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BPFILTER, Net Failover Driver & Other Network Changes For Linux 4.18

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Linux

David Miller has submitted the big platter of networking updates for the in-development Linux 4.18 kernel.

Arguably the most notable networking addition for Linux 4.18 is the new BPFILTER infrastructure that will eventually be used to replace existing firewall and packet filtering implementations within the kernel. The new BPFILTER-based solution should allow better security, easier maintenance, and potential performance wins via BPF JIT and hardware offloading. But for Linux 4.18 is just the initial framework and the user-mode helpers.

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Sandwich-style hacker board debuts new quad -A7 Rockchip SoC

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Android
Linux
Ubuntu

Firefly’s Core-PX3-SEJ COM runs Ubuntu or Android on a new quad -A7 Rockchip PX3-SE SoC. The module is available as part of a $120 Firefly-PX3-SE dev board with -20 to 80℃ support.

Firefly’s SODIMM-style, 67.6 x 40mm Core-PX3-SEJ module runs Android 5.1 or Ubuntu 15.04 on a Rockchip PX3-SE (translated), a new 1.3GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A7 SoC. The $40 module is available in a 1GB RAM/8GB eMMC configuration on a $120, 117 x 85mm Firefly-PX3-SE development board. Other memory configurations may also be available (see spec list below).

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Stable kernels 4.9.107 and 4.4.136

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Linux

Linux 4.18 FUSE, Year Bug, and Sound

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Linux
  • FUSE Gets User Namespace Support With Linux 4.18

    The FUSE updates have been sent in for allowing file-systems in user-space, what Linus Torvalds previously referred to as being for toys and misguided people.

    With FUSE for Linux 4.18 it adds a new feature: user name-space support to allow for safe unprivileged FUSE mounts within a user name-space.

  • Linux 4.18 Continues Prepping For The Year 2038

    The Linux kernel has already been prepping for years for Year 2038 and that work is still ongoing with the in-development Linux 4.18 kernel.

    For those unfamiliar with the Year 2038 problem, that is when systems using a signed 32-bit integer for storing the time since 1 January 1970, as is standard for the Unix time-stamp, will wrap around. That obviously will cause many systems to be confused. The Linux kernel across its around 20 million lines of code has been working to address the "Y2038" problem but it's no easy task with the around twenty million lines of code to the Linux kernel.

  • Plenty Of Sound Changes To Be Heard With Linux 4.18

    Adding to the growing list of kernel changes for Linux 4.18 are a great deal of sound driver/subsystem updates.

8 MacOS Like Docks for Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac
Ubuntu

You might not be running macOS but you’re a GNU/Linux user so you have the option to switch your style up and make your app launcher similar to the dock on macOS.

The dock apps here are top-class so don’t blame me if you have a tough time picking one of them. On the plus side, you can use them all!

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Also: FAI 5.7

Sailfish OS 2.2.0 is now available for Jolla devices & Sailfish X

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OS
Linux

One of the biggest and most feature packed Sailfish OS updates is now available through early access on Jolla devices and Sailfish X! This update’s name is Mouhijoki, which is a river in Finland with roots from the lake Mouhijärvi. Mouhijoki is only 11,5 km long. It runs through farming field sceneries, with occasional cottages and saunas in Pirkanmaa area close to the city of Tampere.

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Kernel Space: Stratis, Linux 4.18 and Peter Huttere on Trackpoint Devices

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Linux
  • Stratis: Easy local storage management for Linux

    Stratis is a new local storage-management solution for Linux. It can be compared to ZFS, Btrfs, or LVM. Its focus is on simplicity of concepts and ease of use, while giving users access to advanced storage features. Internally, Stratis's implementation favors tight integration of existing components instead of the fully-integrated, in-kernel approach that ZFS and Btrfs use. This has benefits and drawbacks for Stratis, but also greatly decreases the overall time needed to develop a useful and stable initial version, which can then be a base for further improvement in later versions. As the Stratis team lead at Red Hat, I am hoping to raise the profile of the project a bit so that more in our community will have it as an option.

  • Unprivileged filesystem mounts, 2018 edition

    The advent of user namespaces and container technology has made it possible to extend more root-like powers to unprivileged users in a (we hope) safe way. One remaining sticking point is the mounting of filesystems, which has long been fraught with security problems. Work has been proceeding to allow such mounts for years, and it has gotten a little closer with the posting of a patch series intended for the 4.18 kernel. But, as an unrelated discussion has made clear, truly safe unprivileged filesystem mounting is still a rather distant prospect — at least, if one wants to do it in the kernel.

    Attempts to make the mount operation safe for ordinary users are nothing new; LWN covered one patch set back in 2008. That work was never merged, but the effort to allow unprivileged mounts picked up in 2015, when Eric Biederman (along with others, Seth Forshee in particular) got serious about allowing user namespaces to perform filesystem mounts. The initial work was merged in 2016 for the 4.8 kernel, but it was known to not be a complete solution to the problem, so most filesystems can still only be mounted by users who are privileged in the initial namespace.

