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Eltechs Debuts x86 Crossover Platform for ARM Tablets, Mini-PCs

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software

The product, called ExaGear Desktop, runs x86 operating systems on top of hardware devices using ARMv7 CPUs. That's significant because x86 software, which is the kind that runs natively on most computing platforms today, does not generally work on ARM hardware unless software developers undertake the considerable effort of porting it. Since few are likely to do that, having a way to run x86 applications on ARM devices is likely to become increasingly important as more ARM-based tablets and portable computers come to market.

That said, the ExaGear Desktop, which Eltechs plans to make available next month, currently has some steep limitations. First, it only supports Ubuntu Linux. And while Eltechs said support for additional Linux distributions is forthcoming, there's no indication the product will be able to run x86 builds of Windows on ARM hardware, a feat that is likely to be in much greater demand than Linux compatibility.

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5 Linux distributions for very old computers

Filed under
Linux

This is part 4 in a series of articles designed to help you choose the right Linux distribution for your circumstances.

Here are the links to the first three parts:
Which desktop environment should you use?
5 easiest to use Linux distributions for modern machines
5 easiest to use Linux distributions for older machines
Some of you will have computers that are really old and none of the solutions presented thus far are of much use.

This guide lists those distributions designed to run with limited RAM, limited disk space and limited graphics capabilities.

Ease of use is sometimes comprimised when using the really light distributions but once you get used to them they are every bit as functional as a Ubuntu or Linux Mint.

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LinuxCon and CloudOpen 2014 Keynote Videos Available

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Linux

Video recordings of the LinuxCon and CloudOpen North America keynotes are now available on the Linux Foundation YouTube channel, and are embedded below, here.

The event started Wednesday with Executive Director Jim Zemlin's “State of Linux” keynote at 9 a.m. Central, followed by a panel discussion of Linux kernel developers that included Linux Creator Linus Torvalds.

Tomorrow morning keynotes will be streamed live (live video available here with login) and will be available later on in the day. You'll also find live updates on Linux Foundation Twitter,Facebook and Google+ channels and at the #LinuxCon and #CloudOpen hash tags, as well as more in-depth keynote coverage here on Linux.com.

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Userptr Support Set For AMD Radeon GPUs In Linux 3.18

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Linux

While it was originally set for Linux 3.17, with the Linux 3.18 kernel that's still months away will be userptr support for the AMD Radeon graphics driver.

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Intel Sandy Bridge Gains On Linux 3.17 Extend Beyond Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Yesterday I shared some benchmarks showing Intel Sandy Bridge HD Graphics performance increasing on Linux 3.17 for this several year old architecture. This came as a surprise but the good news is the performance improvements on this new Linux kernel don't stop with OpenGL but extend to CPU performance too.

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Acer Offers New Desktop Chromebox

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Acer, which has been rapidly gaining popularity as a portable computing hardware manufacturer, has been placing some heavy bets on Google's cloud-centric Chrome OS platform. The company has a fleet of portable computers based on Chrome OS, and is taking Chrome OS to the desktop form factor with a new system.

Acer’s Chromebox CXI system, announced on Thursday, is seen back-mounted in the photo and runs an Intel Celeron 2957U dual-core 1.4GHz processor. It also has a 16GB solid-state drive, and--like other systems based on Chrome OS--offers a fast boot-up time that Acer claims takes only eight seconds.

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Ken Starks to Keynote At Ohio LinuxFest

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

As most FOSS Force readers probably already know, Ken’s articles here and on his own Blog of Helios are only a small part of what he does. He’s one of those too rare people who works to make a difference in this world and he does so by leveraging the power of Linux and free and open source software for the greater good.

As the founder of the Reglue project (originally called Helios), he’s responsible for putting refurbished computers in the hands of financially challenged students in and around the Austin, Texas area where he resides. Over the years there have been thousands of these students and many of them, given Reglue computers while in middle or high school, have gone on to not only earn undergraduate degrees, but to attend graduate school as well — often studying computer science.

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Intel Sandy Bridge Gets A Surprise Boost From Linux 3.17

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Besides the recent work to support OpenGL Geometry Shaders for Sandy Bridge in Mesa, users of Intel "Sandy Bridge" HD Graphics can also be thankful for the forthcoming Linux 3.17 kernel. Early testing of Linux 3.17 has revealed that for at least some Intel Sandy Bridge hardware are OpenGL performance improvements with the newer kernel code.

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Open Source Okavango14: The Heartbeat of the Delta

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Misc

We can hear this heartbeat by listening to what the environment tells us through sensors and testing. I proposed that we build low cost sensors using open source hardware and software. In recent years there has been quite a disruption in computing ability as a result of the prevalence of smartphones. Increasingly small and powerful components and processors have created an opportunities that we would have never thought possible. One of the results of that is the single-board Raspberry Pi computer. Originally, the Raspberry Pi was created to enable students to learn hardware and software development. For the Okavango Wilderness Project, we are using them to take environmental readings and send those to us for inclusion into the Into The Okavango website. Jer will cover this more in his expedition post. We are using them to measure water temperature, pH, conductivity, total dissolved solids, salinity, and specific gravity.

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Kochi innovator Arvind Sanjeev makes Google Glass clone for Rs 4,500

Filed under
Android
Linux

Instead of commercializing the product and with the intention of contributing to the community, Sanjeev posted a blog explaining how his 'Smart Cap' can be built by anyone using opensource hardware such as a Rasberry Pi computer, an Arduino board and Android software.

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Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information. Read more

Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more

New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release. Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of us in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit. Read more