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Linux

antiX 17 Linux Operating System Gets New Alpha Build, Now Uses Kernel 4.9.6

Filed under
Linux
Debian

Debian-based antiX 17 Linux has recently entered development, and it today received a new Alpha build, the second in the upcoming series based on the soon-to-be-released Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system.

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Judge Nixes PS3 Linux Class Action Settlement As Class's Lawyers Victimize The Class A Second Time

Filed under
Linux
Legal

We've made the point for several years now that the way class action lawsuits are handled in America is flawed in fundemental ways. What was supposed to be a method for enabling large groups of the aggrieved to pool resources against much larger and better-funded entities has instead devolved into a procedure that appears almost perfectly designed to enrich unscrupulous lawyers while the class itself gets a laughable percentage any monetary damages.

We get to see these flaws in practice yet again, this time in an update for the story that simply will not die: the legal action over Sony removing the PS3's ability to run Linux, which it advertised when the console launched. The class action suit had reached a proposed settlement, only to have the presiding judge nix it, essentially over concerns that the class was being victimized all over again, this time by its own lawyers.

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Five New Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities Patched in Ubuntu 16.10 for Raspberry Pi 2

Filed under
Linux
Security
Ubuntu

Canonical announced a few hours ago the availability of a new security update for the Raspberry Pi 2 kernel packages of the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating system, which patches a total of five newly discovered vulnerabilities.

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Real-time Linux explained, and contrasted with Xenomai and RTAI

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Linux

At ELC Europe, Real-time Linux developer Jan Altenberg described the progress of RTL, compared it to Xenomai and RTAI, and unveiled new benchmarks.

Real-time Linux (RTL), a form of mainline Linux enabled with PREEMPT_RT, has come a long way in the past decade. Some 80 percent of the deterministic PREEMPT_RT patch is now available in the mainline kernel itself. Yet, backers of the strongest alternative to the single-kernel RTL on Linux — the dual-kernel Xenomai — continue to claim a vast superiority in reduced latency. In an Embedded Linux Conference Europe presentation in October, Jan Altenberg rebutted these claims while offering an overview of the real-time topic.

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10 Top Most Popular Linux Distributions of 2016

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As 2016 gone (nearly 40 days), it is time to review the most popular Linux distributions of the year. In this article we are going to discuss 10 top most popular Linux distributions of 2016 based on Distrowatch hits.

You may have question, how you are taking? why you are taking? the list from Distrowatch. It’s one of the oldest and best website which provides Linux distribution release information since 2001.

Not only me and lot’s of Linux enthusiasts very often visit distrowatch website to know the distribution release status. There are lots of Linux distributions are out as of now (nearly 300 distributions) and still counting, every distribution comes with its own unique features and purpose but some of the distributions become very famous and most of the distributions go away even Top 100. It’s purely depends upon the company, how they are taking the distribution to next level by including new things & fixing bugs. In other hand, how users are picking the distribution based on their requirements.

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Also: Advice Wanted: The Underlying OS for soylentnews.org

How to install Linux

The Forces Of Evil Still Try To Shut Down LiMux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

It’s hard to believe but a dozen years after the decision was made to migrate to GNU/Linux for the IT system of Munich, the dark forces are still trying to reverse the decision. Now, there is a plan afoot to make a plan to reverse the decision four years from now. I kid you not. Will these jokers still be in power then? The next federal election is next year… The next election in Munich is 2020…

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Kurdish Group Hacks openSUSE Linux Website

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

In this day and age, you never know where you're going to run across a political statement. For example, if you visited the openSUSE News website on Monday, you would have been treated to an image of the Kurdistan flag, along with a rather potty mouthed anti-ISIS statement.

Yup. The openSUSE site had been defaced, by a hacker identifying himself as MuhmadEmad and connected with a group called "KurDish HaCk3Rs." A screenshot of the defaced site is available -- thanks to Roy Schestowitz, publisher of Tux Machines and Techrights -- but we'll not show it here due to an F-bomb in the message. The good news is that little harm seems to have been done and the site was quickly returned to normal by way of a recent backup.