  • Bpfilter (and user-mode blobs) for 4.18

    In February, the bpfilter mechanism was first posted to the mailing lists. Bpfilter is meant to be a replacement for the current in-kernel firewall/packet-filtering code. It provides little functionality itself; instead, it creates a set of hooks that can run BPF programs to make the packet-filtering decisions. A version of that patch set has been merged into the net-next tree for 4.18. It will not be replacing any existing packet filters in its current form, but it does feature a significant change to one of its more controversial features: the new user-mode helper mechanism.

    The core motivation behind bpfilter is performance. An in-kernel, general-purpose packet filter must necessarily offer a wide range of features; any given site will probably only use a small subset of those features. The result is a lot of unused code and time spent checking for whether a given feature is in use, slowing the whole thing down. A packet-filtering configuration expressed as a BPF program, instead, contains only the code needed to implement the desired policy. Once that code is translated to native code by the just-in-time compiler, it should be both compact and fast. The networking developers hope that it will be fast enough to win back some of the users who have moved to proprietary user-space filtering implementations.

    If bpfilter is to replace netfilter, though, it must provide ABI compatibility so that existing configurations continue to work. To that end, the bpfilter developers intend to implement the current netfilter configuration protocol; bpfilter will accept iptables rules and compile them to BPF transparently. That compilation is not a trivial task, though, and one that could present some security challenges, so the desire is to do it in user space, but under kernel control.

  • Observations on trackpoint input data

    This time we talk trackpoints. Or pointing sticks, or whatever else you want to call that thing between the GHB keys. If you don't have one and you've never seen one, prepare to be amazed. [1]

    Trackpoints are tiny joysticks that react to pressure [2], convert that pressure into relative x/y events and pass that on to whoever is interested in it. The harder you push, the higher the deltas. This is where the simple and obvious stops and it gets difficult. But then again, if it was that easy I wouldn't write this post, you wouldn't have anything to read, so somehow everyone wins. Whoop-dee-doo.

  • Hutterer: Observations on trackpoint input data

    Peter Hutterer writes about the behavior of trackpoint devices in great detail.

3 journaling applications for the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Keeping a journal, even irregularly, can have many benefits. It's not only therapeutic and cathartic, it's also a good record of where you are and where you've been. It can help show your progress in life and remind you of what you've done right and what you've done wrong.

No matter what your reasons are for keeping a journal or a diary, there are a variety of ways in which to do that. You could go old school and use pen and paper. You could use a web-based application. Or you could turn to the humble text file.

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Buildah 1.0: Linux Container construction made easy

Filed under
Linux
Server

The good news about containers, such as Docker's, is they make it easy to deploy applications, and you can run far more of them on a server than you can on a virtual machine. The bad news is that putting an application into a container can be difficult. That's where Buildah comes in.

Buildah is a newly released shell program for efficiently and quickly building Open Container Initiative (OCI) and Docker compliant images and containers. Buildah simplifies the process of creating, building, and updating images while decreasing the learning curve of the container environment.

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Linux Foundation: Git Courses and Automotive Grade Linux

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Linux
  • Want To Learn Open Source Development, Git, and Linux? The Linux Foundation is Offering a New Course for Developers

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the availability of LFD201 - Introduction to Open Source Development, Git, and Linux, a training course focused on open source software, an introduction to Linux systems and the use of Git, the revision control system.

  • Airbiquity Joins Automotive Grade Linux

    A primary goal of AGL is to help automakers and suppliers reuse software application code, leading to rapid innovation and faster time-to-market for new products and features. AGL is working to address all software in the vehicle including functional safety, infotainment, instrument cluster, heads-up-display (HUD), advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), and autonomous driving. As an AGL member, Airbiquity will focus its initial participation in the over-the-air (OTA) software update and telematics security areas.

  • Automotive Grade Linux Welcomes Seven New Members

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for the connected car, is announcing that seven new members have joined the project including Abalta Technologies, Airbiquity, Bose, EPAM Systems, HERE, Integrated Computer Solutions and Sitech Electric Automotive. Support and interest in AGL continues to grow as the project surpasses 120 members.

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Kubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver upgrades - Results!

A month later, two upgrades later, Kubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver is a nicer distribution than what I tested shortly after its official release. But then, it's not perfect. The older box with the Nvidia card returned better results overall, although there were some niggles. On the multi-boot laptop, I wasn't too happy with the slow-boot issue, although this is NOT a Kubuntu-specific problem, as you will learn in a few days. But it still does not give me the razor-sharp confidence I need and expect from an LTS. In general, Ubuntu-family upgrades are reasonably robust, but they can still be more streamlined, including package removal, third-party repos and odd glitches here and there. I wonder how I'd have felt if I tested Beaver fresh, right now. Alas, I cannot delete the memory of my first encounter. With Trusty, it was just right. Here, it might be right, and I may even end up using - and loving - Plasma Bionic in my prod setup, but it will never be the amazing chemistry I had with 14.04. But if you're wondering, by all means, worth testing and upgrading, and the post-release Kubuntu Beaver is a pretty slick and tight distro. If I had to judge in isolation, i.e. no early-May scars, then when I combine performance, looks, fonts, media, hardware support, and such, 'tis really neat. Something like 9/10. Now, just waiting for the Men In Black mind-zapping eraser thingie, so I can be blissfully happy. And we're done. Read more

Unixstickers

Unixstickers

Awesome products, will definitely get another bunch of some more stickers soon :-)