run through my demos but also explain how each is just a building block towards a software defined future in which home, business and industrial IoT will redefine our future. My code is on Github and where possible I will give instructions to do the demo yourself.

  • App: Smart Tutor Released by Samsung for Tizen Smartphones

    A new app named Smart Tutor has been released by Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. and is available right now from the Tizen Store. Using the app you are able to contact Samsung customer care about your device support needs. It’s an easy, quick and safe technical support application and a good consulting tool for Samsung smartphones. You can get help from Samsung Customer Care for solve your device’s technical issues. It can be used to diagnose your device remotely in order to optimize device performance and give functional advice.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux on Servers

  • The Point Of Docker Is More Than Containers
    Spending time with Docker during Cloud Field Day about a month ago opened my eyes to the larger ecosystem that Docker is building, and that others are building around it. There is so much more to Docker than just the idea of immutable containers. For a start, Docker made using containers easy. That’s no small feat for a tricky piece of technical infrastructure. Making it easy, and specifically easy for developers, to use removed a lot of friction that was no small contributor to the pain of other, earlier methods. It gave developers are really simple way to create a fully functional development environment, isolated from all other dependencies, with which to work.
  • What are the Top NFV Risks for Carriers?
    What are the risks of network functions virtualization (NFV)? As with any emerging technology, moving fast or picking the wrong components can do more harm than good. Let’s spend some time breaking down the NFV risks in building a virtual network. I have spent the few months gathering feedback from various service providers to get their view on whether NFV and its cousin software-defined networking (SDN) are ready for prime time. Even though many service providers expressed optimism that NFV technology is moving toward maturity, there are definitely cautionary tales on what to look out for. This article serves as an introduction to the challenges of NFV component selection – later articles will refer in more detail to the challenges in selecting NFV hardware and software components such as OpenStack and Open vSwitch.
  • “DevOps is a management problem”
    Improving your own organization’s performance – from where they are now to performance levels equal to the industry leaders – seems like a very long and difficult road. What is missing in most organizations? We talked to Damon Edwards, co-founder and managing partner of DTO Solutions and DevOpsCon speaker, about the challenges that accompany DevOps and how a repeatable system that empowers teams to find and fix their own problems looks like.
  • Manage disk image files wisely in the face of DevOps sprawl
    A disk image is simply a file, but that seemingly innocuous file contains a complete structure that represents applications, storage volumes and even entire disk drives.
  • TNS Guide to Serverless Technologies: The Best Frameworks, Platforms and Tools
    Even if you don’t need the servers themselves, serverless technologies could still require plenty of supporting software. Frameworks are needed to codify best practices, so that everyone is not out to reinvent the wheel, especially when it comes to interfacing with various languages such as Go, JavaScript and Python. And platforms are needed to help people avoid spending too much time on configuring the underlying infrastructure, perhaps by handing the work off to a service provider. Just in time for the Serverless conference in London, this post highlights some of the most widely used frameworks and platforms, as well as other supporting tools, that make successful serverless-based workloads happen.

