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Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed.

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Android and Tizen Leftovers

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Android
Linux
  • Video: The Future of Samsung Tizen TV, a new user interface for your changing moods

    It’s our vision that helps us shape what tomorrow’s technology will look like. Samsung Design America are no strangers to the idea of vision and want to conceptualise the future of television or in our case Tizen television.

    Samsung wanted to realise how their products could adapt to this new world in which you are able to play any of the world’s media content, which is available anytime, anywhere on any given device.

  • Smartphone App: Indian Rail IRCTC PNR Status available in Tizen Store
  • NuAns is back with Neo Reloaded, but it's Android-powered

    Back in 2015, Japanese company NuAns showed off its Windows 10-powered Neo smartphone for the first time. It's selling point was the TWOTONE interchangeable covers for its back. The phone debuted at CES 2016, post which the company announced its plans for the device's global launch through a Kickstarter campaign.

  • New LG G6 photos surface
  • OnePlus 3 and 3T get Nougat-based Hydrogen OS 3.0 update
  • What devices are Android Authority readers using?
  • The Facts-Based Survey of Mobile Money Globally Focusing on the Reality and Numbers - Ignores totally the utterly trivial noise of Apple Pay, Bitcoins and Paypal

    World has 2.5 Billion active users of mobile payments already in 2016. That is more than the total active user base of Facebook. The value of mobile payment transactions last year was worth $600 Billion dollars. Easily ten times bigger than the total combined value of all app stores, iOS, Google Play and others, put together. Just in tickets sold onto mobile alone, the world saw 11.5 Billion mobile tickets delivered last year. The bulk of those were on busses, trains and airplanes, not movies, rock concerts and lottery tickets. Mobile coupons are worth $30 Billion dollars all by that category alone. All this is discussed in today's blog article. This article sets in proper relationship the various technologies that you probably have heard of about mobile payments such as mobile internet based services like Paypal, NFC based payments like Apple Pay, Starbucks style mobile wallets, M-Pesa style SMS payments, Bitcoins, but also QR codes, USSD, MMS and WAP Billing. This article offers the most thorough treatment of mobile payments in the public domain currently, and it focuses on where the money is. 54% of all mobile payments processed last year went through..... SMS. There are tons of case examples and statistics from all around the world: Australia, China, Finland, India, Japan, Kenya, Malaysia, Norway, Philippines, South Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, UK and USA. There are major corporations and brands discussed who do remarkable things with mobile payments today like Air Asia, Castrol, Coca Cola, Finnair, Lifebuoy, Nordstrom, Rihanna and Tally Weijl.

5 Best Linux Password Managers

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Linux

How do you keep track of ton of user accounts and passwords in this online age. I hope you do not use one password for all your online accounts as that is not safe. You need to come up with the unique and secure passwords for all your online services and accounts. So how do you manage or keep track of these passwords. In your memory? Come on! I recommend you use a password manager.

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New Releases: Manjaro XFCE, Vine Linux, IPFire

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GNU
Linux
  • Manjaro XFCE 17.0-rc1 released

    Manjaro Fringilla was a great release! Now we are proud to announce our first release candidate of our next release, we call “Gellivara”. It took us more than two month to prepare this new release series for 2017.

  • Vine Linux 6.5 beta8 (final)
  • IPFire 2.19 Core Update 109 Hits Stable with Python 3 Support and OpenSSL 1.0.2k

    After being in development for the past two weeks, IPFire 2.19 Core Update 109 has today hit the stable channel and it's a recommended upgrade for all those who use the IPFire 2.19 series of the open-source, Linux-based firewall distro.

    As noted in our previous report, the most important feature of IPFire 2.19 Core Update 109 is the inclusion of the unbound 1.6.0 recursive and caching DNS resolver in the distro's built-in DNS proxy to address some important bugs, re-activate QNAME minimisation and hardening below NX domains, and implement the ability for the firewall to check if a router loses longer DNS responses.

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Ten Features You Will Not Find In The Mainline Linux 4.10 Kernel

    With last weekend mentioning ten exciting features of Linux 4.10, the tables have turned and now we are looking at ten features not found in the mainline our complete Linux 4.10 feature overview for all of the great stuff shipping in this kernel that should be out on Sunday. You may consider this article now as a bit of satire with some of these features weren't expected to appear in Linux 4.10 in the first place, but I am just mentioning several things that aren't in Linux 4.10 but some users would have found nice if they in fact happened.

  • SystemTap 3.1 has been released

    The SystemTap team has announced the 3.1 release of the tool that allows extracting performance and debugging information at runtime from the kernel as well as various user-space programs. New features include support for adding probes to Python 2 and 3 functions, Java probes now convert all parameters to strings before passing them to probes, a new @variance() statistical operator has been added, new sample scripts have been added, and more.

  • The X.Org Foundation Is Preparing For Their 2017 Elections

    This year's X.Org Foundation elections are warming up and will be getting underway shortly.

Linus The Man Behind Linux

Filed under
Linux

Well, we all have heard somewhere (if not using it already) about Linux an Operating System that hardly gets a virus, that runs applications created to run only on Linux and can’t run Windows and MacOS applications (at least not out of the box), and it's free, as in free beer or as in speech. But how was Linux created? Why is it free? Who created it?