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Linux-driven dev board harnesses Sitara PRU-ICSS

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Linux

MYIR unveiled a new development board for its TI AM437x based “MYC-C437X” module designed to tap the AM437x’s PRU-ICSS real-time chips.

In late 2015, MYIR launched its MYD-C437X baseboard and MYC-C437x COM based on TI’s single Cortex-A9, 1GHz Sitara PRU-ICSS (Programmable Real-Time Unit and Industrial Communication Subsystem) AM437x SoC. Now, the Chinese manufacturer has spun a MYD-C437X-PRU development board that uses the same Linux-driven MYC-C437x COM. It’s designed for developers who want to exploit the capabilities of the AM437x’s quad-core, 200MHz PRU-ICSS real-time, programmable chips. The MYC-C437x module is again supported with a Linux BSP, now upgraded to a Linux 4.1.18 kernel.

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Escuelas Linux 5.1 Officially Released with LibreOffice 5.3 and Vivaldi Browser

Filed under
LibO
Linux

The development team behind the Escuelas Linux operating system informed Softpedia today about the immediate availability of the Escuelas Linux 5.1 release, a major milestone that adds numerous improvements and new components.

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Poverty Helps You Keep Technology Safe and Easy

Filed under
Linux

But wait! There’s more! The Android phones that got famous for burning up everything in sight were top-dollar models my wife says she wouldn’t want even if we could afford them. Safety first, right? Frugality’s up there, too.

Now let’s talk about how I got started with Linux.

Guess what? It was because I was poor! The PC I had back in the days of yore ran DOS just fine, but couldn’t touch Windows 98 when it came out. Not only that, but Windows was expensive, and I was poor. Luckily, I had time on my hands, so I rooted around on the Internet (at phone modem speed) and eventually lit upon Red Hat Linux, which took forever to download and had an install procedure so complicated that instead of figuring it out I wrote an article about how Linux might be great for home computer use someday in the future, but not at the moment.

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Security Leftovers

  • Atom Installer
    One thing that I miss about using Ubuntu is PPA’s there are lot’s of PPA in Ubuntu and you can hack around and install all types of software which are required for your usage. In the Fedora side of the world there are copr repos but they don’t have as many repos as in Ubuntu and you can’t build non-free software (don’t get me wrong here, I love FREEdom software but couldn’t resist not using some beautiful non-free applications such as Sublime). I am creating a work around for this by using shell scripts which are open source (cc0) but when those scripts are executed they install non-free software on your system.
  • MKVToolNix 9.9.0 MKV Manipulation Tool Released with New GUI Improvements, More
    MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus announced today, February 20, 2017, the release and general availability of MKVToolNix 9.9.0 "Pick Up" for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. MKVToolNix 9.9.0 represents a month of hard work, during which the developer managed to add a bunch of new and interesting features, fix as many bugs reported by users since last month's MKVToolNix 9.8.0 point release, as well as to improve the build system, especially in regards to the man pages of the software.
  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.2 and KDE Applications 16.12.2, More
    The developers behind the Chakra GNU/Linux operating system have announced today the immediate availability of all the latest KDE technologies released this month in the stable repositories of the distribution. Yes, we're talking about the KDE Plasma 5.9.2 desktop environment, KDE Applications 16.12.2 software suite, KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, and KDE Development Platform 4.14.29, all of which can be found in your Chakra GNU/Linux's repos if you want to run the newest KDE software.