today's leftovers

  • Why Is The Penguin Tux Official Mascot of Linux? Because Torvalds Had Penguinitis!
    The official mascot of the Linux kernel developed by Linus Torvalds is a penguin named Tux. You might have thought about the probable reasons why a penguin has been used as the face of the Linux kernel. Some people believe that Torvalds was bitten by a penguin that’s why he chose one to represent his kernel.
  • SafeEyes – An Useful Linux Utility That Prevents Eye Strain
    Working in Computer for long hours is pain, and it will definitely affect your eyes. You must take some breaks for your eyes at regular intervals. There are numerous utilities available out there to remind you to take breaks. The one we are going to discuss now is SafeEyes. It is a free and open Source Linux alternative for EyeLeo, a MS Windows-only app. As the name suggests, SafeEyes will protect you from Eye Strain by reminding or forcing you to take breaks after a particular period of time. During the break, it will suggest you some simple exercises like walking for a while, rolling your eyes etc., to relax yourself. If you are a hardcore user who work on computers for long hours, I recommended you to use SafeEyes in your system.
  • Awwh, This Linux Wallpaper Is Adorable
    I pimped some Fedora community wallpapers yesterday, there was that (rather gorgeous) Ubuntu Timeline wallpaper a few weeks back, and the steam from hype-train that brought the “new” Ubuntu default wallpaper still lingers in the air a bit. So — honestly — I wanted so bad not to write about yet another wallpaper.
  • IBM DB2 database gets ‘significant advances’ across Windows, Linux and z/ OSs
    IBM put ‘significant advances’ into its database software DB2, helping companies lower their operating costs while bringing together transactions and analytics in the same database to increase the speed of real-time data analysis. The new DB2 will incorporate hybrid transactional analytical processing (HTAP) available for Linux, Unix, Windows, and z/OS in December
  • Spotify for Linux – In the friendzone
    Spotify is arguably the most popular music streaming service out there. Apologies to any diehard fanboys who may have been offended by this statement. With 100 million users and tight social media integration, it sure plays in the big league. You can also go premium and this will render your interface ad-free and fidelity-high. But what about Linux? As it turns out, Linux has never been high on the list of priorities for the Spotify team, and at some point, the support was discontinued, then it was revived recently, which prompted me to give it a try. Seeking originality and uniqueness in my work, I opted for Fedora, only to learn that only builds for Debian-based distributions are available. In other words, Ubuntu and friends. Very similar to my experience with Sayonara. Anyhow, let’s see what gives.
  • Benefits Of Using Lightweight Linux Distributions
    There are quite a few lightweight linux distributions around but why should you care especially when most of our PCs that are on the market boast some very fast multi-core processors, large volumes of RAM and very fast Solid State Drives. Sure they can bring new life to old machines but there are many other reasons why they could be awesome for you.Let me give you a few reasons you would so much benefit from going with a Lightweight Linux distribution.
  • Alpine Linux 3.4.5 Released with Linux Kernel 4.4.27 LTS, Latest Security Fixes
    A new maintenance update of the server-oriented Alpine Linux 3.4 operating system has been released, bringing a new Linux kernel version from the long-term supported 4.4 series and the latest security patches. According to the release notes, Alpine Linux 3.4.5 is now available as the most up-to-date version of the GNU/Linux distribution based on musl libc and BusyBox, it's powered by the Linux 4.4.27 LTS kernel, which was fully patched against the "Dirty COW" vulnerability, and includes numerous updated components and applications.
  • Upgrade OpenSUSE Leap to OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Rolling Release
  • ArchBang – Best Arch based distro for old or low-end hardware with high performance and low resource utilization
    Arch Linux is very unique, compare with other Linux distributions because it doesn’t comes with live ISO & Desktop Environment. Arch gives you the full freedom to customize the installation as you wish, When you boot up, you’ll be end up with a terminal and most of the people panic here because they don’t want to build from scratch. There are many, Actively developed Arch derived Linux distributions are available with pre-installed Desktop environment. I would advise you to go with any one distribution as you wish.
  • Red Hat Stock Sees Short Interest Make 21% Move
  • New Video Shows Changes Headed to Unity 8
    A new YouTube video claims to show an ‘quick overview of what’s to come to Unity 8’ in a future update. Uploaded by Kugi Javacookies (not sure if that’s his real name), the clip is described as offering a “quick overview of what’s to come soon to Unity 8. Since the silo has now been signed-off by QA, so it will probably land really soon.” Kugi adds that he finds it “awesome to actually follow projects even up to the small details. Codes in launchpad, actual projects in bileto and queued silos for QA testing in Trello. Really cool! :D”.
  • [Bodhi Linux] Modules and Themes in 4.0.0 Repos
    We will be stamping the 4.0.0 release as stable fairly soon and one the last pieces of that puzzle is getting all the “extras” for moksha into the repos. Users can now find the following modules and themes in the Bodhi 4.0.0 main repository for usage / testing:
  • Congatec’s first Apollo Lake COMs include SMARC 2.0 model
    Congatec announced three Linux-friendly COMs based on Intel’s new Atom E3900 SoC: a Qseven, a COM Express Compact, and one of the first SMARC 2.0 modules. Congatec is one of the first vendors to announce a major product lineup based on Intel’s newly announced, 14nm-fabricated Atom E3900 “Apollo Lake” SoCs. In addition to the Qseven form-factor Conga-QA5 and the COM Express Compact Type 6 CongaTCA5 modules, the company unveiled the Conga-SA5, which is billed as Congatec’s first SMARC 2.0 module. In fact, the Conga-SA5 appears to be the company’s first SMARC COM ever, and one of the first SMARC 2.0 models to be fully announced. (See more on SMARC 2.0 below.)
  • Intel launches 14nm Atom E3900 and spins an automotive version
    The Linux-ready Atom E3900 series, which was formally announced at the IoT Solutions World Congress in Barcelona on the same day as the start of ARM TechCon in Silicon Valley, has already started rolling out to some 30 OEM customers, some of which have already announced products (see below). The first Apollo Lake based products will ship 2Q 2017, says Intel.

today's howtos

DevOps Handbook and Course