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Top 6 best Linux terminal emulators of 2017

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Linux

The terminal is the beating heart of Linux, no matter how hard today’s user-friendly graphical distros might try to push it into the background. If you need something done quickly and efficiently, chances are the best way to do it is with some complex keyboard wrangling. Exactly what to type is beyond the scope of this article – check out our guide here to get yourself started.

The key, if you’re a terminal-slinging Linux badass, is making sure you type those commands with as much style and panache as possible. And while you’ll likely never be in a position where you’re not able to drop to a straight full-screen shell, having a quick window to the command line on your desktop is always handy.

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Linux/OSS Devices

Filed under
Linux
  • Commoditising 5G and IoT base stations through open-source

    Following up their successful $1million crowdfunding campaign for an open-source, 5G and IoT capable Software-Defined Radio (LimeSDR), Lime Microsystems and Canonical announced a second round of crowdfunding for SDR-based LimeNET.

    Described as a high capacity network in a box for mobile and IoT applications, the compact unit is based on an Intel i7 processor and the open source LimeSDR PCIe card.

  • Pico-ITX SBC taps quad- or dual-core Intel Apollo Lake

    Axiomtek’s “PICO312” Pico-ITX SBC offers Intel “Apollo Lake” SoCs and up to 8GB RAM, dual-display support, plus GbE, USB, SATA, and mini-PCIe expansion.

  • GPD Pocket “7-inch” Windows 10, Ubuntu “ laptop now available on Indiegogo at $399

    GPD, a Hong Kong-based portable gaming company, that has produced a number of handheld Android-based gaming devices, is running a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo to fund a device known as the ‘GPD Pocket’. Crowdfunding for the GPD Pocket has already reached past its $200,000 fixed funding goal.

Linux and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • Happy Birthday, Hyperledger!

    Last February, The Linux Foundation announced 30 founding members and six of those proposed contributions of code to advance blockchain technology under Hyperledger. Fast forward to today, Hyperledger is now the fastest growing project ever hosted by The Linux Foundation. More than 110 member companies that span numerous industries make up the project and support five incubated open source projects. Hyperledger membership is truly global with 39% in APAC (25% in China), 20% in EMEA and 41% spread across North America. Below is an overview highlighting the important achievements in Hyperledger’s first year.

  • Hyperledger Blockchain Turns One – Director Brian Behlendorf Updates

    Today is the first day of the invite-only Lake Tahoe based Linux Foundation’s Open Source Leadership Summit, where Executive Director, Brian Behlendorf is to give an update to the community on Hyperledger, the largest open source private Blockchain currently being managed by the Linux team.

  • How The Linux Foundation is Advancing Next-Gen Internet Infrastructure

    The breadth of the The Linux Foundation (affectionately known as The LF) is often overlooked due to its eponymous name. However, what may not be apparent to the layman is that The LF is providing a true foundation for the next generation of Internet infrastructure by cultivating the biggest shared technology investment in history. The LF is so much more than Linux. Our work encompasses projects from security and IoT, to networking and cloud computing, and beyond.

Linus Torvalds at Open Source Leadership Summit

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Linux
  • Video: Linus Torvalds on How to Build a Successful Open Source Project

    Linux creator Linus Torvalds took the stage at Open Source Leadership Summit this week to share some of his secrets to success in building one of the world’s largest and most successful open source projects.

    After 25 years of development, the Linux kernel last year reached more than 22 million lines of code with more than 5,000 developers from about 500 companies contributing, according to the 2016 Linux Kernel Development Report.

  • Tech industry innovation is bullshit

    Open sauce's Mr Sweary Linus Torvalds has waded into tech companies who keep banging on about innovation.

    Swearing at the Open Source Leadership Summit, Torvalds said he really hates the technology industry's celebration of innovation. He thinks it is smug, self-congratulatory, and self-serving.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Releases

  • The Changes So Far For The Linux 4.11 Kernel
    We are now through week one of two for the Linux 4.11 kernel merge window. I've already written a number of news posts this past week covering features I find interesting for Linux 4.11. If you are short on time and behind in your Phoronix reading, here's a quick overview of the material so far for this next major kernel bump.
  • Container-friendly Alpine Linux may get Java port
    A proposal floated this week on an OpenJDK mailing list calls for porting the JDK (Java Development Kit), including the Java Runtime Environment, Java compiler and APIs, to both the distribution and the musl C standard library, which is supported by Alpine Linux. The key focus here is musl; Java has previously been ported to the standard glibc library, which you can install in Alpine, but the standard Alpine release switched two years ago to musl because it’s much faster and more compact.
  • Linux From Scratch 8.0 Released, Brings New Changes And Features

today's howtos

Jolla inks exclusive license to kick-start its Android alternative in China

Mobile OS maker Jolla, whose Sailfish platform remains one of the few smartphone alternatives in play these days, has signed an exclusive license to a Chinese consortium to develop a Sailfish-based OS for the country. Jolla says the Chinese consortium will be aiming to invest $250M in developing a Sailfish ecosystem for the country, though it’s not specifying exactly is backing the consortia at this point, nor over what timeframe the investment will happen — beyond saying one of its early investors, a local private equity investor Shan Li, will take a “leading role” in building it up. “There are very big players behind it,” Jolla chairman Antti Saarnio tells TechCrunch, speaking ahead of a press conference held to announce the news here at the Mobile World Congress tradeshow in Barcelona. Read more

Khronos and Vulkan