Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

Amazon Linux 2 - Who nicked my cheese?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

So far, it's a relatively benign, easy introduction to a new operating system that blends the familiar and new in a timid package. Perhaps that's the goal, because a radical offering would right away scare everyone. Amazon Linux 2 is an appealing concept, as it gives users what Red Hat never quite did (yet) - A Fedora-like bleeding-edge tech with the stability and long-term support of the mainstay enterprise offering. But then, it also pulls a Debian/Ubuntu stunt by breaking ABI, so it will be cubicle to those who enjoying living la vida loco (in their cubicle or open-space prison).

Having lived and breathed the large-scale HPC world for many years, I am quite piqued to see how this will evolve. Performance, stability and ease of use will be my primary concerns. Then, is it possible to hook up a remote virtual machine into the EC2 hive? That's another experiment, and I'd like to see if scaling and deployment works well over distributed networks. Either way, even if nothing comes out of it, Amazon Linux 2 is a nice start to a possibly great adventure. Or yet another offspring in the fragmented family we call Linux. Time will tell. Off you go. Cloud away.

Read more

Linux: To recurse or not

Filed under
Linux

Linux and recursion are on very good speaking terms. In fact, a number of Linux command recurse without ever being asked while others have to be coaxed with just the right option. When is recursion most helpful and how can you use it to make your tasks easier? Let’s run through some useful examples and see.

Read more

diff -u: Automated Bug Reporting

Filed under
Linux

A variety of automated bug-hunters are roaming around reporting bugs. One of them is Syzbot, an open-source tool specifically designed to find bugs in Linux and report them. Dmitry Vyukov recently sent in a hand-crafted email asking for help from the community to make Syzbot even more effective.

The main problems were how to track bugs after Syzbot had reported them and how to tell when a patch went into the kernel to address a given bug.

It turned out that Andrey Ryabinin and Linus Torvalds got together to collaborate on an easy solution for Dmitry's problem: Syzbot should include a unique identifier in its own email address. The idea is that anything after a "+" in an email address is completely ignored. So zbrown@gmail.com is exactly the same as zbrown+stoptrump@gmail.com. Andrey and Linus suggested that Syzbot use this technique to include a hash value associated with each bug report. Then, Linux developers would include that email address in the "Reported-By" portion of their patch submissions as part of the normal developer process.

Read more

Linux Weather Forecast

Filed under
Linux

This page is an attempt to track ongoing developments in the Linux development community that have a good chance of appearing in a mainline kernel and/or major distributions sometime in the near future. Your "chief meteorologist" is Jonathan Corbet, Executive Editor at LWN.net. If you have suggestions on improving the forecast (and particularly if you have a project or patchset that you think should be tracked), please add your comments below.

Read more

Real-time Linux based automation controller supports up to 16 I/O modules

Filed under
Linux

Opto 22 announced its first Linux-based automation controller: a rugged “Groov EPIC” system that runs real-time Linux on a quad-core ARM SoC, and supports process and machine control, SCADA/RTU, and industrial IoT edge gateway applications.

Increasingly, industrial equipment manufacturers must not only compete on features, but also meet their clients’ need to attract the best developers. That often means shifting from proprietary RTOS or Windows based solutions to Linux. The latest to make the switch is Opto 22, whose announcement suggests the Groov EPIC controller represents a major new product direction compared to its previous Groov products.

Read more

Devices/Embedded: Nintendo Switch, Advantech, Renesa, PocketBeagle

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Samsung Launch ‘Linux on Galaxy’ Survey

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

Samsung has launched a survey to find out what users want and expect from the Linux on Galaxy idea.

The ‘Linux on Galaxy’ project allows a regular desktop Linux distro to run on select Samsung smartphones by sharing the same Linux kernel used in Android.

Users can then connect their smartphone to a Samsung DeX dock to convert their Samsung smartphone in to a normal desktop PC with an external monitor, bluetooth keyboard, mouse and so on.

Read more

Q4OS Makes Linux Easy for Everyone

Filed under
OS
Linux

Modern Linux distributions tend to target a variety of users. Some claim to offer a flavor of the open source platform that anyone can use. And, I’ve seen some such claims succeed with aplomb, while others fall flat. Q4OS is one of those odd distributions that doesn’t bother to make such a claim but pulls off the feat anyway.

So, who is the primary market for Q4OS? According to its website, the distribution is a:

“fast and powerful operating system based on the latest technologies while offering highly productive desktop environment. We focus on security, reliability, long-term stability and conservative integration of verified new features. System is distinguished by speed and very low hardware requirements, runs great on brand new machines as well as legacy computers. It is also very applicable for virtualization and cloud computing.”

Read more

Linux Foundation: CNCF, Linux Foundation Networking Fund (LFN), Open FinTech Forum (OFTF)

Filed under
Linux
  • The CNCF takes steps toward serverless computing

    Even though the idea of ‘serverless’ has been around since 2006, it is a relatively new concept. It’s the next step in the ongoing revolution of IT infrastructure that goes back to the days when one server used to run one application.

  • Spirent joins Linux Foundation Networking Fund (LFN) to support new Open Source ecosystem

    Spirent Communications joined the Linux Foundation Networking Fund (LFN), an umbrella group created by The Linux Foundation for its various networking initiatives. Spirent said it's the first test product vendor to support the development of a new Open Source ecosystem for telecom service assurance. Open Networking Automation Platform (ONAP), Open Platform for NFV and OpenDaylight gained widespread endorsement in 2017 from service providers, as de facto industry standards.

  • Linux Foundation launches OFTF event to include blockchain

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit focused on open source innovation, has announced a new event with a cumbersome name: “Open FinTech Forum: AI, Blockchain, Kubernetes & Quantum on Wall Street” (aka OFTF). It will take place on October 10-11, 2018 in New York City.

Raspberry Pi Projects: Things Gateway by Mozilla, Bang and Olufsen and HiFiBerry

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Syndicate content