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Linux

Debian 9 Complete Screenshot Tour

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Linux

The world’s most stable upstream Linux distro has just announced a point upgrade on its latest Debian 9 Stretch release. The latest version is 9.3, it comes with many corrections and improvements on the security front as well as some adjustments to cater for some other serious issues. The point release is not a new version of Debian 9 but only updates are added, so users do not need to throw away the old installation media as users can easily upgrade to an up-to-date system using an updated mirror.

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Hackable USB dongle offers multiple sensors including PIR motion detection

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Linux
Hardware

Gumstix’s Arduino-driven “RoomSense” board offers an ATSAMW25 MCU, WiFi, passive-IR motion detection, plus temperature, humidity, and barometric sensors.

The Gumstix RoomSense is a USB dongle board that can detect room occupancy using passive infrared (PIR) technology and report on temperature, humidity, and barometric conditions. The board can be customized in the Gumstix Geppetto online development service, which was used to design it in the first place. Geppetto users can “customize specifications online by changing processors or adding GPS and sensors as needed,” says Gumstix.

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Also: AltOS 1.8.3 — TeleMega version 3.0 support and bug fixes

Linux Foundation: Juniper/OpenContrail and Bell Canada at Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP)

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Linux
  • Juniper Expands Contrail, Moves Open-Source Project to the Linux Foundation

    "Fortunately at Juniper we have a secrect weapon and one that i'm so very proud of and that's Contrail," Rami Rahim, Juniper Networks CEO said during his keynote. "The way we have been investing and innovating in Contrail over the last few years is sort of similar to how a car company would invest in a Formula 1 car, it's essentially a proving ground for the world's best technology."

    Rahim commented that the use-cases for Contrail so far have been somewhat limited, but that's about to change.

    "The future of Contrail is as a platform, a single controller that can solve a variety of really compelling use-cases with ease and simplicity," Rahim said. "Whether it's management of overlay and underlay, or SD-WAN connectivity, or multi-cloud fabric management."

    Juniper originally acquired Contrail in December 2012 in a deal valued at $176 million. In September 2013, Juniper open-sourcedthe Contrail technology, creating the OpenContrail project.

  • Juniper Networks' OpenContrail software defined network joins The Linux Foundation

    The Linux Foundation is far more than just Linux. It's also the home of many open-source networking projects such as the software-defined network (SDN) OpenDaylight, Open Platform for Network Function Virtualization (OPNFV), and Open Network Automation Program (ONAP). Now, networking power Juniper Networks has announced that OpenContrail, its open-source network virtualization cloud platform, will join the others as part of The Linux Foundation.

  • Juniper Moves OpenContrail to the Linux Foundation

    Juniper first released its Contrail products as open source in 2013 and built a community around the project. However, many stakeholders complained that Juniper didn’t work very hard to build the community, and some called it “faux-pen source.”

  • Juniper Moves SDN-Based OpenContrail Project to The Linux Foundation

    Juniper Networks today announced the codebase for OpenContrail, its open source network virtualization platform for the cloud, is moving to The Linux Foundation.

  • Bell Canada says open source ONAP adds modularity, flexibility to its network

    Bell Canada has become one of the first service providers to deploy Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), focusing its initial attention on automating its data center tenant network provisioning process.

    By making this transition in its network, the service provider said it will provide its operations teams with a new tool to improve efficiency and time to market.

    This is the first step in using ONAP as a common platform across Bell’s networks on its journey towards a multipartner DevOps model.

  • Bell Canada First to Deploy Open Source ONAP in Production

    Canadian communications provider Bell is the first organization to deploy an open source version of the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) in a production environment.

    The milestone was noted in a blog post by Arpit Joshipura, general manager of networking and orchestration with the Linux Foundation.

Getting started with the Notepadqq Linux text editor

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Linux

I don't do Windows. The operating system, I mean. At least, not on my own computers and not with any of my own work.

When I was a consultant, I often had to work out of my clients' offices, which meant using their hardware, which also meant using Windows at many of those offices.

Even when using Windows, I tried to install as much open source software as I could. Why? Because it works as well as (if not better than) its proprietary equivalents. One of the applications I always installed was Notepad++, which Opensource.com community moderator Ruth Holloway looked at in 2016.

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Linux Foundation News

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Linux
  • Juniper Networks Reinforces Longstanding Commitment to Open Source by Moving OpenContrail's Codebase to the Linux Foundation

    Juniper Networks (NYSE: JNPR), an industry leader in automated, scalable and secure networks, today further bolstered its support for open standards during its annual NXTWORK user conference, by announcing its intent to move the codebase for OpenContrail™, an open-source network virtualization platform for the cloud, to the Linux Foundation. Juniper first released its Juniper® Contrail® products as open sourced in 2013 and built a vibrant user and developer community around this project. Earlier this year, Juniper expanded the project's governance, creating an even more open, community-led effort to strengthen the project for its next growth phase. Adding OpenContrail's codebase to the Linux Foundation's networking projects will further its objective to grow the use of open source platforms in cloud ecosystems.