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • IOTA: IoT revolutionized with a Ledger
    Ever since the introduction of digital money, the world quickly came to realize how dire and expensive the consequences of centralized systems are. Not only are these systems incredibly expensive to maintain, they are also “single points of failures” which expose a large number of users to unexpected service interruptions, fraudulent activities and vulnerabilities that can be exploited by malicious hackers. Thanks to Blockchain, which was first introduced through Bitcoin in 2009, the clear benefits of a decentralized and “trustless” transactional settlement system became apparent. No longer should expensive trusted third parties be used for handling transactions, instead, the flow of money should be handled in a direct, Peer-to-Peer fashion. This concept of a Blockchain (or more broadly, a distributed ledger) has since then become a global phenomenon attracting billions of dollars in investments to further develop the concept.
  • Return Home and Unify: My Case for Unity 8
  • Can netbooks be cool again?
    Earlier this week, my colleague Chaim Gartenberg covered a laptop called the GPD Pocket, which is currently being funded on Indiegogo. As Chaim pointed out, the Pocket’s main advantage is its size — with a 7-inch screen, the thing is really, really small — and its price, a reasonable $399. But he didn’t mention that the Pocket is the resurrection of one of the most compelling, yet fatally flawed, computing trends of the ‘00s: the netbook. So after ten years, are netbooks finally cool again? That might be putting it too strongly, but I’m willing to hope.

Linux Devices

  • Compact, rugged module runs Linux or Android on Apollo Lake
    Ubiqcomm’s 95 x 95mm, Apollo Lake-based “COM-AL6C” COM offers 4K video along with multiple SATA, USB, GbE, and PCIe interfaces, plus -40 to 85°C operation. Ubiqconn Technology Inc. has announced a “COM-AL6C” COM Express Type 6 Compact form factor computer-on-module built around Intel’s Apollo Lake processors and designed to withstand the rigors of both fixed and mobile industrial applications. The module offers a choice among three Intel Apollo Lake processors: the quad-core Atom x5-E3930, quad-core x5-E3940, and dual-core x7-E3950, which are clocked at up to 2.0GHz burst and offer TDPs from 6.5 to 12 Watts.
  • Internet-enable your microcontroller projects for under $6 with ESP8266
    To get started with IoT (the Internet of Things), your device needs, well, an Internet connection. Base Arduino microcontrollers don't have Internet connectivity by default, so you either need to add Ethernet, Wi-Fi shields, or adapters to them, or buy an Arduino that has built-in Internet connectivity. In addition to complexity, both approaches add cost and consume the already-precious Arduino flash RAM for program space, which limits what you can do. Another approach is to use a Raspberry Pi or similar single-board computer that runs a full-blown operating system like Linux. The Raspberry Pi is a solid choice in many IoT use cases, but it is often overkill when all you really want to do is read a sensor and send the reading up to a server in the cloud. Not only does the Raspberry Pi potentially drive up the costs, complexity, and power consumption of your project, but it is running a full operating system that needs to be patched, and it has a much larger attack surface than a simple microcontroller. When it comes to IoT devices and security, simpler is better, so you can spend more time making and less time patching what you already made.
  • Blinkenlights!
  • Blinkenlights, part 2
  • Blinkenlights, part 3
  • [Older] Shmoocon 2017: The Ins And Outs Of Manufacturing And Selling Hardware
    Every day, we see people building things. Sometimes, useful things. Very rarely, this thing becomes a product, but even then we don’t hear much about the ins and outs of manufacturing a bunch of these things or the economics of actually selling them. This past weekend at Shmoocon, [Conor Patrick] gave the crowd the inside scoop on selling a few hundred two factor authentication tokens. What started as a hobby is now a legitimate business, thanks to good engineering and abusing Amazon’s distribution program.
  • 1.8 Billion Mobile Internet Users NEVER use a PC, 200 Million PC Internet Users never use a mobile phone. Understanding the 3.5 Billion Internet Total Audience
    As I am working to finish the 2017 Edition of the TomiAhonen Almanac (last days now) I always get into various updates of numbers, that remind me 'I gotta tell this story'.. For example the internet user numbers. We have the December count by the ITU for year 2016, that says the world has now 3.5 Billion internet users in total (up from 3.2 Billion at the end of year 2015). So its no 'drama' to know what is 'that' number. The number of current internet total users is yes, 3.5 Billion, almost half of the planet's total population (47%).