  • Hyperledger Hub Supports Open Source Blockchain Development

    Hyperledger is a global blockchain collaboration hub created and hosted by nonprofit The Linux Foundation. Its members are leaders in finance, banking, the Internet of Things, supply chains, manufacturing and technology.

    Now two years in, Hyperledger compares closely to the Ethereum Enterprise Alliance.

    Hyperledger is a hub for communities of software developers building blockchain frameworks and platforms. These developers, on the other hand, are a mix of individuals and teams from organizations around the world.

  • Linux Foundation Continues to Emphasize Diversity and Inclusiveness at Events

    This has been a pivotal year for Linux Foundation events. Our largest gatherings, which include Open Source Summit, Embedded Linux Conference, KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, Open Networking Summit, and Cloud Foundry Summit, attracted a combined 25,000 people from 4,500 different organizations globally. Attendance was up 25 percent over 2016.

    Linux Foundation events are often the only time that developers, maintainers, and other pros who contribute to Linux and other critical open source projects — like AGL, Kubernetes and Hyperledger to name a few — get together in person. Face-to-face meetings are crucial because they speed collaboration, engagement and innovation, improving the sustainability of projects over time.  

Mining cryptocurrency with Raspberry Pi and Storj

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Linux

I'm always looking for ways to map hot technologies to fun, educational classroom use. One of the most interesting, and potentially disruptive, technologies over the past few years is cryptocurrencies. In the early days, one could profitably mine some of the most popular cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin, using a home PC. But as cryptocurrency mining has become more popular, thanks in part to dedicated mining hardware, the algorithms governing it have boosted computational complexity, making home PC mining often impractical, unprofitable, and environmentally unwise.

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If You're Ready for Arch, ArchMerge Eases the Way

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GNU
Linux

Newcomer ArchMerge Linux offers a big change for the better to those switching from the Debian Linux lineage to the Arch Linux infrastructure.

ArchMerge Linux is a recent spinoff of ArchLabs Linux. I recently reviewed Archlabs and found it to be a step up from most Arch Linux offerings in terms of installation and usability. Arch Linux distros, in general, are notorious for their challenging installation and software management processes.

ArchMerge Linux brings a few extra ingredients that make trying it well worth your while if you want to consider migrating to the Arch Linux platform. Still, no Arch Linux distro is a suitable starting point for Linux newcomers. That reality does not change with ArchMerge, although it helps ease the process considerably for those who are ready for it.

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How to Install Arch Linux

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Linux

Installing Arch Linux could be a tidious and tricky task. Here's how to do it the right way.
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Linux on Devices: Ataribox and More

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Linux
Hardware
  • With Ataribox, the Legend Returns -- Powered by Linux

    Available to pre-order on Thursday for a special price via an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign, the Ataribox is shaping up to be an amalgam of retro gaming console and living room PC. Details are mostly sketchy at this point, but we do know that it will be powered by some variant of Linux OS and will include over 100 Atari classic games pre-installed.

  • Atari plans to open preorders for its Ataribox home console this Thursday

    Preorders for the Ataribox, the classic game company’s take on a NES Classic retro console, are slated to go live this Thursday, according to a report from CNET citing an email from Atari sent out today to interested consumers. The Ataribox was first teased back at E3 in June and then in a more formal unveiling in July, in which the Atari 2600-inspired PC was shown in two customization options: a wood-like finish or a more modern and sleek black and red look.

  • Rugged in-vehicle PC line includes Kaby Lake and Bay Trail models

    Ibase’s rugged MPT V-Series in-vehicle computers offer 7th/6th Gen Core or Bay Trail CPUs, plus 2x mini-PCIe, 3x M.2, and optional CAN or OBD-II links.

    Ibase announced a new line of fanless MPT V-Series computers for IoT applications, starting with two rugged, in-vehicle models: the MPT-7000V with Intel’s 7th (“Kaby Lake”) or 6th (“Skylake”) Generation Core processors and the MPT-3000V with a quad-core, 1.91GHz Atom E3845 from the Bay Trail generation with 10W TDP. The systems support Windows 7/10 or Linux with kernel 3.8.0. In both cases, 64-bit implementations are required in order to use the driver for the supplied G-sensor, which appears to be necessary for shock resistance.

  • Apollo Lake based IoT gateway and embedded controller runs Ubuntu

    Adlink’s rugged “MXE-210” gateway offers Atom x7-E3950 or x5-E3930 SoCs, industrial protocol support, and mini-PCIe wireless and storage options.

    The Intel Apollo Lake based MXE-210 adds to a line of rugged Adlink MXE computers such as the Bay Trail Atom based MXE-200i. The compact, 140 x 110 x 58mm MXE-210 is an “IIoT-ready combination embedded controller and IoT gateway” designed for rugged industrial automation, transportation, agriculture/aquaculture, and smart city applications, says Adlink.

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